RadioReference on Facebook   RadioReference on Twitter   RadioReference Blog
 

Go Back   The RadioReference.com Forums > Amateur Radio > Amateur Radio General Discussion

Amateur Radio General Discussion General discussion forum for amateur radio topics not covered by the above forums.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 6:48 AM
BOBRR's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 466
Default vhf/uhf Calibration Signals Transmitted ?

Hello,

Are there any transmitted reference calibration signals (like WWV does on the lower freq's) that
one can use to check out a SDR receiver in the vhf/uhf freq. ranges ?

Particularly around 100 to 400 MHz ?
But higher and lower also of interest.

Thanks,
Bob
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 6:54 AM
rfradioconsult's Avatar
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,102
Default

The NOAA weather channels should work pretty well, can be received in most of the U. S.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 7:29 AM
BOBRR's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 466
Default From OP: What To Use Up To 450 MHz ?

Hi,

Thank you; good suggestion.

Any thoughts on who/what to use for higher freq's., up to around 450 MHz ?

Thanks,
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:24 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: California
Posts: 4,552
Default

What exactly are you trying to accomplish? There are tons of signals to listen to. Are you looking for highly accurate RF frequency, or time ticks? Just a continuous source of audio? Tell us what you need it to do, and we can offer up suggestions.

If you need a frequency reference, simulcast systems are generally locked to GPS, and highly accurate.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 11:44 AM
BOBRR's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 466
Default From OP:

Hi,

Something like wwv would be great.

Trying to calibrate the hfsdr program I"m using with my new Dongle,, and need something "narrow" and clear,that I can
reasonably accurately tune to its peak, and see how far off in freq. it is.

Thanks for help,
Bob
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 12:27 PM
kb2vxa's Avatar
Completely Banned for the Greater Good
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Point Pleasant Beach, N.J.
Posts: 6,127
Default

For that you need a station monitor, a calibrated and highly accurate instrument used by repair shops. They cost an arm and a leg, I doubt you wish to sacrifice body parts. WWV is unique being an extremely accurate time and frequency standard with an "atomic clock" actually a cesium laser at its heart.

Bottom line here is you can use off air signals to get you in the ballpark on the receiving end since transmitters must be kept to tight FCC frequency tolerances. That's the best you can get but don't expect them to be dead on, considering your purpose they're "good enough for government work".
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-01-2012, 1:04 PM
k3td's Avatar
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Georgetown, TX
Posts: 189
Default

There are VHF/UHF beacons around New England that are used to monitor enhanced propagation conditions. Here is a list that includes the 6 digit Maidenhead grid square for location referencce, but I'm not sure how current the list is.
VHF/UHF BEACONS by WZ1V

Local VHF amateur radio contesters and weak signal operators in the northeast could probably point you to something more current and specific to your location.
N.E.W.S. Group Homepage
__________________
Tad, K3TD
EM10dq
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-02-2012, 12:27 PM
JnglMassiv's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago / 016
Posts: 944
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb2vxa View Post
WWV is unique being an extremely accurate time and frequency standard with an "atomic clock" actually a cesium laser at its heart.
I think what makes WWV unique is that it is a single source for a time signal. You could pretty easily build the hardware to accomplish the same thing on V or UHF but it won't get very far, even with massive power, and so you'd need to set up stations all over the place.
I tried and failed to find how much power WWV runs. Anyone know? And do they turn it down at night?
__________________
...amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood. Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood. Passersby were amazed by the...
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 12-02-2012, 1:40 PM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Wichita Falls, TX
Posts: 4,129
Default

Power output is different on different frequencies.
NIST Radio Station WWV
__________________
Tom
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All information here is Copyright 2012 by RadioReference.com LLC and Lindsay C. Blanton III.Ad Management by RedTyger
Copyright 2011 by RadioReference.com LLC Privacy Policy  |  Terms and Conditions