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Shortwave Data Decoding Discussions regarding decoding digital signals on the HF bands, including HFDL, ALE, RTTY, CW, and others.

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2011, 9:08 AM
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I just realized I did not have any recordings of the Slot Machine up online, so this morning I made a quick video of it on 9 frequencies. The frequencies I recorded in the video were 4153, 4231.5, 4291, 6250, 6417, 6445, 8313, 8588, and 8703.5 kHz.

Often it is up on other frequnecies also, but these were the only 9 I found in a quick search before heading out the door for work this morning.

Oddity Station, XSL, Japanese Slot Machine, 9 frequencies, August 16, 2011, 1215 UTC - YouTube

T!
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2012, 8:19 AM
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Default Slot Machine

just heard it on 10425 and 10165.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2012, 12:59 AM
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I've regularly heard XSL on several frequencies between 8 and 9 MHz, but recently it seems that I'm picking it up more actively between 4 and 5 MHz. Is this just due to propagation changes?

As I was looking at the Youtube clip, I was curious--what's the tone that starts at about 0:40?

Also, what's the wide chirp that happens at around 0:43? It shows up as a yellow bar across the entire waterfall display. I hear that regularly, almost regardless of frequency or time of day up here in Alaska. I haven't identified a pattern with it, but every 10 minutes to 30 minutes I'll hear it.

Thanks for posting this Token!
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2012, 9:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaMike View Post
I've regularly heard XSL on several frequencies between 8 and 9 MHz, but recently it seems that I'm picking it up more actively between 4 and 5 MHz. Is this just due to propagation changes?

As I was looking at the Youtube clip, I was curious--what's the tone that starts at about 0:40?

Also, what's the wide chirp that happens at around 0:43? It shows up as a yellow bar across the entire waterfall display. I hear that regularly, almost regardless of frequency or time of day up here in Alaska. I haven't identified a pattern with it, but every 10 minutes to 30 minutes I'll hear it.

Thanks for posting this Token!
The 4 MHz freqs of the slot machine are up all the time, in fact almost all of its frequencies are up almost all the time. So, if you are now hearing the 4 MHz freqs it is just propagation.

At 0:40 in the video I switch to a new frequency, in this case 6250 kHz. There is a BC station carrier at about 6250.4 kHz, mixed in with the Slot Machine signal, and that is probably the tone you are talking about. There is also general rise in the background noise level and that is caused by both the BC station and a Chinese OTHR (over the horizon radar) that sometimes covers the same frequency range.

The yellow bar you are talking about at 0:43 is an ionosonde, also called a chirpsounder. Yes, they do sweep on regular and generally published times and at specific rates. There are many all around the World. However, if you really want to you can plot time vs frequency and figure out which one (or ones) you are hearing at your specific location. They sweep a rather wide range, with some going from 1 to 40 MHz. Most generally only sweep say 2 or 3 MHz to 28'ish MHz.

Here is a shot of one sweeping from about 6600 kHz to about 28000 kHz, it was probably starting much lower down, say 2 or 3 MHz, but propagation was not showing it at my location until it got up to a little over 6 MHz. In this image you can also see that there are at least 4 ionosondes active at this particular time.


T!
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Old 01-05-2012, 1:53 PM
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Wow, thanks very much Token! I really appreciate the info on ionosondes. The chirp I hear always sounds the same and seems to have the same signal strength, so I'm guessing I'm hearing only one ionosonde.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2012, 10:14 AM
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I'm pretty sure I heard it this moring on 14107 while listening to some rtty... Are people using for amateur radio now too? seems to have a pretty wide bandwidth to be accepted on ham.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2012, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kb3ggq View Post
I'm pretty sure I heard it this moring on 14107 while listening to some rtty... Are people using for amateur radio now too? seems to have a pretty wide bandwidth to be accepted on ham.
Are you talking about hearing the Slot Machine on 14107?

That is pretty unlikely, do you happen to have a recording? This would be most interesting if the waveform was indeed showing up in ham bands. Also, I was on the lower end of 20 most of the morning, and I am sure I never saw it there.

The format is a proprietary Japanese format, with a structure that has never been released, there is no software out there for hams to use it. Even the softwares out there that can demodulate it (not I did not say decode it) like Sigmira and Krypto500 are making some assumptions on what value each bit/tone is. In other words, they are assigning random values to each bit primarily to detect patterns.

T!

PS I have been watching the 10425 and 10165 frequencies since you reported maybe hearing the Slot Machine there, I have not seen it there but I have seen other digital formats there. Are you sure you are not confusing another format for the Slot Machine? A recording would go a long way towards confirmation.

Last edited by Token; 01-08-2012 at 11:07 AM..
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2012, 12:17 PM
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Possibly. On the waterfall it is multiple data streams next to each other covering pretty much my entire screen left to right. It sounds like a slot machine would sound. I don't have a recording right now, can you direct me to one and I will tell you if it is the same? It only runs for seconds at a time, simultaneously. under 20 seconds for sure.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2012, 12:23 PM
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Just found a recording, not the same. the one that I hear is much faster and actually lookes like symbols going by at extreme high speed if you didnt knw that it was just variations in the data. Mine sounds lower pitched too.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 01-08-2012, 5:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kb3ggq View Post
Possibly. On the waterfall it is multiple data streams next to each other covering pretty much my entire screen left to right. It sounds like a slot machine would sound. I don't have a recording right now, can you direct me to one and I will tell you if it is the same? It only runs for seconds at a time, simultaneously. under 20 seconds for sure.
I see you have found a recording and understand you have not been hearing the XSL/Japanese Slot Machine on 10 MHz and 20 meters, but instead another digital signal. The XSL/Japanese Slot Machine is also known as the Japanese Navy 1500 Bd QPSK Serial Modem.

How wide is your waterfall? XSL should be less than 2 kHz in width. Also, it runs for extended periods of time, normally hours on end with no break in transmission. The pattern does change when it is shifting from idle to data, but the signal stays up all the time. Each channel is a one way data transfer, so there is no need for the signal to every not transmit and go into receive mode.

Here is a recording I made this afternoon of the XSL/Slot Machine. Note the markers I have placed are 2 kHz apart and they are a good bit wider than the data portion of the signal, which should be more like 1500 Hz or less.
Oddity Station, XSL, Japanese Slot Machine, 4231.5 kHz, USB Mode, January 08, 2012, 1938 UTC - YouTube

T!
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 01-28-2012, 7:05 AM
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Here is what I thought was the slot machine. I was trying to figure out an RTTY signal this morning and heard it. Had just enough time to hit print screen before it ended. I hear this all over the band, Ham areas, commercial areas.... Is it a fax or SSTV maybe? I haven't been messing with digital long enough to know them by sound or shape. It starts all the way at the left edge of the rtty and goes all the way to 3500.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 01-28-2012, 7:07 AM
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That was at 9.02945mhz with the receiver set to cw with no filters.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 01-28-2012, 9:42 AM
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Another one, you can see how short the transmissions are.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2012, 3:01 PM
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Default B u m p

. . .
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2012, 4:24 PM
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A recording of the signal might help a good bit, those pictures are so compressed in the time domain that it would be difficult to make any kind of real guess. At a guess, very, very, rough guess from the limited information avalable, that noise has the look of a sounder or maybe a radar. But I really have almost nothing to stand on saying that.

For every report or question for ID you should include frequency, time (in UTC) and date. These facts can help to narrow down the possible signals.

By the way, the RTTY you are looking at in both those pictures? 75/850. But, both are VERY likely encrypted (most 850 Hz shift is mil).

T!
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