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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2013, 5:37 AM
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Well... Even `today', AKA `This "age"' when SWMBO and I decide to hit the road for one of our occasional `road trips' or I go `foaming' there is always at least one, if not several more, CB radios tucked in among my scanners and other radios and misc electronics. (And now days, since both of our children are now drivers, whatever vehicle they've decided they are going to claim they `need' *also* ends up looking like `mom-n-pop's'. [Which actually turned out to be a very good thing on one of our `family foaming' trips this last summer!])

We ended up having a `teachable moment' when another, unrelated `foamer' didn't listen to the advice about where to make the ford of a creek and ended up getting stuck sideways between SWMBO and I and the kids. Seems this, I really can't be all that polite about him, idiot passed the kids, almost running them off the road, and despite all the warnings decided to try and make a ford earlier along the creek. Our son, who was being the navigator on that particular leg, hollered at us on the CB to tell us that they had a `bit of a kerfufle' that had them blocked from crossing where we'd always crossed and could we please hold up and possibly tell them if there might be another safe ford they could use to catch up with us. Unfortunately there wasn't one so we turned around and went back to see if we could clear the road. We ended up using the emergency trailer hitch winch on the Explorer they were driving and the front mounted winch on our LR3 to extricate the jacked up Jeep out of the hole they driven into. (We used the Explorers winch to keep the Jeep upright and the LR3's winch to pull them back onto dry land. [Whoo was the guy with the Jeep mad at us! We looped the Explorer's winch cable, with a heavy-duty nylon snatch strap over from the passenger's side to the driver's side frame using the `so-called rollbar' to give some extra leverage. And `set' the LR3 with some well placed `*ROCKS*" and basically `yanked' them back onto the `dry land'.] After we had disconnected and were putting things away the guys with the Jeep didn't even stop to thank us or even volunteer to help us `tidy up' and after getting the Jeep running took off up the `road' like the proverbial `Bat out of Hell'!) 'Course the kids then went and crossed the ford at the correct spot and we were off and running again. About 15 minutes later another `foamer', that we knew and had hoped we might be seeing up at where we usually like to setup at, called us, on the CB natch, and asked us why those two yahoos were so danged upset with us. SWMBO told him we would tell him all about it when we got setup.

What makes this CB oriented? Well, besides the fact that we actually were using CBs, none of the other radios we had with us worked as well as the CBs in that particular location. Once we got over onto the East side of the hill we could use the others. In fact the FRS/GMRS radios, Garmin Rino 530s, were better at keeping us connected and informing us where everyone was. Unfortunately CBs don't have GPS capability. But, they *do* still have a definite place/use when traveling whether out on the pavement, bouncing around the tulies, or between the house and the tractor & trucks. Oh, yeah... If one take the time and does a bit searching one can easily find so danged good deals on CBs, compared to even FRS radios or other types, these days. (Though, I wish I had bought a pair of SSB CB handhelds back when they were still available! I'm always worrying about losing my SSB mobiles and having to always try to either hide them or constantly be removing and reinstalling when we are traveling. With handhelds I could just stick them in one of the pockets my vest has like I do the scanners, Garmins, and the non-SSB handhelds. [And... Yep! I *do* kinda `clank' and look like a walking `antenna farm' sometimes. {VB GRIN!}])
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Old 02-17-2013, 4:41 PM
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Well you really don't NEED a CB but they are good to have a good source of info,entertainment, or just something if by yourself chit chat to keep you awake. Me as long as I am not involved i like to listen go a good argument I like sitting there and listening to folks make fools of themselves.
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Old 02-18-2013, 10:17 AM
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I realize this is a very old post, but since the thread got resurrected the issues of accuracy should still be addressed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MPSCS View Post
The negatives of CB radio...

CB radio would be destroyed in the event of an EMP bomb.
The damage of EMP is often over stated. To be sure, there is a danger there, but it is not the “all electronics destroying” force many people take it for. Additionally many people claim that tube radios are immune to EMP, again an over generalization. Looking at the historical record does not support either position strongly.

Looking at Russian operation K-3 (Test 184) on 22 October, 1962, shows that many tube type radios were destroyed out to a range of 600 km from under the point of detonation, slant ranges of over 700 km. A tube type Russian radar was made inoperable at 1000 km. This weapon was only 300 kt.

And yet in Starfish Prime (a US test, also in 1962) there are no reports of damage to radios in Hawaii, despite the fact that there were many transistor radios in use by then. Things in Hawaii, such as light bulbs and parts of the telephone exchange, were damaged, but no radios reported. Yes, the test was further away, at about 1450 km, but the bomb was much larger, at 1.4 Mt.

EMP, and the affects of EMP, is a pretty complex issue, and can be quite devastating. But many people have an over estimation of what it will do to hardware, and an under estimation of what it will do to the communications and power distribution grids, these items are what would be most impacted. Communications grids are more robust today than at any time in the past, despite being transistor and integrated circuit based. The copper networks of the past offered great capture area for EMP energy, while todays fiber optics will not pick it up or transfer it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MPSCS View Post
CB radio could give away your location to the military, or roving gangs looking for food and other resources.
As would any transmission, regardless of service or band. Operational security should always be a consideration, if it is not safe to transmit then don’t. If anything CB would be less dangerous to the user than say GMRS or FRS, since direction finding equipment for VHF and UHF bands is much more compact and portable.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MPSCS View Post
CB radio could be jammed by the military.
Any radio band can be jammed, but line of sight limited services, such as FRS/GMRS, are easier to jam within a certain desired bubble. And HF frequencies, in general, are logistically harder to jam because of the changing nature of propagation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MPSCS View Post
CB radio does not work well around structures.
But it works as least as well in this situation as the VHF/UHF services (when simplex) you suggest in the next line as “better”.

T!

Last edited by Token; 02-18-2013 at 10:23 AM..
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Token View Post
I realize this is a very old post, but since the thread got resurrected the issues of accuracy should still be addressed.



The damage of EMP is often over stated. To be sure, there is a danger there, but it is not the “all electronics destroying” force many people take it for. Additionally many people claim that tube radios are immune to EMP, again an over generalization. Looking at the historical record does not support either position strongly.

Looking at Russian operation K-3 (Test 184) on 22 October, 1962, shows that many tube type radios were destroyed out to a range of 600 km from under the point of detonation, slant ranges of over 700 km. A tube type Russian radar was made inoperable at 1000 km. This weapon was only 300 kt.

And yet in Starfish Prime (a US test, also in 1962) there are no reports of damage to radios in Hawaii, despite the fact that there were many transistor radios in use by then. Things in Hawaii, such as light bulbs and parts of the telephone exchange, were damaged, but no radios reported. Yes, the test was further away, at about 1450 km, but the bomb was much larger, at 1.4 Mt.

EMP, and the affects of EMP, is a pretty complex issue, and can be quite devastating. But many people have an over estimation of what it will do to hardware, and an under estimation of what it will do to the communications and power distribution grids, these items are what would be most impacted. Communications grids are more robust today than at any time in the past, despite being transistor and integrated circuit based. The copper networks of the past offered great capture area for EMP energy, while todays fiber optics will not pick it up or transfer it.



As would any transmission, regardless of service or band. Operational security should always be a consideration, if it is not safe to transmit then don’t. If anything CB would be less dangerous to the user than say GMRS or FRS, since direction finding equipment for VHF and UHF bands is much more compact and portable.




Any radio band can be jammed, but line of sight limited services, such as FRS/GMRS, are easier to jam within a certain desired bubble. And HF frequencies, in general, are logistically harder to jam because of the changing nature of propagation.




But it works as least as well in this situation as the VHF/UHF services (when simplex) you suggest in the next line as “better”.

T!
Interesting! An advantage that CB does have is the sheer number of units, which would make it almost impossible for them to all be taken out in an attack. There are literally millions of them out there all over the country, in trucks and in cars and stored away in thousands of closets attics and basements. Just a 12 volt power source and 9 feet of wire, gets them on the air.
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Old 02-21-2013, 12:34 AM
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Lightbulb And they better be tube types

Or they won't be worth a darn.
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Old 02-27-2013, 7:13 PM
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Best CB to have is one hacked to run freeband. 555 is what I used to run many years ago. Had a groupd who all had this set up and when the regular channels got to busy, up to triple nickle. Those were the fun days. Now I have a yeasu VX-7R for just in case. Just wish there was a hack to talk on the cb band if needed.
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Old 03-03-2013, 5:09 PM
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MojaveJay, you have some very good points. I've been in CB since the later'60s. On road trips, I use my CB exclusively. I have a ham radio with me, but not used on the road.
I'm located north of the Cajon Summit, west of the I-15, in Oak Hills.
Take care!
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:35 AM
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Thumbs down 555 Crappy Band?

I didn't know it was. But then what does one expect with Crappy Band OPs. Certainly not a reason to need or want a Crappy Band radio.
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:18 PM
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CB radio works well and is a very helpful source of communication when your in any type of hauling business, going to the landfill or dump always easier and faster if you have a CB in your truck because your not trying to figure out what hand motions the guy is making when hes trying to get your truck backed in, every stone quarry, metal scrap yard, recycling center use CB radios to communicate with there customers.

They are good to have if your in any commercial business that you travel place to place for the job and im not talking about OTR drivers or anything here.
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Old 03-04-2013, 5:16 PM
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Question Not everyone

Certainly not here. No one uses Crappy Bands at drop offs, dumps, etc.. Can talk to them as the come right up to the vehicle and help from there.
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Old 03-04-2013, 9:40 PM
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guess it depends where you live but when your at a landfill where there are 5 different lines to dump what you have I bet if the ground guys would have to walk up to every truck in those 5 different spots and tell them where to go they wouldn't be as sufficient and productive as they are. Maybe you call it "CRAPPY BAND" but being that the biggest and most profitable landfill in NEPA uses "CRAPPY BAND" on a designated channel I think they know what there doing.
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Old 03-04-2013, 9:48 PM
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Not to mention that almost all the drilling companies in the Marcellus shale region have CB radios installed in there vehicles, with designated channels.
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:11 PM
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Default Really works well when Skip rolling in

But then Crappy Band is only good for 10 feet. Well, around here oil rigs have VHF or UHF, and more are going digital and encryption.
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Old 03-05-2013, 5:38 AM
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I'm not sure if your trying to rattle my chain or something here but when I'm coming in with a roll off I'm asking drivers there 3-5 miles away what kind of wait are we looking at up the dump site which is not atop a huge mountain either it runs up on 800ft in elevation and I get a clear report back from the trucks and workers up there. Our gas trucks and rigs and transport vans run vhf here to but they are still fitted with CB and its used often and it works. I'm just stating my opinion here, from what I use it for and other companies it can get the job done. That's all
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Old 03-05-2013, 8:02 AM
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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; CPU OS 6_1_2 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/536.26 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/6.0 Mobile/10B146 Safari/8536.25)

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertmac
But then Crappy Band is only good for 10 feet. Well, around here oil rigs have VHF or UHF, and more are going digital and encryption.
In the oil patch, it will stay good ol analog VHF, unless you are on a large plant site. There are large companies using VHF,UHF, and 800MHz for plant sites, but the vast Majority of drilling and rig movements are and will stay analog VHF/UHF. I have yet to hear an oil company using encryption and I extensively travel around Alberta working in the patch. On a side note there is documented use of MotoTRBO, NXDN, and P25 but not one oil company I know of in Alberta is using encryption. All road that are radio controlled in alberta is VHF analog and will always be VHF analog.
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Old 03-06-2013, 3:27 PM
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Exclamation TRBO

Well, I didn't say every oil rig was using digital or encryption. I said most are now moving that way. My son was home a couple of weeks ago and brought one of the hand held radios he is using in south eastern Alberta and south western Sask. and it was TRBO. Of course we couldn't tell if it was had encryption turned on, but in that part of the country there is probably little need at this time. He did say it was for use on and around their rigs. And he said he had not seen any Crappy Bands in any trucks he was in, just VHF radios at this time.
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Old 03-06-2013, 9:14 PM
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I have yet to see, or hear of any one in the oil patch using encrytion. Just because it may be digital does not mean encryption.

Locally I am seeing NXDN emission designators, and I know that P25 is being used north of Ft. Mac. TRBO is being used by Cenovus in Conklin. These are large 'sites'. None of these companies are using any form of encryption that I am aware of, only digital. Can you provide any examples of oil patch companies actually using Encryption, not just digital emissions? And it is not individual service providing companies, but large companies on plant/mine sites. Was your sons radio transmitting digital? Or was the TRBO radio being used in analog? Other than large mines, or large scale insitu SAGD operations that are going digital.
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Old 05-22-2013, 7:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IcomTim View Post
CB works good for me in the car because the truckers will tell you where smokey bear is !!
they don't do that anymore here in newyork and jersey these truckers stay on the midle lane and follow speeding rules they really don't relay any police report anymore unless you ask.
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Old 05-22-2013, 8:32 AM
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CB comes in handy on a long road trip or stopped tfc on the interstate to see what is happening.
I made a road trip to Florida from Indiana a few years ago had 2 and 6 meters and cb in the vehicle..contacts on 6 -1, contacts on 2- 5 or 6, on cb handfuls, and when we ran into a major stoppage on the interstate NO 2 meters ops on, CB came in handy.
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