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Anyone know anything about wine?

poltergeisty

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I was given a bottle of Beringer wine for Christmas and rather than drink it I decided to write the date on it and save it for a special occasion. But I'm wondering if it's even worth it? Do certain wines age more gracefully or what ever than others? Or should I just drink this sucker? LOL I keep eyeballing it.
 

KB4MSZ

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"Better" all depends on what particular characteristic you are looking for in a given wine. Some wines age to certain stages of maturity where earthiness is enhanced, others where the acidity is reduced or certain fruity aspects can show through. This of course depends on the type of grape and the environment the wine is stored both before and after bottling.

For me, the desert wines are what I really enjoy. Desert wines such as Ports or Madeira wines "mellow" with time. That is, loose sweetness. these fortified wines are mixed from many vintages in most cases, and start to show much more earthiness (soil taste) and wood taste (from the barrel) as time goes on. In actuality, Ports and Madeira wines are both sweet desert wines at their beginning, and mellowed vintage wines after time. It all depends on when you wish to drink them, and for what reason.

Heavy desert wines such as German Auslese, Beerenauslese, and Trockenbeerenauslese are very sweet and this sweetness mellows little with age, but the flavors developed can be amazing. These wines are the product of Noble Rot, that is Botrytis Cinerea fungus. In certain weather conditions this fungus will form on the grape (usually the Riesling grape with German wines), and the wine master will carefully pick these grapes with the right coverage and penetration of the fungus. This type of wine is exceptionally sweet due to the grape being at near a raisin condition, and these wines can be exceedingly expensive in some cases. Conditions for this type of fungus occurs roughly every 10 years or so. Another amazing German desert wine is made much the same way, but the grapes are allowed to quick freeze when weather conditions permit, and the grapes are selected and pressed while still "iced". Due to the majority of the water content draining away after melting, this wine, Ice Wine, is the sweetest and most expensive of the German desert wines.

Another great desert wine is the Hungarian Tokaj wines. The Aszú wines of this type come in 6 different levels, progressing upwards in sweetness and flavor. These wines have fruity characteristics which are utterly amazing, even more so than the German wines described above. The same Noble Rot fungus is involved in their production, and their careful craftmanship and processing produces what has been branded to them as "The king of wines, the wine of kings". At the top of the Hungarian wine list is the hard to find (and afford) Tokaji Eszencia.

So, should you age it or drink it? It all depends on what you are after.
 
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WB6WQF

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I was given a bottle of Beringer wine for Christmas and rather than drink it I decided to write the date on it and save it for a special occasion. But I'm wondering if it's even worth it? Do certain wines age more gracefully or what ever than others? Or should I just drink this sucker? LOL I keep eyeballing it.
Well, sir, that depends on the particular wine. I have wines that have been in my collection for 20 years and they are excellent.

Beringer has some lower end wines that you should just drink and some estate wines that you can lay down for several years if stored properly. The type of wine, vineyard, category and other characteristics will determine your wine’s fate is you lay it down.
 

bharvey2

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I was given a bottle of Beringer wine for Christmas and rather than drink it I decided to write the date on it and save it for a special occasion. But I'm wondering if it's even worth it? Do certain wines age more gracefully or what ever than others? Or should I just drink this sucker? LOL I keep eyeballing it.

I have a question: When you unscrew the cap and give the bottle a sniff, what do you smell? Sweet? Earthy?




Okay, just kidding. I don't drink wine and know nothing about it. I expect to get skewered by those that do.
 

gordonbrittas

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As far as i am aware you can lay down ( think that's the term wine people use for storing bottles) any wine.

I'm not a big wine drinker myself,i have to drink it with water mixed if it's a red.

Did you know expensive wine is used as an investment for some individuals and some pension companies.

They lay the wine down for a number of years in expectation of the value rising.
 

zz0468

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Desert wines such as Ports or Madeira wines "mellow" with time.
I quite enjoy Madeira wines, the older the better. Best I ever had was actually at Disneyland, where one of the restaurant's there was offering up a 150 year old Madeira for about $400 a glass. It was, without question, worth every penny.
 

gordonbrittas

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I quite enjoy Madeira wines, the older the better. Best I ever had was actually at Disneyland, where one of the restaurant's there was offering up a 150 year old Madeira for about $400 a glass. It was, without question, worth every penny.
Wow,I hope you savoured the taste and didn't gulp it down at that price zz0468.

I'm curious as to whether there are many micro breweries over in the US.

It's a phenomenon that has taken off over here in the UK over the last 10 years or so.Mainly beers and some spirits but not wine due to various aspects including tradition and weather.

They can be produced in an out building next to the property ie garages.
 

bharvey2

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Wow,I hope you savoured the taste and didn't gulp it down at that price zz0468.

I'm curious as to whether there are many micro breweries over in the US.

It's a phenomenon that has taken off over here in the UK over the last 10 years or so.Mainly beers and some spirits but not wine due to various aspects including tradition and weather.

They can be produced in an out building next to the property ie garages.


Yes, micro breweries are quite plentiful in the U.S. I live on the west coast (San Francisco Bay Area) and they are all over. These days I much prefer the offerings of micro breweries over the larger commercial breweries' mass produced items.
 

KB4MSZ

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I live near a college town called Fort Collins, Colorado
Interesting. I'm going to be in Fort Collins this October for the 100th anniversary of radio station WWV, the oldest continuously operating radio station in the world. Actually, I'm glad I don't live there, as there are certain drawbacks for radio Amateurs being that close to such powerful transmitters.

How's that for a thread highjack?
 

poltergeisty

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I'm glad I don't live there, as there are certain drawbacks for radio Amateurs being that close to such powerful transmitters.

Perhaps, but there are a lot of ham radio operators out here it seems. And many repeaters. One on Horsetooth Mountain which overlooks Fort Collins.

I wonder if WWV will play anything special on the anniversary?

When you enter DIA in the main concourse, check this guy out.

 

KB4MSZ

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I doubt that, the transmissions are exclusively time and frequency standards based on their cesium atomic clock. The accuracy is less than 1 part in 10000000000000.
 

poltergeisty

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair....


I have poured the wine down the drain making the garbage disposal get drunk.
 
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