• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Comet HT-55 155/465 dual band duck

Status
Not open for further replies.

hertzian

Member
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
2,604
The Comet HT-55 is an interesting 8-inch long dual-band duck optimized for the commercial bands near 155 and 465 mhz. You can transmit into it on those bands, although you are limited to 5 watts.

Of course it is rated to receive from 118-960mhz, but then again, so is a paperclip. :)

Mechanically it is very thin, and being only 8 inches long it isn't too much of a problem on the belt. However, you do want to be careful so you don't bend it right over at the end of the housing.

But does it really make a difference? Yes, but not as much as going to a much longer antenna, such as a Diamond RH-77CA. Consider the improvement on the commercial bands to be about half-way between an amateur 2m/440 duck, and a full quarter-wave. When comparing a similar amateur antenna, the Diamond RH-519 to the Comet HT55, when tuning NOAA on 162 mhz, the difference was immediately obvious.

On UHF, the improvement in the commercial bands was noticeable, but not as great as it was on VHF.

So, if a short 6-8 inch flexible duck is what you like, and you prefer an antenna tuned to the commercial vhf/uhf bands, then the HT-55 is a strong contender.

BUT, being tuned to the commercial bands is NOT a great idea if you are already suffering from NOAA or pager overload / desense already. In this case, the HT-55 will only make the situation worse.

So the reasons to choose the HT-55 are:

* You prefer a small flexible whip
* You like the improved performance in the commercial 150/465 bands
* You are NOT already suffering from NOAA or pager overload.
* You are not expecting full quarter-wave performance.
* All other bands are just basically untuned, like most other "wide band" rx-only antennas.
 

hertzian

Member
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
2,604
Forgot to mention that it seems to only be available with an SMA connector.
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2004
Messages
1,224
Location
PNW
Excellent review! Picked up one of these recently and paired it with an Icom R6. It does a really good job bringing in fringe VHF and UHF signals for me. One surprise was that its VHF air band performance is pretty darn good, too. Makes for a nice & lightweight monitoring package.
 

SCPD

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
65,126
Location
Virginia
Scannermaster shows that they will be carrying the BNC version soon.

I like the review, it's nice to have some background to different products while I search around the nets for them.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top