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Dog shot and killed after biting officer

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Scan-Denver

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DENVER - Police say that an officer was taken to the hospital Sunday morning after being bitten on the arm by a Pit Bull.

The dog attack happened inside the Driftwood Motel at 1443 Oneida St., according to police.

The Pit Bull was shot and killed by three officers. The dog's body is in the process of being removed from the hotel.

The condition and identity of the officers was not immediately released.
 

scanlist

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Service weapon trumps bad azz puppy every time.

Boulder had a similiar situation last week.

Phil.

Police shoot pit bull in park

Dog charged officer, reportedly bit two people

By Eric Schmidt, Camera Staff Writer
June 5, 2006

Boulder police shot and killed a pit bull at Eben G. Fine Park on Sunday following reports the dog bit two people and charged an officer.

Police were called to the popular tubing and picnic spot along Boulder Creek about 2:30 p.m. on reports of an aggressive dog at large, Sgt. Kurt Matthews said. He said the dog had bitten two people at the park and ran toward an officer with its teeth bared.


Officer Jeremy McGee yelled at the dog to stay back, and then at its owner to restrain the animal, which continued to advance, police spokeswoman Julie Brooks said. McGee then fired two shots, killing the dog.

"Our officers' safety comes first," Brooks said. "The officer would not have fired if he did not feel threatened by the animal. I feel confident that he would not have discharged his firearm if he didn't feel he had to."

The dog's owner, Sarah Mallory, of Erie, cried as police interviewed witnesses to the shooting. Her clothing was stained with blood.

"They killed my dog," Mallory said. "She wasn't going to do anything, and they shot her."

Mallory said the female pit bull, Nakita, was abused as a puppy, making her timid and scared of men. She said Nakita got off her leash and was probably confused and afraid, but not vicious.

The dog "needed a little bit of help," but was responding to training, Mallory said.

"She was a good dog," she said. "I took her everywhere with me and never had any problems. She was learning so much, and now I'm covered in her (expletive) blood."

Brooks, the police spokeswoman, said McGee will remain on duty following the incident. She said the two dog bite victims were treated at the scene.

Mallory, 18, was cited for having a dog at large and an aggressive animal prohibited, Brooks said.

Gwen Miale and Lauren Hohenstein, both of Boulder, walked their dogs through the park Sunday. They questioned the officer's use of force in a crowded, public place.

"I think our biggest fear is just unloading a round in a park," Hohenstein said.

Miale said she understands the need to control an aggressive dog, but she wonders why police could not have tranquilized the animal instead of shooting it.

"They should have something to handle something like this," she said. "Can you imagine how traumatic it must have been for all these kids to see?"

But Teresa Fischer said she doesn't fault the officer's response. The Berthoud resident said she was at a birthday party at the park and encouraged victims to call authorities after the dog lunged three times at people walking by.

"In my opinion, he had no other choice unless he wanted to be missing part of his leg," Fischer said. "I love dogs, but he was offered no choice. All these people around could have been attacked."
 

datainmotion

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scanlist said:
Gwen Miale and Lauren Hohenstein, both of Boulder, walked their dogs through the park Sunday. They questioned the officer's use of force in a crowded, public place.

"I think our biggest fear is just unloading a round in a park," Hohenstein said.

Miale said she understands the need to control an aggressive dog, but she wonders why police could not have tranquilized the animal instead of shooting it.

"They should have something to handle something like this," she said. "Can you imagine how traumatic it must have been for all these kids to see?"
I love Boulderites "armchair quarterbacking" these situations:

Don't question the use of force unless you were directly involved in the situation or were the officer.
As far as officer's carrying tranquilizers - that's just plain ridiculous.
And in regards to the statement about "how traumatic it must have been for all these kids to see" - imagine how traumatic it would hve been if one of those same kids had been mauled.
What idiots. Go back to your Granola, you Birkenstock wearing freaks.

Wow, I feel much better now. :D
 
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This is one reason why I carry when hiking. I'm more worried about mountain lions and pit bulls than anything else.

You gotta love the imbecile who wondered why the cop couldn't "tranquilize" the dog. Sure, with everything else a cop carries, why not also carry a tranquilizer gun?

Any dog approaching me that appears to be vicious and not under control will probably face the same fate as these.
 

Scan-Denver

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Not to mention if the Boulderite would have had his animal on a leash and in control and if the Denverite wouldn't have had the animal in Denver to begin with as it is unlawful to have a pitbull in the city limits - then probably these two incidents would never have happened.
 

RISC777

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datainmotion said:
And in regards to the statement about "how traumatic it must have been for all these kids to see" - imagine how traumatic it would hve been if one of those same kids had been mauled.
Traumatic? I know some, a group, that had an un-named city's PD officers pull their firearms because of an air-soft pistol. Stated to me, "If they had made the wrong move, they would have been shot." Not one realized that at the time. The majority seem totally unconcerned about it after the fact. So, (opinion only) they'd have to be pretty young to be traumatized.

I can still remember that Illinois state patrol officer's nickel plated .357 . . .
 
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