Any value/usefulness in an Icom IC-R1 or decades old tech?

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#1
value/usefulness in an Icom IC-R1 or decades old tech? I own one, don't know much about scanners and how advancing technology may have changed the scanner world. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thx
 

iMONITOR

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#2
value/usefulness in an Icom IC-R1 or decades old tech? I own one, don't know much about scanners and how advancing technology may have changed the scanner world. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thx
While it's not digital, but it's still good for numerous forms of monitoring!

It's good for AM/FM broadcast, commercial and military aircraft, marine, FRS/GMRS/MURS, ham radio, MW/SW, etc.

Lots of info here:
https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/IC-R1#General_Specifications

Icom IC-R1 User
ICOM IC-R1 user manual - User/Owners/Instruction Manual
 

ka3jjz

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And it could be tapped (install a discriminator tap) so it can run various digital software such as DSD or UniTrunker. It's likely to be a bit tricky, so I'd ask around to see if someone in your area has done it. I didn't see a R1 Yahoo group or one on groups.io, but there's got to be one around somewhere...perhaps info can be found on the RadioModifications Yahoo group.

Mike
 
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Understanding that this is a pre ban and skins all frequencies from 1- 1300 MHz, I have a couple questions regarding whether or not I can get a new digital scanner with the same pre ban capability (I'm not thinking so)? Second question, are frequencies beyond 1300 MHz in use, greater use if so and if so will frequencies beyond this 1300 cap become more widely used and possibly switch to from lower frequencies?
 
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Understanding that this is a pre ban and skins all frequencies from 1- 1300 MHz, I have a couple questions regarding whether or not I can get a new digital scanner with the same pre ban capability (I'm not thinking so)?
Manufacturers are still not permitted to sell radios in the USA that will cover the 800MHz cellular frequencies. That goes back to when cell phones were analog and a scanner could listen in on phone calls.
Analog cell phones are long gone, and there are no consumer scanners that would decode the calls anyway, yet the law stays on the books.

But, there really isn't much of a reason for it, there's no analog stuff, and none of the systems use the P25, DMR or NXDN standards that modern scanners support, so all you'd hear would be a loud buzzing noise.



Second question, are frequencies beyond 1300 MHz in use, greater use if so and if so will frequencies beyond this 1300 cap become more widely used and possibly switch to from lower frequencies?
They are definitely in use. Issue is it's mostly data up that high, not much in the way of channelized voice communications. So having capabilities above the 1200MHz amateur bands won't do you much good.

I have "open" radios at work, as well as test equipment that will cover up to 7gHz, and there is nothing to listen to up above 1200, unless you want to give yourself a headache, or are just interested in sniffing out transmitters.
 
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#9
Thanks for the post!

Manufacturers are still not permitted to sell radios in the USA that will cover the 800MHz cellular frequencies. That goes back to when cell phones were analog and a scanner could listen in on phone calls.
Analog cell phones are long gone, and there are no consumer scanners that would decode the calls anyway, yet the law stays on the books.

But, there really isn't much of a reason for it, there's no analog stuff, and none of the systems use the P25, DMR or NXDN standards that modern scanners support, so all you'd hear would be a loud buzzing noise.





They are definitely in use. Issue is it's mostly data up that high, not much in the way of channelized voice communications. So having capabilities above the 1200MHz amateur bands won't do you much good.

I have "open" radios at work, as well as test equipment that will cover up to 7gHz, and there is nothing to listen to up above 1200, unless you want to give yourself a headache, or are just interested in sniffing out transmitters.
I have wondered about this myself. Thanks! 7 GHz? What is at 7? :eek:
I bet that thing is expensive too! Look at what this AOR 8200D costs! It says it's unblocked and it is APCO P25 capable?! :confused:

https://www.ebay.com/i/322275802632?chn=ps

Insane!!!!! :mad: :mad: :roll: :roll:
 
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#10
I have wondered about this myself. Thanks! 7 GHz? What is at 7? :eek:
I didn't need up to 7GHz, but I'm under our IT organization. When the network guys found out I was ordering this, they wanted one to do 5.8GHz WiFi and point to point radios. Of course none of them have ever touched it and don't want to, but they like to get involved.

We have some 6GHz microwave gear. Lots of point to point stuff up there. We have some point to point stuff up at 80-90GHz, referred to as the millimeter wave band.

I bet that thing is expensive too!
I've bought new cars that were cheaper.

Look at what this AOR 8200D costs! It says it's unblocked and it is APCO P25 capable?! :confused:

https://www.ebay.com/i/322275802632?chn=ps

Insane!!!!! :mad: :mad: :roll: :roll:
I have an AOR-2300 installed up at one of my high sites. I have it on the network, and I can reach it from anywhere with internet access. It'll allow me to listen to anything from 40KHz up to above 3GHz with no breaks.
Mainly used for monitoring my own radio systems remotely. I do play with it sometimes. In reality, once you get up above the 900MHz LMR band, there's not much that you can listen to, other than a little bit of stuff in the 1.2GHz amateur radio band.
 
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#11
value/usefulness in an Icom IC-R1 or decades old tech? I own one, don't know much about scanners and how advancing technology may have changed the scanner world. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thx
Bank setup not good, scans slow, hf performance not good ,also good bet it's way off frequency by now due the the poor reference frequency design, but nice collector item, good attempt by Icom in the day to lead way in a wideband handheld
 
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#12
Expensive

I didn't need up to 7GHz, but I'm under our IT organization. When the network guys found out I was ordering this, they wanted one to do 5.8GHz WiFi and point to point radios. Of course none of them have ever touched it and don't want to, but they like to get involved.

We have some 6GHz microwave gear. Lots of point to point stuff up there. We have some point to point stuff up at 80-90GHz, referred to as the millimeter wave band.



I've bought new cars that were cheaper.



I have an AOR-2300 installed up at one of my high sites. I have it on the network, and I can reach it from anywhere with internet access. It'll allow me to listen to anything from 40KHz up to above 3GHz with no breaks.
Mainly used for monitoring my own radio systems remotely. I do play with it sometimes. In reality, once you get up above the 900MHz LMR band, there's not much that you can listen to, other than a little bit of stuff in the 1.2GHz amateur radio band.
Good stuff! :p That one ebay auction is a big flim flam... If they manage to make a sale the buyer whon't hear much. What a scam :roll: :roll:
What does 5.8 GHz sound like? Buzz? Whistle? Gunfire?
 
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