RadioReference on Facebook   RadioReference on Twitter   RadioReference Blog
 

Go Back   The RadioReference.com Forums > Topic Specific Forums > Marine Monitoring Forum

Marine Monitoring Forum This is the place to discuss monitoring marine communications

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 6:11 PM
firefgtr's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario Canada
Posts: 499
Default pon pon and pan pan

I hear this on channel #16 Buffalo N.Y. Coast Guard once and awhile, I assume they are for emergency broadcasts. Just wondering what the diffrence is between them are.
__________________
Uniden BC796D
Uniden BC246T
UVS200 Antenna fed with LMR-400 Coax
Sponsored links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 6:16 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 1,731
Default

I don't know if it is the same for both aviation and marine, but in the world of aviation, PAN PAN is transmitted before an message of urgency, and Mayday of course is imminant distress.

Not sure about pon pon though...
__________________
Colin Taranovich

-GRE PSR-500, PRO-2055
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 6:38 PM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Wichita Falls, TX
Posts: 4,129
Default

Yes they are the same
Distress signal = MAYDAY (SOS)
Urgency signal = PAN PAN (XXX)
Safety signal = SECURITE (TTT)
__________________
Tom
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 6:39 PM
seamusg's Avatar
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Grand Blanc, MI
Posts: 2,180
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by firefgtr
I hear this on channel #16 Buffalo N.Y. Coast Guard once and awhile, I assume they are for emergency broadcasts. Just wondering what the diffrence is between them are.
pon pon is a notice from the USCG of a boat with trouble, or a person in the water. It's a notice to all boaters to help if they can.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 6:44 PM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Nottingham, MD
Posts: 343
Default pon pon and pan pan

Listed below is the definition of the Pan-Pan as used by the USCG on VHF-FM marine radio. It is nice to see the opening on the Marine Forum on this site. I will checking this forum daily, since a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Hope this info helps you out.

Larry

Pan-Pan
Definition: The term used to signify an urgent communication; the second highest priority transmission.
Pronunciation: [pon-pon ] • (noun)
Sponsored links
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-29-2006, 9:25 PM
firefgtr's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario Canada
Posts: 499
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hill
Listed below is the definition of the Pan-Pan as used by the USCG on VHF-FM marine radio. It is nice to see the opening on the Marine Forum on this site. I will checking this forum daily, since a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Hope this info helps you out.

Larry

Pan-Pan
Definition: The term used to signify an urgent communication; the second highest priority transmission.
Pronunciation: [pon-pon ] • (noun)
Yes Thank-you sir. I monitor channel #16 since our fire dept which iam a member of also responds to marine calls on the upper niagara river with the USGC
__________________
Uniden BC796D
Uniden BC246T
UVS200 Antenna fed with LMR-400 Coax

Last edited by firefgtr; 06-29-2006 at 9:31 PM..
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-30-2006, 3:21 AM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Louisville, Kentucky.
Posts: 414
Default

Things are prounounced in a french-ish accent, I guess since it used to be the universal language.
__________________
Ex-pat Brit.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-30-2006, 12:54 PM
CommShrek's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 678
Default

At least they don't make me fly the White Flag of Surrender on my boat.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-30-2006, 1:07 PM
firefgtr's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario Canada
Posts: 499
Thumbs up

hey Twobravo, your Fire Fighter licence plate looks identical to the Ontario, Canada Fire Fighter plates
__________________
Uniden BC796D
Uniden BC246T
UVS200 Antenna fed with LMR-400 Coax
Sponsored links
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 06-30-2006, 1:15 PM
kb2vxa's Avatar
Completely Banned for the Greater Good
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Point Pleasant Beach, N.J.
Posts: 6,127
Default

Ahoy,

Right about the French origin and bastardized pronunciation.

Madie, pronounced mayday, distress.
Pan pan, pronounced pon pon, urgency.
Securitie, pronounced securitay, security less than urgent.

Now if I could only figure out why "bread bread" is so darn urgent. White flag HELL, raise the Jolly Roger and damn those torpedo shaped French loaves, FULL SPEED AHEAD!

By the rocket's red glare, helos up in the air, the Coast Guard's going nuts but my scanner's still there. It's the holiday weekend and madness on the waves, in the land of drunken sailors and the home of the... Darn, can somebody finish the verse? I can't think of a decent rhyme!
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 07-05-2006, 10:08 PM
CapnJon's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: West End of Poverty Knob, Da U.P. of Mi.
Posts: 262
Thumbs up

May-Day is self explainitory...

Pan-Pan is used when on the lookout for a vessel said to be in distress, or an obstruction on the water, or flares sighted...

Security is used by freighters and other boats leaving a dock, coming around a bend, heading into a river or break wall, turning around in the channel, shooting flares for training...etc.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2006, 8:28 AM
firefgtr's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario Canada
Posts: 499
Default

right on thanks for clearing this up guys
__________________
Uniden BC796D
Uniden BC246T
UVS200 Antenna fed with LMR-400 Coax
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2006, 6:36 PM
OpSec's Avatar
Analog is dead
  RadioReference Database Admininstrator
Database Admin
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,674
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnJon
Security is used by freighters and other boats leaving a dock, coming around a bend, heading into a river or break wall, turning around in the channel, shooting flares for training...etc.
Sector Lake Michigan (former Group Milwaukee) has also been using that for general safety announcements regarding various marine activities in and around the Milwaukee Harbor (i.e. Summfest)
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 07-06-2006, 6:45 PM
OpSec's Avatar
Analog is dead
  RadioReference Database Admininstrator
Database Admin
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,674
Default

Disregard...
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 07-10-2006, 3:56 PM
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Murray, KY
Posts: 18
Default

Here is the official U.S. Coast Guard rules for distress and other marine radio information signals. http://www.uscgboating.org/safety/metlife/radio.htm from a former USCG RMCM.
__________________
Light up or leave me alone (Steve Winwood)
Sponsored links
        
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 07-22-2009, 12:34 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 32
Default

Hey guys this is my first post and I wanted to point out something about the call pan-pan. The correct pronunciation is ( /ˈpæn ˈpæn/) The æ is pronounced as in bad, ban, pan or bat. Here is a link to the International Phonetic Alphabet for English that gives the correct pronunciation for most English vowels.

The USCG has mispronounced the call for years. My late wife, who was a two star U.S. Navy admiral (Rear Admiral upper half) and a holder of a PhD is languages ( among others) and was fluent in 36 different languages was constantly correcting the USCG but they live in a world of their own.

When I received my Radiotelephone First Class license with ship RADAR endorsement in 1972 we were also taught to pronounce the call as pan-pan. In amateur radio the call is pan-pan also.
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2009, 5:57 AM
firefgtr's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario Canada
Posts: 499
Thumbs up

thank you...
__________________
Uniden BC796D
Uniden BC246T
UVS200 Antenna fed with LMR-400 Coax
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2009, 10:37 AM
rfradioconsult's Avatar
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,102
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nd5y View Post
Yes they are the same
Distress signal = MAYDAY (SOS)
Urgency signal = PAN PAN (XXX)
Safety signal = SECURITE (TTT)
MAYDAY always repeated three times
PAN always repeated twice
Securite sent once
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 07-23-2009, 2:34 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Chattanooga, TN
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rfradioconsult View Post
MAYDAY always repeated three times
PAN always repeated twice
Securite sent once
The correct usage of any of the three calls is to repeat the call three times. See below.

MAYDAY

"MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY"
THIS IS (Ship or Station x3 )
MAYDAY x3 (Ship or Station)
MY POSITION IS (lat and long OR grid ref AND/OR distance and true bearing from a known location)
Nature of Distress
Nature of Assistance required
Number of people
Any other relevant information
OVER
Listen for response.
Repeat if necessary.
If other stations interupt transmit "See-Lonce MAYDAY"


PAN-PAN

"PAN-PAN, PAN-PAN, PAN-PAN"
ALL-SHIPS (STATIONS) x3 OR (name of) Coastguard Station x3
THIS IS (craft name x3)
MY POSITION IS (lat and long OR grid ref AND/OR distance and true bearing from a known location)
Nature of Distress
Nature of Assistance required
Number of people
Any other relevant information
OVER
Listen for response.
Repeat if necessary.


SECURITY or SECURITE

"Sécurité, sécurité, sécurité." (Pronounced Say-Cure-E-Tay)
All ships (stations), all ships (stations), all ships (stations).
This is (station identifier) x3
Message body x3
This is (station identifier) out.

The above are compiled from my R. L. Schrader "Electronics Communication" text book ©1968 and the operators guide to emergency communications by the U. S. Navy ©1971.
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 07-26-2009, 5:25 PM
RKG's Avatar
RKG RKG is offline
Member
   
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 927
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by seamusg View Post
pon pon is a notice from the USCG of a boat with trouble, or a person in the water. It's a notice to all boaters to help if they can.
The Pan Pan signal is not limited to Coast Guard generated transmissions. See 47 CFR sec. 80.327.
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All information here is Copyright 2012 by RadioReference.com LLC and Lindsay C. Blanton III.Ad Management by RedTyger
Copyright 2011 by RadioReference.com LLC Privacy Policy  |  Terms and Conditions