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Old 08-20-2014, 10:39 PM
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Default 2012 Honda CR-V Acc Port

I installed a 996XT and a DR-638 in my 2012 Honda CR-V this week and have one little issue. I cannot seem to find a good place to tap 12VDC power so that the radios work in the Accessory and Run Ignition positions.

On the interior fusebox under the dash I can find fuses powered when the ignition is in the Run position or on all the time but none that come on in the Accessory position.

For now I connected to a fuse that turns on in the Run position so it works while i am driving but this also means the radios cannot be used if I just have it in Accessory mode.

I also cannot seem to find a good place to tap off of from the cigar lighter sockets, the wires are all well hidden in harnesses.

Any ideas other than plugging into a cigar lighter socket?
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:17 PM
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Not sure if the Honda's have it, but the Ford and GM's I've worked on have what they call "retained accessory power" (RAP). This is the function that allows the radio, power windows, etc. to work after the vehicle is shut off and before the door is opened. May not be exactly what you are looking for, but might be close enough.

Finding a circuit that has power when this function is active might be easier. I've got a Chevy Colorado truck at work and I found the lead that would have been used for the sun roof (if it had it). I was able to take that circuit, which was taped off in a harness inside the "A" pillar, and use that. Putting a fuse in the "sun roof" slot of the fuse box provided the power I needed.
I used the feed for the ignition sense lead for a couple of Kenwood VHF and 800MHz radios.

I'm sure as an amateur you know the issues with tapping into existing wiring, specifically noise and current capacity, so I won't go into that.

I would recommend pulling off the battery directly and using a relay switched by the RAP power.

Other option is to get something like a Lind timer: 2-hour Shut Down Timer (non-fused with screw terminal connections) | Lind Electronics
You can often find them (or similar models) on e-Bay. Tap the trigger line into the ignition and the power directly off the battery. Might cost a bit more, but will be more reliable and likely less noise issues.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:46 PM
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Yes, the Honda has the retained power for the windows and radio, my radios are now connected to one of these fuses so they shut off when the door is opened.

The problem is that none of these circuits seem to work in the ACC position, just the Ignition position.
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Old 08-21-2014, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N9JIG View Post
Yes, the Honda has the retained power for the windows and radio, my radios are now connected to one of these fuses so they shut off when the door is opened.

The problem is that none of these circuits seem to work in the ACC position, just the Ignition position.
Drop the dash panel, tag the wire at the key switch, run a heavy 10 ga fused wire from the battery to a standard relay. Connect the acc wire to coil side of relay, ground the other side of the coil. Make sure to solder and 33+ tape the tagged wire. Fusing it with 3 amp fuse would be a good idea too. This way you get the best use of the acc wire without over loading the key switch and you get clean power from the battery.
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Old 08-21-2014, 12:31 AM
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I agree. Unless you can find a schematic for this vehicle, Scotty's suggestion seems like your best option.
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Old 06-21-2015, 7:33 PM
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Can you please explain in more detail what I need to do to wire to the battery. Right now I have my radios spliced together and I'm using RAP power with a fuse tap but I think I'm pushing it with 2 radios and wanting to add a third. Which is why I want to wire them in a more reliable safe way. I don't understand how to use constant power from the battery while still getting the RAP function.

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Originally Posted by mmckenna View Post
Not sure if the Honda's have it, but the Ford and GM's I've worked on have what they call "retained accessory power" (RAP). This is the function that allows the radio, power windows, etc. to work after the vehicle is shut off and before the door is opened. May not be exactly what you are looking for, but might be close enough.

Finding a circuit that has power when this function is active might be easier. I've got a Chevy Colorado truck at work and I found the lead that would have been used for the sun roof (if it had it). I was able to take that circuit, which was taped off in a harness inside the "A" pillar, and use that. Putting a fuse in the "sun roof" slot of the fuse box provided the power I needed.
I used the feed for the ignition sense lead for a couple of Kenwood VHF and 800MHz radios.

I'm sure as an amateur you know the issues with tapping into existing wiring, specifically noise and current capacity, so I won't go into that.

I would recommend pulling off the battery directly and using a relay switched by the RAP power.

Other option is to get something like a Lind timer: 2-hour Shut Down Timer (non-fused with screw terminal connections) | Lind Electronics
You can often find them (or similar models) on e-Bay. Tap the trigger line into the ignition and the power directly off the battery. Might cost a bit more, but will be more reliable and likely less noise issues.




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Old 06-21-2015, 10:09 PM
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I have since traded my CR-V in on a new 2015 Pilot. I found that the main fuse block has at least 1 accessory fuse port that worked on the ignition switch. I was able to tap that for my radios and it has worked fine.

Check for an empty fuse holder on the blco and use a voltmeter to determine if your car has one.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zane018 View Post
Can you please explain in more detail what I need to do to wire to the battery. Right now I have my radios spliced together and I'm using RAP power with a fuse tap but I think I'm pushing it with 2 radios and wanting to add a third. Which is why I want to wire them in a more reliable safe way. I don't understand how to use constant power from the battery while still getting the RAP function.

If you are going to run a 100 watt radio, you really need to be looking at #8 or #6 wire. You obviously won't be able to transmit with more than one at a time. You need to not only be concerned about amperage draw, but also voltage drop through the cable. When pulling higher current you can see some substantial voltage drop over the length of the cable.

You need to come directly off the + post of the battery with the heavy cable. Install a 40 or 50 amp fuse or circuit breaker as close as you can to the battery.

From that fuse or circuit beaker, run the cable into the cabin to a distribution block with individual fuses for each radio.

For your - connection, find a post or ground connection somewhere under the dashboard or seat. Run that to a distribution block for the radios. Don't run the - from the battery, as you may get some noise issues. While you are at it, make sure the cable coming off the battery - post to the body/frame under the hood is big enough to support everything. Some newer cars have pretty puny wiring.

For the RAP power, you need to find a suitable source under the dash. Use that to either control the "ignition sense" for the radios, or use it to control a large high current relay on the + lead coming from the battery.


In my own personal truck (Ford F150), My radios are behind the rear seat. I ran #6 cable from the battery to a 60 amp "Maxi" fuse block under the hood. From there I continued the #6 positive lead back to behind the seat. My negative lead comes off a seat mounting bolt. Everything goes to a terminal block with fused distribution to the radios. I pulled the RAP power from a source under the dash and ran that back to the rear. I use that to control a timer that in turn controls my ignition sense leads on the two radios.


Just make sure you protect all your wiring. Use the proper crimp tools and don't cut corners.

Another important thing is to make sure you have a really good ground. Don't just rely on the negative lead for the radio ground. I run a ground braid to each radio chassis and attach to a mounting bolt on the radio. It'll take some extra work, but it can prevent a lot of issues.
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Old 06-23-2015, 2:21 PM
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So let's say I had three kenwood 7180's all which are rated for 50 watt transmit. In the specs it says the radio will have a max current drain of 13amps. What do you recommend my main power supply wire size be?

Quote:
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If you are going to run a 100 watt radio, you really need to be looking at #8 or #6 wire. You obviously won't be able to transmit with more than one at a time. You need to not only be concerned about amperage draw, but also voltage drop through the cable. When pulling higher current you can see some substantial voltage drop over the length of the cable.



You need to come directly off the + post of the battery with the heavy cable. Install a 40 or 50 amp fuse or circuit breaker as close as you can to the battery.



From that fuse or circuit beaker, run the cable into the cabin to a distribution block with individual fuses for each radio.



For your - connection, find a post or ground connection somewhere under the dashboard or seat. Run that to a distribution block for the radios. Don't run the - from the battery, as you may get some noise issues. While you are at it, make sure the cable coming off the battery - post to the body/frame under the hood is big enough to support everything. Some newer cars have pretty puny wiring.



For the RAP power, you need to find a suitable source under the dash. Use that to either control the "ignition sense" for the radios, or use it to control a large high current relay on the + lead coming from the battery.





In my own personal truck (Ford F150), My radios are behind the rear seat. I ran #6 cable from the battery to a 60 amp "Maxi" fuse block under the hood. From there I continued the #6 positive lead back to behind the seat. My negative lead comes off a seat mounting bolt. Everything goes to a terminal block with fused distribution to the radios. I pulled the RAP power from a source under the dash and ran that back to the rear. I use that to control a timer that in turn controls my ignition sense leads on the two radios.





Just make sure you protect all your wiring. Use the proper crimp tools and don't cut corners.



Another important thing is to make sure you have a really good ground. Don't just rely on the negative lead for the radio ground. I run a ground braid to each radio chassis and attach to a mounting bolt on the radio. It'll take some extra work, but it can prevent a lot of issues.




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Old 06-24-2015, 1:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zane018 View Post
So let's say I had three kenwood 7180's all which are rated for 50 watt transmit. In the specs it says the radio will have a max current drain of 13amps. What do you recommend my main power supply wire size be?
I'd stick with #6.

Unlikely you'd ever be transmitting with all three radios at once, but for the sake of argument, let's say you and two of your closest friends were all feeling talkative at the same time:
13 amps x 3 radios = 39 amps.
#6 would be suitable for up to 40 amps at 20 feet with about 3% voltage drop.
Truth is, your wire length might be shorter, so that would give you a bit more headroom.

But like I said, unlikely you'd have all three radios keyed up at once.

If you go with #6, don't go to Home Depot and buy #6 THHN type wire. It'll be really stiff and hard to route. Find a stereo installer or look on line. You will really appreciate a wire with a finer strand. It's much more flexible and easier to run.
There are also specific types of cables that have insulation that will stand up better to engine compartment heat and oil/gas, etc. A decent auto parts store might have #6 cable suitable in stock. Mostly it's for people to make their own battery cables.
A marine/boat store (West Marine, etc) would also have it. It'll be expensive, but it's really the right stuff for the job.
While you are there getting the cable, make sure you get the right crimp lugs for the cable. Also, get some marine grade heat shrink tubing to cover everything up after you crimp the ends on. The marine grade heat shrink has a heat activated adhesive inside. When you heat the shrink tubing up, it'll also melt the glue and seal everything up. This is really important to help keep moisture out of the cable. This will help reduce corrosion and other issues that would cause you issues down the road.
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Old 06-24-2015, 1:49 AM
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I'd also add:
#6 might be overkill unless you -really- think you will either:
1. upgrade to a higher powered radio
or
2. Transmit with all 3 radios at once.

The cost difference between #6 and #8 or #10 (minimum I'd run) is going to be a few bucks at the most for a short run. The cost of the wire is minimal when you look at the labor that will go into the install. It's even smaller if you consider you might need to upgrade later.
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Old 06-24-2015, 2:28 AM
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Well I was going to buy the wire here, but looks like it only goes down to 8 gauge. http://www.powerwerx.com/wire-cable/...utomotive.html
And this same website only sales 8 gauge inline fuse holders.


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Old 06-24-2015, 3:06 AM
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I've purchased from Waytek Wire before, and they've been pretty good. Probably not the cheapest source, but they'll have what you need:
6GA STX Red Battery Cable 125C XLPE Cross-Link 133 / 27 - STX6-2
$0.60 a foot, + shipping.

8 gauge might be sufficient if you fuse appropriately. I still think you could find it cheaper if you shop around.
What you need is the high strand count. That's the stuff that's flexible and nice to work with. Similar to welding cable, nice and bendable, easy to work. With the vibration in a car, stiff wire can be an issue.
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Old 06-26-2015, 11:44 PM
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Does my ground wire need to be the same size as the power wire? Also where should i fuse the ground if i was to use a fuse block with ground terminals? Also if I'm using 6 or 8 gauge wire and i'm putting a relay in between the battery and fuse block how do i connect the heavy gauge wire to the relay? I can only find connectors that are for 10 gauge or smaller.

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Originally Posted by mmckenna View Post
I've purchased from Waytek Wire before, and they've been pretty good. Probably not the cheapest source, but they'll have what you need:
6GA STX Red Battery Cable 125C XLPE Cross-Link 133 / 27 - STX6-2
$0.60 a foot, + shipping.

8 gauge might be sufficient if you fuse appropriately. I still think you could find it cheaper if you shop around.
What you need is the high strand count. That's the stuff that's flexible and nice to work with. Similar to welding cable, nice and bendable, easy to work. With the vibration in a car, stiff wire can be an issue.

Last edited by zane018; 06-27-2015 at 12:18 AM..
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Old 06-27-2015, 12:48 AM
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Does my ground wire need to be the same size as the power wire?
Or bigger. Remember, it's a loop, from the battery, through the load and returning to the battery. Should be equal amounts of current flowing on the positive and negative side. Ground can also bleed off any additional energy, like static electricity, RF noise, etc. Good, low impedance ground connections are critical.

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Also where should i fuse the ground if i was to use a fuse block with ground terminals?
If you are grounding to the body/frame, you don't need a fuse on it. If the radio power cords individually have a fused negative lead, then use the included fuses as they are designed.


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Also if I'm using 6 or 8 gauge wire and i'm putting a relay in between the battery and fuse block how do i connect the heavy gauge wire to the relay? I can only find connectors that are for 10 gauge or smaller.
I suspect you might be looking at the wrong type of relay. You will need a relay that will handle the full load of the system. If you are running #6 wire and have it fused for 50 amps, then you need to make sure you have a relay that will handle 50 amps minimum. A relay that handles that much current won't have small connectors.

Relay:
http://www.waytekwire.com/products/1405/Contactors/
You need one of these that is rated for "continuous duty". Do NOT use the ones rated for intermittent duty. On the high current connection points they will probably have quarter inch studs. You'll need a #6 (or #8) lug with a 1/4 inch hole. You'll find these at an auto parts store near the battery stuff. Good hardware stores will have them in the electrical department, too.
You can use the smaller lugs on the control coil side of the relay.
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Old 06-27-2015, 9:02 PM
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I looked on Waytekwire but they only sale in bulk, I don't need that much. Do you know of any other suppliers where I can find 6 or 8 AWG connectors and quality wire? Also for the relay the 2 small studs are for ground and ignition, what do you recommend that wire size be? The one I'm looking at says the switching power must be between 10-16 VDC.


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Old 06-27-2015, 9:57 PM
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Not sure what's local to you.

We had a Tractor Supply Co. store open up here in town today. I went by and they had the #6 crimp lugs and the cable.

West Marine would have it too.

Good auto parts store will have it also.

For the ground/ignition feed to the relay coil, you shouldn't need much. #16 would be fine. Fuse it at 5 amps and you'll be good.
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Old 06-27-2015, 10:11 PM
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Ok thanks for all the help, sorry for all the questions. I'm just trying to do this correctly the first time. Does this look like a good relay?
http://www.amazon.com/PAC-Power-Rela.../dp/B007089OXO


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Not sure what's local to you.

We had a Tractor Supply Co. store open up here in town today. I went by and they had the #6 crimp lugs and the cable.

West Marine would have it too.

Good auto parts store will have it also.

For the ground/ignition feed to the relay coil, you shouldn't need much. #16 would be fine. Fuse it at 5 amps and you'll be good.




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Old 06-27-2015, 11:16 PM
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No problem on the questions, that's what we are here for. Glad we can help you out. Doing it correctly now will save you a lot of issues down the road.

The relay looks suitable. 80 amps, 12 volt coil. Should work just fine. I've never used that brand, so I can't speak to the quality. Looks like the few reviews it has are all good.
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Old 06-27-2015, 11:29 PM
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I'd add:
It's a whole hell of a lot easier to use the ignition sense leads on the radio. They draw very little current, and it would negate the need for the relay.

On the other hand, if you leave your car unattended for long periods of time, it's nice to have a positive way of disconnecting the power completely. I usually just pull my main fuse if I am leaving my truck for more than a week.
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