• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

BC250D Got Wet, Not Working Properly

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jsbelljr83

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Feb 4, 2004
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Pasadena
Last night I knocked my BC250D into the bathroom sink, it got submerged maybe 2" and I yanked it out right away. I took a hair dryer and held the scanner upside down and blew the water out of the speaker and tried to get as much out of the key board. It turns on but will switch back between banks 1 and 2 even though I only monitor bank 2 now. None of the keys seems to work, the back light, etc. Is my scanner ruined? Can I take the back off and leave it out in the sun for a day to try to dry it out?
 

xm15e2s

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Apr 12, 2008
Messages
7
Wow, that sucks.
Hopefully it will "snap out of it" soon.

I never bring my scanners into the bathroom because of the humidity.
 

SAR923

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Dec 19, 2002
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1,511
Leave it sit for at least three days in a dry, cool place. Don't leave it out in the sun as you're just as liable to ruin the scanner from too much heat. Assuming the water was clean, the electronics should come back to life. The main thing is don't have any power to the unit (as in remove all the batteries and/or AC power) and don't fool with the controls. You'll just migrate any residual water from one place to another by "testing" the controls before everything has had a chance to dry out.
 

slicerwizard

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Toronto, Ontario
I would recommend placing it in a warm (but not hot) area for a day or two. On top of a warm TV or monitor would be ideal. Some internal airflow would help, so take the case apart - it's just a few screws, right?

Do not power it up until it's good and dry.
 

ffexpCP

wizard of odd
Database Admin
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May 15, 2004
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589
Location
Michigan
I’ve had good luck reviving radios and pagers dropped in wintery, salty, slush puddles before and let sit for a week before they brought it to me to look at.

This is what I do:

  • Remove power source
  • Take apart
  • Clean under tap water, (soaking in a pot may help to dissolve any contaminates) carefully scrub any nasty spots
  • Soak then rinse under distilled water several times.
  • Repeat with the strongest rubbing alcohol you can find
  • Let dry thoroughly.

I amaze myself how well this works with the most fubar’ed equipment. The guys are happy they only have to pay for repair time, not a new unit.
 

linuxwrangler

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Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
233
Location
Contra Costa County, CA
flexpCP's advice is pretty spot-on. I've revived a thing or two myself.

I'm a bit wary of the alcohol. Usually it's OK and it helps dry things but sometimes it's hard on plastics and labeling. If you do go that route you can use denatured from the hardware store or 99% from the drug-store.

The OP mentioned a hair-dryer. Tempting, I know, but around metal, water+heat=corrosion. Be patient and let it air-dry. I speak from experience.
 

linuxwrangler

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Nov 6, 2006
Messages
233
Location
Contra Costa County, CA
So is it working again? Inquiring minds want to know.

Lest anyone think that water is automatically bad for electronics, I was going through boxes of papers from my dad's estate this weekend and ran across the official instructions from the 70's describing how to wash your Tektronix oscilloscope. The procedure, involving washing out the insides with water and soap, was a standard maintenance operation. You could even buy special "ovens" which circulated slightly warmed (125F) air to speed drying of your 'scope.

If I get time, I'll scan and post it for amusement.
 

Gbcue

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2008
Messages
132
Location
CA
Get a bunch of rice and place the scanner in it for a few days. The rice should absorb the water vapor remaining.
 
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