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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2013, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by WB4CS View Post
Glad to hear that you're enjoying the hobby and don't have your license and radio tucked away for the end.
Nope...It's a hoot! I'm even working our local March of Dimes "Walk for Babies" with our RACES group this weekend.
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Old 04-15-2013, 6:18 PM
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Originally Posted by N4JKD View Post
Biggest problem I am seeing today, is many people who have ham tickets, but never get on the air. I know 4 people who have their ham tickets, and have never even been on the air, or have a desire too. My question than is, why take the time to study or test? Some are also those who got their tickets, spent the money on ham equipment, and got out of it after a couple of years.

Here is my point, yes, there may be a boom in ham radio licenses now, but in 10 years, or 11, after the licenses are set to expire, will we still be able to say the same thing, or no?

People who have call signs and smartphones can access an Echolink app, and use it, but it is not the same IMO. We live in a generation where people are destined to believe that the internet and cellphones will work in any situation...which we know isn't true "IE Hurricane Katrina"

You would figure that more of these "doomsday preppers" would be getting ham radio, but most expect a EMP to fry electronics, so that is probably why they wont.
Here is another "take" on the situation which relates to why some hams are crazy about the hobby and others "just don't get it." A local ham in my area had an IC28 in his car, but removed it. When I asked him why he pulled out the radio he said that since he now had a cellphone he had no further need for a mobile ham radio. I think much of the problem relates back to the kind of ham people you hung out with in your earlier, formative, years. If your friends were public service oriented then you got into CD, ARES, etc. If not then you were on your own to form your own ideas with little reference to traditions, and traditions play a large role in any person's growth in any organized activity. To put it another way, I think that there are those of us who are simply nuts about amateur radio, but there are others who, for whatever reason, are only mildly interested (e.g.: one who goes to the hamfest with his HT battery half charged and doesn't bring a spare battery with him). Neither type of ham is necessarily "bad" or "good" but rather are simply two kinds of people.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:24 PM
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Here is another "take" on the situation which relates to why some hams are crazy about the hobby and others "just don't get it." A local ham in my area had an IC28 in his car, but removed it. When I asked him why he pulled out the radio he said that since he now had a cellphone he had no further need for a mobile ham radio. I think much of the problem relates back to the kind of ham people you hung out with in your earlier, formative, years. If your friends were public service oriented then you got into CD, ARES, etc. If not then you were on your own to form your own ideas with little reference to traditions, and traditions play a large role in any person's growth in any organized activity. To put it another way, I think that there are those of us who are simply nuts about amateur radio, but there are others who, for whatever reason, are only mildly interested (e.g.: one who goes to the hamfest with his HT battery half charged and doesn't bring a spare battery with him). Neither type of ham is necessarily "bad" or "good" but rather are simply two kinds of people.
Just now getting around to getting a cell phone?

I always liked using radios, even when there's a million other ways to communicate. I guess that's why I'm still a ham.
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Old 04-17-2013, 3:07 PM
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Just now getting around to getting a cell phone?

I always liked using radios, even when there's a million other ways to communicate. I guess that's why I'm still a ham.
I echo that sentiment. I could grab my iPhone and dial some random number in Europe and chat away but building an antenna or bringing an old tube set back to life is very rewarding. I’m studying to get my General, and then my Extra, so I can explore more bands and learn more. I have spent a lot of time in the VHF/UHF world and I’m now getting involved in HF.

What will save amateur radio is to welcome new comers; to blast them for not having to learn CW, or taking exams that some view as easy and worthless, or act as band police and complain about the lack of “proper procedure”, is counterproductive. I think one of the best ways is for clubs to contact hams in the area and invite them to a meeting….sometimes all you have to do is ask.

I hear those complaining about the lack of a CW requirement in the current FCC licensing structure but I rarely hear the argument turned the other way on Hams: you had to learn CW to get your ticket but why do you choose not to use it?

Licensing and testing for Ham’s is not the fault of the Ham and to blame them, or imply their ticket is less worthy than yours, is misdirected. If the Ham satisfied the FCC testing requirement, that’s good enough for me.

Proper procedure on the airways is important. What is surprising to me is that some Hams have their own little group and will only acknowledge or respond to someone they know. I hear many call signs being ignored and this is true on most bands. You do have the choice not to speak to someone, but then why has a ticket in the first place?

My two cents….
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Old 04-17-2013, 3:13 PM
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What will save amateur radio is to welcome new comers; to blast them for not having to learn CW, or taking exams that some view as easy and worthless, or act as band police and complain about the lack of “proper procedure”, is counterproductive. I think one of the best ways is for clubs to contact hams in the area and invite them to a meeting….sometimes all you have to do is ask.


My club sends out a good sized stack of post cards every month to new hams in the area inviting them to meetings. Our president's stated goal is to outgrow the location where we host our meetings!
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Old 04-18-2013, 2:52 PM
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My club sends out a good sized stack of post cards every month to new hams in the area inviting them to meetings. Our president's stated goal is to outgrow the location where we host our meetings!
What kind of response, generally, do those mailings get? Have you been able to sign up any new members because of it?

I'm not sure what my local club does along those lines, but I am going to inquire.
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Old 04-18-2013, 3:05 PM
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I don't have numbers; but I know we have gained a few members along the way. I'll see if I can find out. Tonight's our monthly meeting.
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Old 04-18-2013, 7:16 PM
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Default Nick N1IC – How to Save Ham Radio – 5 Part Series

Thanks!
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Old 04-18-2013, 7:28 PM
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Cheating. Open-book testing.
Back when I was teaching EMT's, the Instructor in Charge offered an open book take-home test. She allowed one week to complete the test, and required a minimum passing score of 100%. Answer the question and provide the source (page # in the course textbook). If it was answered incorrectly, the student had a chance to defend his answer.

Every student took the test home, looked up the answers, and came back with their completed tests. The objective was to force everybody to look up the answers and learn something, and it worked.

I know... this would never fly in ham radio testing.
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:47 PM
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I have always been facinated with radio,scanners,...ect. I remember when I was 13 or so using a CB that came with my father's new station wagon. I'm 48 years old and can't learn enough about radio and how all of this works fast enough! Thank God for this website and every other on the Internet because I can't read enough. I took a day off for our next radio meeting because we're hosting the cub scouts and I can't wait to see how they react to the club's presentation.
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Old 04-19-2013, 9:44 AM
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cold hard numbers: (all are rounded)
1997 US population: 267,740,000
2012 US population: 312,780,000

Ham radio operators:
1997: 676,500
2012: 738,500

That gives you pretty much 'stagnant growth' at 0.001% for ham radio licensed operators.
Sad but true...
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Old 04-19-2013, 8:00 PM
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My numbers show a very slight difference between '97 and '12. In '97 hams were .25% of the population, in '12 they were .23% of the population. A .0002% decline, not really earth shattering, and certainly not as 'big' a decline as you claim. Number comparisons are not as 'cut-n-dried' as you may think. You might also remember that the ham bands are a limited resource...
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Old 04-28-2013, 12:27 PM
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Default How to Save Ham Radio Part 3

Here is my next in the series: How to Save Ham Radio
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Old 07-06-2013, 6:39 AM
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Default My last post section 4 and 5

How to Save Ham Radio – Parts 4 & 5 – N1IC – The Easiest Two!





So first of all let me say that I had a started 4 and 5 a long time ago when I was writing this series but due to some personal challenges with my health I had to take a step back from blog posting and this series … with that said I wanted to close it out. 4 and 5 as I started writing them were both serious topics but I wanted to combine them since one will be a little more controversial than the other and hopefully 5 will help bring everyone back from their thoughts on the 4th part J

How to Save Ham Radio
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Old 07-06-2013, 9:35 AM
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I think another problem about ham radio why some people either not get on the radio or just do away with it is because no active repeaters or couple of people tieing up the repeater and talking about nothing whats so ever. Other thing is sad to say the word ''CLICKISH'' comes to mind when bunch of people talking to each other and someone else tries to chime in and the ham operators ignore the guy or lady.

Just my two cents.
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Old 07-30-2013, 12:46 AM
   
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My club sends out a good sized stack of post cards every month to new hams in the area inviting them to meetings. Our president's stated goal is to outgrow the location where we host our meetings!
What Club is this?
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Old 07-30-2013, 11:53 AM
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The KiloCycle Club of Fort Worth. W5SH – Kilocycle Club of Fort Worth

We normally meet on the third Thursday of every month at the Ol' south Pancake House; but our next meeting in August is going to be a joint ice cream social with the Lockheed-Martin ARC.
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Old 08-08-2013, 1:58 PM
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I think it is mostly retirees and people interested in EMCOMM getting their ham licenses today.

The kids have all kinds of electronic things they can communicate on that require zero rules, they can cuss all they want and put pictures of their body parts on them.

I've been trying to get younger people involved and they are just not interested. I have even got my son and daughter a VHF/UHF radio and I cannot get them to study or get their licenses, the radios just sit in the bottom of their junk drawer.

The baby boomers are looking for something to do now that they are retired and there are more and more people realizing that in an emergency, their cell phone just might not work, heck, they only work 90% of the time when things are good and are always dropping calls.

There are also the "Preppers" who have been getting amateur radio gear. I live in a rural area of Idaho and see this happening all the time also.

I got into amateur radio about a year ago as I have always liked radio and decided to join the EMCOMM group where I live. I also handle comms for our Search and Rescue unit so the more able bodied people can be in the field and not stuck at the SAR trailer.

I still don't find much activity on VHF/UHF and therefore operate mostly on HF. Unless conditions are really bad, I can almost always find a good rag chew on HF.

I think better education about the low cost to get started and all of the good study material as well as ham clubs that will work with people to get their first license is what is going to help increase the numbers.
I'm actually glad that it's the slightly older crowd that is getting into radio (over 30 years old). I find a good part of the younger generation anymore lack the maturity it takes to be a responsible operator.

Also, like anything else, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. In city areas and areas with a lot of people per square mile, too many operators make it hard to even get on the air. We need more rural operators and about what we have now in the urban areas. I'm not for locking anyone out, just looking at how things really are. Anytime the bands become overcrowded, it seems that you get the LIDS and people who get mad and just want to cause trouble because they can't wait their turn or talk for an hour because they are more important than everyone else or think they are.

More than anything else, we need people who will realize the responsibility that goes along with pressing the talk button.

John KF7VXA
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Old 08-08-2013, 6:20 PM
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I think it is mostly retirees and people interested in EMCOMM getting their ham licenses today.

The kids have all kinds of electronic things they can communicate on that require zero rules, they can cuss all they want and put pictures of their body parts on them.

I've been trying to get younger people involved and they are just not interested. I have even got my son and daughter a VHF/UHF radio and I cannot get them to study or get their licenses, the radios just sit in the bottom of their junk drawer.

The baby boomers are looking for something to do now that they are retired and there are more and more people realizing that in an emergency, their cell phone just might not work, heck, they only work 90% of the time when things are good and are always dropping calls.

There are also the "Preppers" who have been getting amateur radio gear. I live in a rural area of Idaho and see this happening all the time also.

I got into amateur radio about a year ago as I have always liked radio and decided to join the EMCOMM group where I live. I also handle comms for our Search and Rescue unit so the more able bodied people can be in the field and not stuck at the SAR trailer.

I still don't find much activity on VHF/UHF and therefore operate mostly on HF. Unless conditions are really bad, I can almost always find a good rag chew on HF.

I think better education about the low cost to get started and all of the good study material as well as ham clubs that will work with people to get their first license is what is going to help increase the numbers.
I'm actually glad that it's the slightly older crowd that is getting into radio (over 30 years old). I find a good part of the younger generation anymore lack the maturity it takes to be a responsible operator.

Also, like anything else, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. In city areas and areas with a lot of people per square mile, too many operators make it hard to even get on the air. We need more rural operators and about what we have now in the urban areas. I'm not for locking anyone out, just looking at how things really are. Anytime the bands become overcrowded, it seems that you get the LIDS and people who get mad and just want to cause trouble because they can't wait their turn or talk for an hour because they are more important than everyone else or think they are.

More than anything else, we need people who will realize the responsibility that goes along with pressing the talk button.

John KF7VXA
Oh now, listen to you.

The ham radio gene is genetic but it doesn't always pass down to your next of kin. Sometimes it skips a generation or 2. It doesn't mean young people want to find a medium where they can cuss and post pictures of their body parts.
I think we all know what age group is doing most of that.
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