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Old 08-02-2012, 8:29 AM
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Starcom21 Starcom21 is offline
IL / MO Database Admin
   
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Glen Carbon, IL (MetroEast-St Louis)
Posts: 775
Default PL Code Converter

Standard Converter:

CTCSS Code Chart

Wolfsburg Code Converter (used in many ems helos)

Since there is an abbreviated code scheme for these frequencies common to systems supplied by Motorola Communications & Electronics Inc.,
the Motorola (MOT.) code designations of these CTCSS frequencies are also shown. Similarly, the Wolfsberg (WOLF.) codes are also shown. To the extent possible, CTCSS tones within a local geographic area should be exclusively from either Group A or Group B to avoid false sensing due to adjacent tone frequencies.

Group A
CTCSS MOT. WOLF
Freq.(Hz) Code Code
100.0 1Z 14
107.2 1B 16
114.8 2A 18
123.0 3Z 22
131.8 3B 24
141.3 4A 26
151.4 5Z 28
162.2 5B 32
173.8 6A 34
186.2 7Z 36
203.5 M1 38
Group B

CTCSS MOT. WOLF
Freq.(Hz) Code Code
94.8 ZA 12
103.5 1A 15
110.9 2Z 17
127.3 3A 23
136.5 4Z 25
146.2 4B 27
156.7 5A 31
167.9 6Z 33
192.8 7A 37
210.7 M2

Lots of crazy info ----

CTCSS
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System, also known by various trade names such as Private Line or PL (Motorola), Channel Guard (GE) and Quiet Channel (E.F.Johnson), is a method of superimposing a subaudible audio tone on a carrier in order to eliminate co-channel interference. CTCSS tones are known by various designators in addition to the tone frequency; the most common of these are the Motorola codes. The original 32 tones ended at 203.5 Hz; there are now 50 tones, with new tones having been added above 203.5 and in between other tones.
The Wolfsburg (or "Flex") designators are commonly used by EMS helicopters; the Wolfsburg radio is a rugged continuous-coverage VHF-UHF radio that can be set to almost any frequency between 30 MHz and 512 MHz. It is generally used by EMS helicopters for communicating with agencies that have requested helicopter transport of trauma victims or other seriously ill/injured persons.
The RELM (Regency Land Mobile) codes are those commonly used in Regency/RELM land mobile transceivers and the new HS-200 and MS-200 scanners.
Tone Motorola Code RELM Code Wolfsburg Code Tone Motorola Code Wolfsburg Code RELM Code
None None 000 0 167.9 6Z 33 027
67.0 XZ 001 1 173.8 6A 34 028
71.9 XA 002 2 179.9 6B 35 029
74.4 WA 003 3 186.2 7Z 36 030
77.0 XB 004 4 192.8 7A 37 031
79.7 WB 005 5 203.5 M1 38 032
82.5 YZ 006 6 210.7 M2 none 033
85.4 YA 007 7 218.1 M3 none 034
88.5 YB 008 8 225.7 M4 none 035
91.5 ZZ 009 11 233.6 none none 036
94.8 ZA 010 12 241.8 none none 037
97.4 ZB 011 13 250.3 none none 038
100.0 1Z 012 14 69.4 WZ none 039
103.5 1A 013 15 159.8 none none 040
107.2 1B 014 16 165.5 none none 041
110.9 2Z 015 17 171.3 none none 042
114.8 2A 016 18 177.3 none none 043
118.8 2B 017 21 183.5 none none 044
123.0 3Z 018 22 189.9 none none 045
127.3 3A 019 23 196.6 none none 046
131.8 3B 020 24 199.5 none none 047
136.5 4Z 021 25 206.5 8Z none 048
141.3 4A 022 26 229.1 9Z none 049
146.2 4B 023 27 254.1 0Z none 050
151.4 5Z 024 28 150.0 none none See Note
156.7 5A 025 31
162.2 5B 026 32

Note:
The 150.0 Hz PL tone is used by the U.S military on VHF low-band frequencies to reduce or eliminate interference. It is often referred to by military communications personnel as "New Squelch".
DCS
Digital Coded Squelch, also known by the Motorola trade name DPL (Digital Private Line), is similar to CTCSS except that it superimposes a subaudible digital code on a carrier instead of a subaudible audio tone. DCS codes can be normal or inverted; this gives a total of 206 digital codes.
Norma l Inverte d Norma l Inverte d Norma l Inverte d Norma l Inverte d
023 047 155 731 325 526 516 432
025 244 156 265 331 465 523 246
026 464 162 503 332 455 526 325
031 627 165 251 343 532 532 343
036 172 172 036 346 612 546 132
043 445 174 074 351 243 565 703
047 023 205 263 364 131 606 631
051 032 212 356 365 125 612 346
053 452 223 134 371 734 624 632
054 413 225 122 411 226 627 031
065 271 226 411 412 143 631 606
071 306 243 351 413 054 632 624
072 245 244 025 423 315 654 743
073 506 245 072 431 723 662 466
074 174 246 523 432 516 664 311
114 712 251 165 445 043 703 565
115 152 252 462 446 255 712 114
116 754 255 446 452 053 723 431
122 225 261 732 454 266 731 155
125 365 263 205 455 332 732 261
131 364 265 156 462 252 734 371
132 546 266 454 464 026 743 654
134 223 271 065 465 331 754 116
143 412 274 145 466 662
145 274 306 071 503 162
152 115 311 664 506 073
032 051 315 423

PAGING TONES
Fire and EMS departments use paging tones constantly. Various combinations of tones are used for alerting individual firehouses, off-duty full-time personnel, volunteer personnel, for activating lights and doors, and a whole variety of other purposes.
There are two common sets of tones used for pager alerting, Plectron and Motorola. Plectron was an early manufacturer of paging equipment (mostly for public safety), and while the company has since gone through several changes of ownership and are now owned by Federal Signal Corporation, Plectron receivers are still available (and remain to this day excellent single-channel monitor receivers). Motorola paging equipment is essentially the same as Plectron, with the major difference being the available tone frequencies. General Electric also manufactured a line of pagers and alerting receivers geared to the public safety market, with yet another set of unique tone frequencies, but the GE line was not nearly as popular as Plectron or Motorola. The tones most commonly heard today are Motorola and Plectron.

PLECTRON
Plectron is an early paging system commonly used by many volunteer fire departments; in fact, the name "Plectron" has almost become a generic phrase for alerting pagers and receivers, and is so common that many departments refer to their pagers and monitor receivers as "Plectrons", even if their system was made by Motorola or another manufacturer.
Plectron uses a long single tone, or two tones sent sequentially with various timing cycles.
Tone # Freq. Tone # Freq. Tone # Freq. Tone # Freq.
282.2 517.8 11 992.0 25 1820.0
294.7 540.7 12 1036.0 26 1901.0
307.8 564.7 13 1082.0 27 1985.0
321.4 589.7 14 1130.0 28 2073.0
335.6 615.8 15 1180.0 29 2164.0
350.5 2 672.0 16 1232.0 30 2260.0
366.0 3 701.0 17 1287.0 31 2361.0
382.3 4 732.0 18 1344.0 32 2465.0
399.2 5 765.0 19 1403.0 33 2575.0
416.9 6 799.0 20 992.0 34 2688.0
435.3 7 834.0 21 1530.0 35 2807.0
454.6 8 871.0 22 1598.0 36 2932.0
474.8 9 910.0 23 1669.0 3062.0
495.8 10 950.0 24 1743.0 1957.0


MOTOROLA
There are various formats used for Motorola tone paging; the most common are Quik-Call I ("2+2") and and Quik-Call II ("1+1"). Quik-Call II is the most common, and sends 2 individual tones sequentially. Long single tones can also be sent to activate pagers set up for group as well as individual paging; this is common with volunteer fire departments.
Quik-Call I is not quite as common; it sends 2 tones sequentially, but each tone is made up of 2 individual tones (similar to DTMF; see below). The advantage to this is that it is more difficult for pagers and monitor receivers to "false" (be activated by a false tone, or atmospheric noise, etc.).

Quik-Call II (1+1) Tone Groups
Tone Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group 6 Group 10 Group 11
0 330.5 569.1 1092.4 321.7 553.9 1122.5 1472.9 1930.2
1 349.0 600.9 288.5 339.6 584.8 1153.4 1513.5 1989.0
2 368.5 634.5 296.5 358.6 617.4 1185.2 1555.2 2043.8
3 389.0 669.9 304.7 378.6 651.9 1217.8 1598.0 2094.5
4 410.8 707.3 313.0 399.8 688.3 1251.4 1642.0 2155.6
5 433.7 746.8 953.7 422.1 726.8 1285.8 1687.2 2212.2
6 457.9 788.5 979.9 445.7 767.4 1321.2 1733.7 2271.7
7 483.5 832.5 1006.9 470.5 810.2 1357.6 1781.5 2334.6
8 510.5 879.0 1034.7 496.8 855.5 1395.0 1830.5 2401.0
9 539.0 928.1 1063.2 524.6 903.2 1433.4 1881.0 2468.2
Diagon al 569.1 979.9 569.1 569.1 979.9 979.9 none none


Quik-Call I (2+2) Tone Groups
Tone Group A Group B Group Z
0 358.9 371.5 346.7
1 398.1 412.1 384.6
2 441.6 457.1 426.6
3 489.8 507.0 473.2
4 543.3 562.3 524.8
5 602.6 623.7 582.1
6 668.3 691.8 645.7
7 741.3 767.4 716.1
8 822.2 851.1 794.3
9 912.0 944.1 881.0
A 1011.6 1047.1 977.2
B 1122.1 1161.4 1084.0
Diagon al 979.9 979.9 979.9


GENERAL ELECTRIC
Tone Group A Group B Group C
0 682.5 652.5 667.5
1 592.5 607.5 712.5
2 757.5 787.5 772.5
3 802.5 832.5 817.5
4 847.5 877.5 862.5
5 892.5 922.5 907.5
6 937.5 967.5 952.5
7 547.5 517.5 532.5
8 727.5 562.5 577.5
9 637.5 697.5 622.5
Diagona l 742.5 742.5 742.5

DTMF
Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency tones are the ones you hear when dialing a call on your touch-tone phone. Originally designed for use on the military AUTOVON telephone network, DTMF tones are used in radio systems for remote control of various devices like fire and tornado sirens, firehouse lights and doors, and so on; activation of monitor receivers; radio identification; and almost any other purpose that requires remote tone control.
Each tone that is heard is a combination of the high and low tones shown along the top and right side of the diagram below; for example, when '1' is pressed, the tone you hear is a combination of 1209 Hz and 697 Hz. Not usually seen on telephones or most commercial radios, the A, B, C and D characters were originally designated as FO (Flash Override), F (Flash), I (Immediate), and P (Priority); these were used on the military AUTOVON network to establish the priority of a call and bump lower-priority calls from the network if necessary (Flash Override is the highest priority). A, B, C and D are most commonly used today by amateur radio operators for repeater control.
1209 Hz 1336 Hz 1477 Hz 1633 Hz
1 2 3 A 697 Hz
4 5 6 B 770 Hz
7 8 9 C 852 Hz
* 0 # D 941 Hz
__________________
Terry Weatherford, WX9SAR
IL / MO / MI - RR Database Admin

Last edited by Starcom21; 08-02-2012 at 8:40 AM..
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