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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 08-23-2014, 1:32 PM
Was k2ool/k1nng
   
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Default nj and ga

In NJ I hear many people on cb both north NJ and South NJ ,channels 6,11,14,ssb 38 you will definately hear chatter.
In Georgia there are many high power stations,I hear em all the way up here in NJ(where I am for the moment).
In PA off 81 its dead except for one truck stop with an advertising loop on channel 19 comes in for 1 mile.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 08-23-2014, 2:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Spankymedic7 View Post
The funny thing, those who own the GMRS repeaters as well as those who utilize them, all have our ham tickets but we still utilize the GMRS licenses more.
Its all about what your friends and family use. I live in a reasonably large city with no gmrs repeaters but there are many on the ham bands. I'm trying to setup a communications line to my parents house and if I can motivate my Dad to get his ticket we will try to find a quiet 2m or 70cm frequency for simplex. I don't plan to get into the local click for the repeaters but may chat occasionally.

You could have some ridiculous good range on simplex with a few yagi's on gmrs or ham. SSB on cb is awesome too.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 08-24-2014, 4:25 AM
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there's still a group of cb'rs around me, it's been that way for as long as i can remember, the locals i talk with are a great bunch of guys that will do just about anything for each other, i also live only 3 miles north of I80 and listen to the trucker talk, though i'm still not a ham, i have my vintage yaesu ft 101b just for listening for now, may still go for the ham thing later on, but there's plenty of cb chatter still locally that i'm i no rush for ham...............

Last edited by oldcb; 08-24-2014 at 4:34 AM..
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 08-24-2014, 12:31 PM
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I put one up for the family back in '77 when it was still Class A using an all tube Motorola repeater. Must have gone through 6 repeaters during that time with the last being a GE Mastr II with a little Regency as back up Finally shut everything down about 8 years ago and didn't renew the license. I no longer work in the biz or have access to rooftops like I did before. Cellphones pretty much eliminated the need to keep things coordinated with the kids,parents, and inlaws by the mid 90's. We just keep a pair of Vertex handhelds around for simplex if we need them anymore.

Amateur repeaters are dead here and few people that get on 2M during drive time are an extremely ignorant and foul lot. 440 is totally dead and was the last bastion of sanity with a few closed machines. GMRS started to get annoying because of all the cheap FRS/GMRS units. I no sooner would change the PL on the system and someone would pop up on the house control station. The old repeaters didn't do DPL legally and we got tired the house unit going off or some idiot with a programmable or modified amateur radio kerchunking the repeater. That crap never happend before. Finally time to pull the plugs.

Outside of the Vertex's programmed to a few local amateur repeaters and simplex should there be a storm hit the area, only other place I bother with is 10M SSB and FM with a Kenwood commercial unit programmed with a few simplex channels. Power line and EMI/RFI noise has gotten so bad, that even 10/11M on AM or Sideband is difficult to use where we live. Most of the remaining, local CB usage is all hispanic. It's hard to imagine where radio, especially amateur would end up from 40+ years ago.

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Originally Posted by W5PKY View Post
The funny thing, those who own the GMRS repeaters as well as those who utilize them, all have our ham tickets but we still utilize the GMRS licenses more.

Depending on what you need to cover, GMRS may be a better option than cb.

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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 08-24-2014, 9:23 PM
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Dawn,

Might bring a chuckle to you to know this 22 year old is currently rebuilding a high power UHF Mastr II Exec mobile and a high power VHF Mastr II mobile for a dual band repeater system. Planning on mounting them both in a smaller Moto cabinet (like what you would find the VHF Micor repeaters in) with the cans externally. Using the GE's to replace a UHF Micor...
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  #46 (permalink)  
Old 08-26-2014, 8:49 PM
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Originally Posted by W5PKY View Post
Dawn,

Might bring a chuckle to you to know this 22 year old is currently rebuilding a high power UHF Mastr II Exec mobile and a high power VHF Mastr II mobile for a dual band repeater system. Planning on mounting them both in a smaller Moto cabinet (like what you would find the VHF Micor repeaters in) with the cans externally. Using the GE's to replace a UHF Micor...
Good for you. Those M2's are great radios. The Mastr II repeaters are bomb proof. I used to service those, and well they never really needed service they just ran and ran, usually taken down after years of service for newer equipment but still fully functional and would get used in the ham or GMRS market. They don't build em like they used too... good luck with your project
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  #47 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2014, 7:51 AM
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There's a lot of CB activity in the Hartford CT area, where interstates 84 and 91 intersect. My son and I both have a CB in our cars and it's nice to be able to communicate without having to burn up cell phone minutes. We also find them useful for avoiding accidents during the morning/afternoon commute. I actually find myself spending more time on the CB than I do the 2 meter radio. Information flows a lot faster on the CB (as do the expletives unfortunately).
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  #48 (permalink)  
Old 09-02-2014, 12:23 AM
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Alive and well in my part...

I live right in the middle of a logging area, and still a ton of guys that ragchew on them around here after dark.
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Old 09-02-2014, 1:00 AM
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CB is very active around here with truck traffic and the factories around here. Not many locals though. We have two bridges that cross over from Illinois to Iowa. We also have a truckstop. The factories use several CB channels to talk to the trucks coming in to drop off or pick up. Sometimes I help the truckers with directions if they have never been through our town.
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  #50 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2014, 1:42 AM
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Dead here in Michigan.
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  #51 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2014, 3:43 PM
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Here in Australian 27MHz CB is fairly dead, UHF CB on the other hand is really active.
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  #52 (permalink)  
Old 11-14-2014, 2:39 PM
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I can't hear CB from my house.
But I only have a car antenna in the window of the house and a handheld.

I tested the antenna on the back porch outside years ago but picked up nothing.

When spring comes maybe I'll try it on the roof.

Years ago apparently the sand quarry operated on 13, but they moved to a different quarry.

The truck stops are atleast 4 miles away, even if I could hear them, I might not be able to talk to them.
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  #53 (permalink)  
Old 11-14-2014, 4:02 PM
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We live off-grid in northern Wisconsin and 11 meter sideband radios are a pretty common form of communication between those of us with year 'round off-grid homes. Cell phones don't work up here all the time, or have a poor signal most of the time. It's as common for us to pick up the mic and call one of the neighbors as it is for folks in the city to call on their cell phones.

We all monitor 27.335 MHz USB (Channel 33), which is pretty quiet most of the time, meaning communications is pretty reliable with them. When the skip gets rolling in from the SW US and Mexico we turn down the RF gain a bit to tune the skip out and we can still talk 30-40 miles base to base with decent ground plane antennas. We talk to people who live off-grid in Ontario, Canada all the time, across Lake Superior, with a beam on our 90 foot free-standing tower.

At least here it's not totally dead. It is used more in the same way it was back in the 70's when we all had call signs. And we all use our old call signs yet today, with ham radio protocol and Q codes. Nobody uses "handles" here. Every Wednesday night at 1830 Central Time we all get together on the radio for a "rag chew" and one of the operators is designated as net control for the night. We use 11 meter because only some of us have amateur licenses, and the hams do the same thing on 10 meter (although pushing more power out the back). I myself am going to get my General class license this coming January, but I'll still use 11 meter most of the time because everybody here is on that.

Very rarely do I work any DX on 11 meter SSB - although I did talk to a fellow from the south coast of England a few mornings ago when the sun was just coming up. And we all use bone stock radios with no linears, although we have them "tuned up" so they talk. Our base station radio is a Bearcat 980SSB on a Actron power supply with a homemade 1/4 wave ground plane on a 54 foot tower for listening and a homemade beam on a 90 foot tower for talking.
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Old 11-14-2014, 6:56 PM
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There is a lot of cb chatter in my area. None of it is really intelligible talk though. Just babble...mostly guys that just like to hear there own voices. I dont think I have ever heard an actual human conversation on there.
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  #55 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2014, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KIN9405 View Post
We live off-grid in northern Wisconsin and 11 meter sideband radios are a pretty common form of communication between those of us with year 'round off-grid homes.
That sounds very cool, and kind of what CB was supposed to be. Hats off to you and your neighbors!

I'm beginning to think that 2m ham sort of fills the same role, it's just that the Tech test is too much of a barrier for many people. It's not a high barrier, but it is there and slightly intimidating for some folks.
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Old 11-15-2014, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimeNumber View Post
That sounds very cool, and kind of what CB was supposed to be. Hats off to you and your neighbors!



I'm beginning to think that 2m ham sort of fills the same role, it's just that the Tech test is too much of a barrier for many people. It's not a high barrier, but it is there and slightly intimidating for some folks.

Personally I'd use 6m FM for that. I know some people in Alaska have commercial VHF stuff tied into a phone patch somewhere. They shop that set the system up set everyone up for selective calling too.


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Old 11-15-2014, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimeNumber View Post
That sounds very cool, and kind of what CB was supposed to be. Hats off to you and your neighbors!

I'm beginning to think that 2m ham sort of fills the same role, it's just that the Tech test is too much of a barrier for many people. It's not a high barrier, but it is there and slightly intimidating for some folks.
Intimidating? My ten year old grandson aced the tech exam. The math can be handled easily and the rest requires reading at the 4th or 5th grade level.
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  #58 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2014, 2:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W5PKY View Post
Personally I'd use 6m FM for that.
The folks that have 10 meter amateur radios mostly have multi-band units that cover 10, 6, 2, 70cm, and 23cm. However, 10m SSB from 28.3 to 28.5 MHz is the most popular here beyond 11m SSB. The folks who use 6m up here use SSB - from 50.1 to 50.3 USB is what is used mostly. When you really need to get out there FM does not match SSB. Both 10 and 6m are VERY popular with the folks who like to work DX here. When those bands open up you can talk to Antarctica on 5 watts of power.

In the more populated areas where there's more repeaters, both 2 and 6m FM are pretty popular, though.
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  #59 (permalink)  
Old 11-15-2014, 2:40 PM
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Im going to say if you dont have a base antenna up youre probably not going to hear much.A nice Antron 99 could help.
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  #60 (permalink)  
Old 11-22-2014, 8:18 AM
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Originally Posted by elk2370bruce View Post
Intimidating? My ten year old grandson aced the tech exam. The math can be handled easily and the rest requires reading at the 4th or 5th grade level.
I know, and I agree. It's just that for a lot of people (many of my friends in fact) (1) spending an evening brushing up for the test, (2) *gasp* _another_ gov't license!?! and paperwork, (3) "I don't want to get sucked into that crazy ham hobby," and (4, the big one) Fear of Failing The Test Publicly -- it's all enough to keep these people away. Shame they feel that way, but there it is. So... if they do radio at all, they do CB.
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