• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

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cq

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#1
had my radio a month i only made contact with one person about 30 miles away i call CQ every night no one answers i know my rig is working what am i doing wrong? i sometimes hear other hams talking but i don't want to interrupt them. i never hear anyone else calling cq i am in a rural area not many hams i guess
 
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#2
What band(s), mode(s), and perhaps even frequencies are you trying to use? Some bands, CQ is not the normal way to initiate a contact. On several bands, timing is very important since some are active at night while others are active during the day. Also your station specifics are also important in how you're getting out. Using the wrong antenna (one that's too high or too low or even pointed the wrong direction) can be critical in making a contact.

If you're using VHF and/or UHF, you can't just dial up any frequency and expect to get a contact. Those bands are often channelized (especially on FM) and unless you're on the correct frequency or frequency pair you won't have much luck at all. Also, most often you'll need to use the correct PL tone or other users won't hear you.

Using a typical hand-held radio will generally give you poor results since the range is so short, especially if you're not outside in an area with minimal obstructions. Providing details on your station and how and when you operate can help us help you try to get better results.
 
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#5
OK, you're on the standard dual band ham radio. There should be several repeaters around for you to talk on. This may be a good place to start in finding them (Somerset County, New Jersey (NJ) Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference). Ignore the D-Star since your radio won't work there. Also ignore the NJ-TRBO Linked Amateur Radio Network for the same reason. Program in the 2m and 70cm frequencies and include the tone required for repeater access. You may want to verify both the frequency and tone by searching for the repeater(s) in question to make sure you have the most current information as they can change without notice (the repeater's owner's web page is probably the most accurate).

Next, don't try to transmit or call CQ right away. Listen to them for several days to see how those repeaters work. Some have a few users that monitor nearly all the time while other users are only there during the typical drive times. There probably are also nets that are designed for specific purposes and topics outside of that purpose are generally not welcome. Also some nets are closed to authorized users (only club members, only RACES members, or the like) while others are open to everyone. For the open nets, listen closely for how they wish users to check in and when the various types of users are to check in. That may be by members vs. non-members, by location, by type of station (low power, short time users, etc.) and check in as appropriate. They may wish for you to say your call sign normally (just the call sign), say it using the phonetic alphabet (Alpha for A, etc.) and may or may not want other information, such as name, location, etc.

Some groups welcome new users easily, while others are not as welcoming. You can often join either type if you do lots of listening to get to know the folks, topics, and how they operate and after monitoring for a long time (some think it's a way too long of a time) and during a pause, give your call and state you have a question, comment, or other appropriate thing to add to their conversation. Just make sure that your question, comment, or whatever is on topic and appropriate with how the group normally talks.

Be aware that you are not a member, friend, or much more than a tolerated guest initially so be careful about how you handle yourself. After a while they'll get to know you and accept you as a part of the group and then you can join in on some of the less formal conversations (joking around, friendly name calling, etc.),

Many repeaters are owned or at least sponsored by clubs so it is highly recommended that you attempt to attend one or more of the local clubs. That will allow you to actually meet the folks and give you a head start on being accepted as part of the groups and conversations. This may be one in your area http://www.qsl.net/scars/

Some of this may sound petty and cliquish, and quite frankly some is. But you must remember that often the long running groups on the repeaters have had their share of folks who have only one goal, and that's to disrupt the conversations so those groups often do make it difficult for folks to join. If you put in the time and effort to many of those groups it will be well worth it though.
 

jwt873

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#6
Many repeaters are owned or at least sponsored by clubs so it is highly recommended that you attempt to attend one or more of the local clubs. That will allow you to actually meet the folks and give you a head start on being accepted as part of the groups and conversations. This may be one in your area Somerset County Amateur Radio Society
Yes... Unlike HF, most 2m and 70cm FM communication is carried out on repeaters. These are usually maintained by clubs.

Get involved with the local clubs and you'll meet lots of people that you will eventually chat with.

Just last year I got interested in DMR. I didn't really know any of the people using the local DMR repeater. I joined the club, and started attending their meetings. Now I know everyone that uses the repeater and always have something to talk about when I hear them, or they hear me. They aren't just voices on my radio.. I know them personally.

And, a lot of repeater clubs have dues.. Insurance, maintenance, improvements and in some cases site rental fees are an issue and many clubs obtain funding for this from the members. Using a repeater without being a member or paying dues can make you somewhat unpopular.
 
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Sep 22, 2016
Messages
58
Location
franklin new jersey
#8
wow thats a lot to remember lol . i do listen quite a lot nights mostly, but usually hardly anyone is talking except the repeaters, giving their call signs. i do hear a few folks talking in the am, they sound like they are mobile i don't want to break in on their private conversations . i just scan 145.190 - 446.000. i do cq when no one is using those frequencies . must not be many hams in my area or at least not friendly ones like you guys /gals. as you suggest i will listen to the repeaters instead of scanning thanks for the info 73
 
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Messages
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Newnan, GA
#9
Yes, put the local repeaters in your memory bank and then scan just them, Will be much faster than scanning two whole bands. Keep notes on which repeaters you actually hear talk on and which just ID. Some listed repeaters may no longer be functioning and can be removed from your scan list.
 

jaspence

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Michigan
#11
Calling CQ

CQ is not generally used on repeaters, which may also cause some others to ignore you. If you were listening a repeater at 147.04, the format would be to say your call sign followed by "listening on the 147.04" or just "listening 04". Scanning all of the frequencies will miss calls for two reasons. First, not all of the 2 meter or 440 bands are used for repeater traffic ( check this url- Band Plan), and scanning that many frequencies will cause you to miss traffic. As mentioned, program your radio for local frequencies and learn how to lock out individual stations so your scan can by pass a conversation.
 
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Sep 22, 2016
Messages
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franklin new jersey
#12
CQ is not generally used on repeaters, which may also cause some others to ignore you. If you were listening a repeater at 147.04, the format would be to say your call sign followed by "listening on the 147.04" or just "listening 04". Scanning all of the frequencies will miss calls for two reasons. First, not all of the 2 meter or 440 bands are used for repeater traffic ( check this url- Band Plan), and scanning that many frequencies will cause you to miss traffic. As mentioned, program your radio for local frequencies and learn how to lock out individual stations so your scan can by pass a conversation.
wow there is a lot to learn here thanks jaspence 73
 
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