• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Coming back to amateur radio

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#1
Hello everyone. Lately I've been looking more seriously into getting an amateur radio license after several years away from the hobby. When I was in junior high school many years ago and through high school and part of college I had a general class license that expired around the year 2000. I have never really lost interest completely and it has always been in the back of my mind, but lately I have wondered if I could pass the exam and regain my license. It seems to me, given the low cost and low barrier to entry, it's worth trying.

I have read that as a past general class operator, I can regain a general class ticket by passing the Technician test. Is this correct? I would definitely need to brush up on electronic theory, and I know there is a lot to catch up on with regard to digital modes of communication. But, I seem to recall passing the general class exam fairly easily at age 13. I never got past that, due to my lackluster math ability, which kept me from advancing, but the code tests were a piece of cake, even though there is no code requirement anymore.
 
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
261
Location
North Texas
#2
If you are in the USA
You need contact a VE Team and they will let you know what you need
To get your Gen class Lic

Part of a article
In a wide-ranging Report and Order (R&O) released June 9 that takes various proceedings into consideration, the FCC has revised the Amateur Service Part 97 rules to grant credit for written examination elements 3 (General) and 4 (Amateur Extra) to holders of “expired licenses that required passage of those elements.” The FCC will require former licensees — those falling outside the 2-year grace period — to pass Element 2 (Technician) in order to be relicensed, however. The Commission declined to give examination credit to the holder of an expired Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination (CSCE) or to extend its validity to the holder’s lifetime.
If you would like some links for study stuff let me know.
You can search the ARRL web site for VEs also W5YI : Resources for Amateur & Commercial Radio
Or look up local clubs and ask about what you need to do
A old licence would be great.
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
690
Location
San Diego, CA
#4
Hello everyone. Lately I've been looking more seriously into getting an amateur radio license after several years away from the hobby. When I was in junior high school many years ago and through high school and part of college I had a general class license that expired around the year 2000. I have never really lost interest completely and it has always been in the back of my mind, but lately I have wondered if I could pass the exam and regain my license. It seems to me, given the low cost and low barrier to entry, it's worth trying.

I have read that as a past general class operator, I can regain a general class ticket by passing the Technician test. Is this correct? I would definitely need to brush up on electronic theory, and I know there is a lot to catch up on with regard to digital modes of communication. But, I seem to recall passing the general class exam fairly easily at age 13. I never got past that, due to my lackluster math ability, which kept me from advancing, but the code tests were a piece of cake, even though there is no code requirement anymore.
Yes, this is true. However, it is the responsibility of the applicant to furnish adequate proof of the former license. Adequate proof might be a copy of the expired license, the expired license appearing in the FCC database, of a copy of a page from a call book showing the expired license and class.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2011
Messages
1,232
Location
Echo Mike Two-Seven
#5
Welcome to the forums and back to amateur radio!

Even if you end up having to re-take the two exams or all three exams it is not so hard. I had ZERO electronic theory experience and to this day struggle with any kind of advanced mathematics equations.

Hopefully you can find proof your last license though and go right back to General status after passing the Tech exam.

Good luck and 73!
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#6
Thanks for the kind words! I do have the original copy of my licence so furnishing proof would not be hard. I will likely purchase the ARRL study guides and refresh my memory. Most study guides I see online are really just sample tests which isn't what I'm looking for. Heck, if it goes well I may try for extra.

I will definitely do some reading here. Unfortunately my station equipment is long gone except for the Hallicrafters SX71 receiver my uncle gave me when I was 10 or 11.

Glad to see the hobby is still around. I've read some disappointing anecdotes that paint a gloomy picture. Hope to find they aren't true.
 

jbantennaman

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Nov 10, 2009
Messages
72
#7
I'm not really sure what you are asking or just telling.
The ability to pay has nothing to do with getting a license.
The Laurel Amateur Radio Club gives FREE VE Test Exams.

Yes if you had a General, you can get it back by passing the TECH.
The TECH is not hard, I had a 5yr old boy pass it a couple of years ago at a HAM IN A Day - Ham Cram. There is no MATH, it's all memorization. Match question 1 with answer B. etc...

There is no Electronic's theory, unless you consider knowing what happens when you have 3 capacitors in parallel or 3 resistors in series.
Just think about a garden hose and what happens when you reduce the amount of flow or add more garden hoses.

The rest is all the rules and the band plan.
These are the most important parts.

Don't worry about digital modes - unless that is what chokes you chicken.
Plan on buying a good 50 watt FM UHF / VHF transceiver, a good 100 watt HF radio and a couple of antenna's.. I probably have more coax than I need, but never have enough when I want to do something special - like Field Days or a special event station. 500' for me is a minimum amount of coax to have on hand. I probably have over 1000' of LMR 400 and Belden 9913F7

Same is true with power supplies, PL connectors, soldering irons, crimping tools.
Amateur Radio is very expensive, are you sure you want to get back into it?
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#8
As far as tools go, I have plenty. I've browsed at some newer used gear, not cheap, but not out of reach. I'm actually more interested in digital modes this time around. So yes, it gets pricey but not out of reach.

My point about cost was referring to getting licenced. It seems to me that's the easy part.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2011
Messages
1,232
Location
Echo Mike Two-Seven
#11
Thanks for the kind words! I do have the original copy of my licence so furnishing proof would not be hard. I will likely purchase the ARRL study guides and refresh my memory. Most study guides I see online are really just sample tests which isn't what I'm looking for. Heck, if it goes well I may try for extra.

I will definitely do some reading here. Unfortunately my station equipment is long gone except for the Hallicrafters SX71 receiver my uncle gave me when I was 10 or 11.

Glad to see the hobby is still around. I've read some disappointing anecdotes that paint a gloomy picture. Hope to find they aren't true.
The hobby is great! Of course it is what you make of it...

I would stay away from the problem frequencies, i.e. 7.188, 7.200, 14.313 and one or two on 80 meters that escape me right now. For the one year I have been operating, I can't say I have been treated badly on HF, most operators have been very welcoming and inviting. There has been a jammer or two screw with a net every once and awhile, but for the most part it is civilized on the HF bands. Repeaters can get iffy, just because it is easy for a idiot jammier to get a $25 Baofeng and play with his Chicom siren and what not. Luckily in my area, the repeaters are pretty well policed and incidents are few and far between.

I would recommend HamStudy.org for practice tests. I used Gordon West's books, they worked great for me. I hear the ARRL's books are good too though.

If you can or are into it, visit with your local club. Many mentors and Elmers to be found there. Also makes for a great environment to meet with like minded people who share the same interest/hobby.

Anyhow, looking forward to hearing about your journey and maybe catching you on the air someday!
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#12
Thanks. I seem to recall 14.313 being a problem 25 years ago when I was active. I guess some things don't change! There are several clubs near me, perhaps I will look into finding one to attend.
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#13
Passed my tech test tonight. Was told I got a perfect score. I provided proof of my past general class licence and was approved for the upgrade to general.

Don't yet have any gear but will start looking. I plan on reviewing the general class study guide, then starting in on the extra class exam.

I was never previously active on 160 meters. Would love to try it but living in an apartment it probably won't happen. I will most certainly get on HF again at some point.

I'm also very interested in 6 meter and 2 meter SSB and CW, as well as digital and satellite modes. Also curious about the UHF and above bands where little to no purpose built amateur gear is available, like 900 MHZ.
 
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
261
Location
North Texas
#14
Congrats Welcome Back to the hobby!
A rig like a yaesu 857d will give you a lot of bands .
There are remote stations , digital Hf and lots to look at.
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
15
#15
Thanks! That radio looks good but it seems a bit small. It's impressive how much it packs into its small size.

I don't know that I really need the latest and greatest. Previously I had a Kenwood ts-140s that met all my needs. I am not opposed to buying used gear and I have noticed that no one really makes multimode VHF UHF transceiver is anymore. I figure bare minimum I'll need a power supply, radio, antenna tuner, and antenna. I still have a lot of research to do and I'm not sure if older equipment would be able to keep up with the newer digital modes and satellite stuff.
 
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
3,182
Location
So Cali
#16
One reason for taking the Tech test is to be familiar with the later rule changes.

Al tho we should keep up on all the rule changes, to bad we do not get updated like our computers!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top