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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-18-2012, 2:51 AM
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Default NOAA UHF Repeaters

Do any of you know any frequencies in the UHF range that repeat weather broadcasts and alerts from the VHF 162.4 etc for the San Diego California area?
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Old 11-18-2012, 2:20 PM
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I never heard of such and with VHF reaching saturation levels I see no purpose in it.
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Old 11-18-2012, 2:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kb2vxa View Post
I never heard of such and with VHF reaching saturation levels I see no purpose in it.
Many years ago, there was a list of assigned UHF frequencies used for NOAA WX links.
I don't recall for sure but I think they were in the 406 to 420 band at that.
I think they listed them as low power links from the WFO to the areas VHF transmitter when they could not get the signal to the transmitter with more traditional methods. Don't remember for sure but I do remember seeing the UHF link frequencies listed somewhere. I also remember never hearing a signal on any of them. At least not in my area. The number of frequencies was only about five if my memory is working.
I'd guess it was at least 25 years or longer when I ran across that info. They may have been listed in one of the old Police Call books for all I remember. Not sure that is what the OP is after but the chances of hearing one instead of the actual VHF signal would be rare if they even still use them anywhere due to their low power and directional antennas.
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Old 11-18-2012, 2:49 PM
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There are some still used in the Monterey area. The Bay Area had some too but haven't heard those in a while.

Check the DB federal listings
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Old 11-18-2012, 2:49 PM
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No, but I have seen the exact opposite.
I know of at least two NOAA transmitters that in the past "repeated" on VHF a feed from the local NWS office on UHF. Both have since been replaced with telco lines or some other link.
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Old 11-18-2012, 2:57 PM
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Technically these are links, not repeaters. Here is what I compiled a few years ago, and haven't found any additional frequencies since then:

MT Fed Files: NOAA UHF Weather Links

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Old 11-18-2012, 2:57 PM
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In the Reno NV area - WWG20 - Virginia Peak 162.450/410.100 and WXK58 - Slide Mountain - 162.550/416.375
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Old 11-18-2012, 4:38 PM
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In the Monterey bay area, I can pick up at least two in the 406 to 420 range. They are using them as a link from the NWS office to the transmitters and using directional antennas, so the signal isn't very strong unless you are close to the path.
What you'd need to do in your area is set up your radio to scan that range, and make sure you have a good UHF antenna. Ideally you'd want to be in the path, or close to it, between the local NWS office and the VHF transmitter. While this is not intended as a UHF version of the standard NWS VHF broadcasts, it can work in a pinch. I certainly would not rely on it since coverage will be poor, and there isn't much keeping the NWS from changing their feeds to another means, microwave, wireline, etc.
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Old 11-18-2012, 5:27 PM
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From my remote receiver in Santa Cruz, across the bay from the NWS office in Monterey:
417.925 = 162.550
419.375 = 162.450

The receiver site is probably about 30 degrees off the path between Monterey and McQueen Ridge where the 162.550 transmitter is. I'm still getting it about -53dB into a discone.
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Old 11-21-2012, 3:42 AM
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416.375
in reno has better rx then the vhf said some times
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Old 11-21-2012, 7:47 AM
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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; U; en-US) Gecko/20081217 Vision-Browser/8.1 301x200 LG VN530)

I used to be able to pick up 1 or 2 UHF links from the Phoenix, AZ office to their transmitter site(s) several years back, but I no longer hear them. I don't recall which frequency/frequencies were used.
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Old 11-23-2012, 9:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KB7MIB View Post
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I used to be able to pick up 1 or 2 UHF links from the Phoenix, AZ office to their transmitter site(s) several years back, but I no longer hear them. I don't recall which frequency/frequencies were used.
Here are a few of the UHF links from the WSO in Phoenix.

PHX -->Globe 413.900
PHX-->Yuma 410.575
PHX-->South Mountain 415.900

These are directional signals, so the path to hear them is very narrow. I can hear them in Tempe, but the signal drops out quickly once you get into the Phoenix area.
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Old 11-24-2012, 5:09 AM
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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; U; en-US) Gecko/20081217 Vision-Browser/8.1 301x200 LG VN530)

I'm in Peoria, so I have no clue as to how I was hearing one or two of them. Unless they were bouncing off something that redirected them my way. (Billboard passive reflector?)
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Old 12-08-2012, 4:53 AM
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Does every VHF site have a UHF link?
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Old 12-08-2012, 5:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattgregg110 View Post
Does every VHF site have a UHF link?
No.

FWIW, in Vermont 410.100, CSQ, is a link to the 162.400 transmitter on Mt. Mansfield.
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Old 12-08-2012, 5:09 AM
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I have no idea if these are still in use, nor have I ever heard them but our NWS station in the next county lists these links,

National Weather Service - Lincoln National Weather Service, Lincoln IL -- Station History
Frequency Input
License Type Tone Alpha Tag Description Mode Tag 45.56000 WPPZ464 B 210.7 PL EMA NWS Lnc Lincoln National Weather Service FM Emergency Ops 410.10000 F CSQ NWS Lincoln1 UHF Link for 45.56 FM Emergency Ops 410.57500 F CSQ NWS Lincoln2 UHF Link for 45.56 FM Emergency Ops 415.90000 F CSQ NWS Lincoln3 UHF Link for 45.56 FM Emergency Ops

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Old 12-08-2012, 7:32 AM
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No. Many are Landline or Microwave vs UHF

However YMMV

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattgregg110 View Post
Does every VHF site have a UHF link?
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