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Blue LEDs to reset tired truckers' body clocks

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iMONITOR

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This is why you stay up all night listening to your Uniden BCD396T! :cool:



Blue LEDs to reset tired truckers' body clocks

Eerie blue LEDs in truck cabs and truck stops could be the key to reducing accidents caused by drowsy drivers, say US researchers. They say bathing night drivers in the right light can increase their alertness by resetting their body clocks.

The scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, are testing blue LEDs that shine light at particular wavelengths that convince the brain it is morning, they say, resetting the body's natural clock.

That could help reduce the number of accidents that occur when people drive through the night. Nearly 30% of all fatal accidents involving large trucks in the US happen during the hours of darkness, according to a recent report by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, while fatigue causes half of all truck accidents in the early hours on UK motorways.
Wakey wakey

"The concept of using light to boost alertness is well established [in other areas]," says Mariana Figueiro, co-author of a new white paper published by the institute's lighting research centre.

"Translating that understanding into a practical application is the next challenge." Drivers could take 30-minute "light showers" in truck stops fitted with similar lights, or the lights could be fitted into truck cabs.

Figueiro is currently investigating how the blue light affects daytime alertness of sleep-deprived and non-sleep-deprived subjects. "These findings will also be applicable to transportation applications, since the accident rates during the afternoon hours are still higher than in the morning hours," says Figueiro.

Results so far show a clear effect on the brain activity of test subjects of both kinds, she adds. "After 45 minutes there is a clear effect," says Figueiro. "You start to see a beautiful increase in brain activity in the 300 milliseconds response, which is a measure of alertness." The current test box emits diffuse light at 470 nanometres, with an intensity of 40 lux when measured at the eye.
Light work

Figueiro plans experiments on a driving simulator using different light spectra, of 450 and 470nm, and intensities of 2.5, 5 and 7.5 lux, to see which combination works best without obscuring the driver's view of the road.

An alternative is to build goggles with blue LEDs for the driver to wear before setting off. Figueiro is already designing such equipment for people with Alzheimer's that will change their circadian rhythms to reduce their nocturnal alertness and help them to sleep at night.

Car manufacturers already market systems to warn or wake drowsy drivers. They use measures of eye movements, blink rates or small steering-wheel movements to tell if a driver is losing alertness. But preventing drowsiness in the first place would be more effective.

Jim Horne, director of the sleep research centre at Loughborough University, UK, says changing the body's clock is possible, but difficult in short periods. "Shifting it by eight hours takes at least 10 days, and very few people are capable of doing that," he says.

-source-
New Scientist Tech
http://technology.newscientist.com/article/dn13491-blue-leds-to-reset-tired-truckers-body-clocks.html
 

Shortwavewave

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You know this kinda works on me.

Has anyone felt as if they could swim in a Pool for ever? I know the blue of a pool and blue of a LED are different wavelenghts but who knows, and I know its not the water because I never went swimming in a lake for that long.

Also theres blue lights on my Connex CB Radio, I talk on that one the most.(yeah I know I dont need anyone to tell me its illegal!!!)
 

Zaratsu

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my car has several blue LEDs that light up areas on the interior while driving at night.

There is one in the interior light cluster that shines down on the shifter and a few that shine out from under the different dash-board components. They are not distracting at all, and so dim that most people dont notice them until you point them out. What it does do, is to outline the different surfaces in the cabin which may reduce fatigue from your eyes/brain not trying to constantly "redraw" the edges of everything in your head all the time. It is impossible to miss a button, switch, or lever, and it gives the interior a very nice atmosphere as well.
 

iMONITOR

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I've never noticed blue light having an effect on me, unless I saw it in my rear view mirror! :confused:

What I have noticed is that the red/orange lighting used on some instrument panels, like Pontiac's, bothers me. It looks fuzzy, not sharp and detailed like the blue/green does.
 

jimyleg

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It makes perfect sense, the key would be.. Using the correct wavelengths of "light". The brain's neuro pathways would become active and begin firing, causing you to behave as if it were day time. Which is associated with activity and alertness. BUT it may be more difficult than they expect. The brain has been molded for a long time... The neurons that detect night and day would need to be really tricked.. And after all, if your fatigued or ired to begin with your still not going to be 100%.
 

kb2vxa

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I got white line fever and the busted CB blues,
Pulled in the truck stop just to pay my dues.
Rolled out with a brand new Galaxy and a roger beep,
Now where be Smokey?
Goin' so fast I make jet pilots weep!

Just give me weed, whites and wine... and I'll be rollin'.
 
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