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Old 01-07-2013, 6:13 PM
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Default 1240.000---1300mhz

I been through all th freqs in my scanners. Never hear any thing 1240---1300. Anvone ever use it,or is it a reception thing.?
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Old 01-07-2013, 6:53 PM
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Reception is more limited than VHF or UHF, but in my area it's a pretty empty band.
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Old 01-07-2013, 7:18 PM
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These Uniden scanners don't receive well at all above the 860MHz public service bands.
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Old 01-07-2013, 7:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainetrunk View Post
I been through all th freqs in my scanners. Never hear any thing 1240---1300. Anvone ever use it,or is it a reception thing.?
Yes - without a decent antenna/height and or real good cable you aint gonna hear anything.

If you were in California you would have a better chance of hearing something as it is used
much more with all of the high hills/mountains with many more repeaters and also quite a
bit of simplex linking as well as the ssb portion of the band but your scanners aint gonna
be able to demodulate that even if you could hear it. In my area as in most only an occaisional
repeater with most of them being low profile and a small amount of simplex linking. Look over
the local repeater coordinators website or the arrl repeater directory for california and it is
loaded with them.

NOTE: I think I have may have the only one in NJ that is not a paper repeater.....dan n2aym
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Last edited by fineshot1; 01-07-2013 at 7:28 PM..
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Old 01-07-2013, 7:35 PM
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Naw-that alright. Just call them fazed out,not forgotten
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Old 01-07-2013, 9:41 PM
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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; U; en-US) Gecko/20081217 Vision-Browser/8.1 301x200 LG VN530)

1282-1288 MHz is the FM repeater output sub-band. 1294-1295 MHz is the FM simplex sub-band. Concentrate any scanning/searching in those two segments.
(This is the national bandplan. There may be local differences depending on your local coordinators.)

Last edited by KB7MIB; 01-07-2013 at 9:44 PM..
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Old 01-07-2013, 9:44 PM
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Here in Frisco that band's dead as hell too.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainetrunk View Post
Anvone ever use it,or is it a reception thing.?
Yes, and yes.

Figure that your scanner sucks on that frequency. Seriously. It'll be around several microvolts sensitivity. Also, figure that the typical scanner antenna and feedline won't deliver several microvolts to the receiver, thereby giving the impression of a completely dead band.

In Southern California (yeah, I know you're a LOOOONG way from here) 1200 is heavily used for point to point links. There's a moderate handful of 1200 repeaters, and lots of amateur television activity on the band.

In other parts of the country, yes, it's pretty dead. It's also getting some use for FAA radar. That's actually displacing some amateur activity.
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