• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

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Eval. of the New So. NV Scanner Book 5th Ed.

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TOUGHLIFE

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Within the last few days the new 5th Edition of the Southern Nevada Radio Scanner Book was released for sale and observed both at Amateur Electronics Supply in LV (702-647-3114 and 800-634-6227)and at Radio World in Boulder City, Nevada (702-294-2666). Here is a review of what is in it and my comments. The cover hits the highlights as to what the book contains as in the past and the welcome page is an introduction into monitoring in the LV area, legal comments, and other remarks. The table of contents follows which adequately covers the different sections of the book. Next, is the LVMPD frequency database which has 56 listings with some updates noted from the last edition. This table covers repeater outputs, and simplex for the voice channels. Next is a detailed presentation of the planned M/A Com Open Sky system with some comments about potential interoperability problems which I agree with but will not comment further on. Frequencies that the agency is authorized to use in both the 700 and 800 MHz spectrum are specifically mentioned with site information. Radio codes and signals follow with incident disposition codes added and the phonetic alphabet. LVMPD unit type IDs' follow along with three beat and command related area maps. The NLVPD comes next with very good details showing the shift to the SNACC trunking system and information as to how the old EDACS trunking system is being utilized. A beat map follows for the NLVPD.
Next is the Boulder City PD, FD, and local government section with no new changes noted. Mesquite follows for police, fire and local government. Radio World's advertisement for scanner programming is also showing and the only ad in the book.
Page 13 begins the SNACC trunking system which is the largest one traffic wise in the county. A lengthy list of the users is showing as well as the very detailed listings for frequencies and sites and programming tips. It is still a simulcast system but this could change at any time so the list of thirty sites is very welcome and will come in handy when the shift to smartzone happens. A table of 209 talk group IDs' first in agency order follows and a reverse listing by talk groups comes next which is most useful if you are searching a system and have no idea of what a particular ID is used for and its agency.
A detailed list of fire stations follows with address information and equipement for most of them for the LVFD, Clark Co FD both urban and rural (rural section is new), NLVFD, and Henderson FD.
Emergency Medical Services comes next covering AMR and Medic West ambulance companies with VHF and UHF frequency and channel use information. Special medical dispatch codes comes next which tells you the type of medical call the unit is being sent on.
The level of response is also given (Alpha thru Echo). Hospital waiting times matched with the color code list also follows.
Next is a database presention of conventional frequencies used by local gov't. entities and numerous updates are noted. A Henderson PD beat map follows with radio codes unique to Henderson. Information concerning the area boundary changes for patrol units is also discussed. The old system was better in my opinion but logic does not usually prevail in government.
Next is the highly detailed information for the NSRS (Nevada Shared Radio System) which is maintained by the NV DOT but used by many agencies. A list of radio sites with exact LCN order for frequencies shows and some changes are noted. A database listing of 317 talk groups follows in order by agency first and a reverse order by talk group ID which again makes searching easier. Numerous changes and additions are noted including commonly used patch IDs' that NHP often use. They come up so often that I have added them to my scan lists used for the NSRS so I will not likely miss what I want to hear.
Next comes the DPS radio call breakdown for types of units found within the different DPS divisions. An updated radio code list follows and there were numerous changes made in the last few months. Criminal history radio codes follow along with the newer and older incident disposition codes. Some additions are noted and some agencies use codes from both lists. Agency, both DPS and non-DPS radio call designators follow. DPS patrol beat codes matched with areas follows. The licensed DPS VHF backup system is presented next with an implied suggestion to monitor 155.7900 and the reason is obvious for most but I shall let you decide why you want to listen.
Frequency information for other Nevada State agencies follows with some additions. Not all state traffic is found on the NSRS. Some agencies use both.
Selected US Gov't. radios channels follow matched with agency and use. Many new additions are showing for wildland firefighting and this is most welcome for those who enjoy monitoring such activity. Next is the trunking system used for most non-aviation activities at Nellis AFB but you will need a digital scanner to hear it. The aviation frequencies used at Nellis come next, both VHF and UHF with airshow information with a reminder of when the next show is (Nov 11th and 12th). Commercial and general aviation frequencies follow in detail for all the area airports, air traffic control centers (LA, Oakland, and Salt Lake). Aircraft monitoring tips comes next with frequencies for AIRINC (Aeronautical Inc.) which provides contract communications for many of the world's airlines. This can get most interesting during times of crisis.
Ground transport radio frequencies follows for railroads, the LV Monorail (it has it operational problems with unusual radio traffic at times), and taxis and limos.
Motor-Sports comes next with race freqs. for many teams outside of NASCAR and a very detailed listing of freqs. used for operational purposes at the LV Motor Speedway.
Frequencies for Airlines (non-aviation) follows. Golf course and country club freqs. follows.
The next very large section is that of Hotels & Casinos which lists most all the properties in town with detailed information regardless if the use trunking or not. Motorola and LTR systems do show many talkgroups. Numerous changes are noted since the last issue.
Selected business frequencies follow for a wide variety of operations. A very detailed list (updated) of ham radio frequencies with tones are presented next. Last but not least is a listing of LV area TV audio freqs. in case you want to listen but don't have a TV at your disposal. Some scanners do pick up TV audio.

I am very happy with what I see and it is a good way of keeping current with what is going on in the "radio world" of Las Vegas. The update sheets that come out periodically do help keep the book up to date but I really would like to see a site on the web for this with password access required so that only purchasers of the book would have access as Scannerstuff does with its Arizona publication. It is nice to have an accurate book to hold in my hands especially if I am no where near a computer with internet access. Once again, I would recommend this publication to anyone who wants to seriously monitor the radio activities of Southern Nevada be they a resident or a visitor. Now that I am tired of typing it's time to do a few other things. Happy listening.
 

dtscho

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Excellent review as always. Would you mind if I ask a couple of questions?

1. Does the book continue to leave out the CTCSS/DCS tones for public safety, as they have in previous versions?

2. Would you say the talkgroup information for the Motorola and LTR systems used by the casinos is as good as what's at RadioReference? Just looking for a comparison...

Thanks in advance.

Dave
 

TOUGHLIFE

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I suspect that tones are left out for the most part along with input freqs. to make it more difficult for someone to jam a public safety conventional repeater. It does give some tones for public safety repeaters where it is known that interference in certain parts of town can cause it to be problematic to monitor. I agree with their decision (see pg 2 of their book) in this regards although some scanners do a very good job in searching out tones.
As for talkgroups on the hotel & casino trunking systems I would call them close to RR but I think the book covers the more interesting talkgroups (security, engineering), of a system to a greater extent rather than the less interesting ones (housekeeping, etc. ). Personally, I rarely monitor the hotels and casinos unless there is something of special interest going on and I suspect many others share this habit. There is so much else going on outside of the hotels that is of greater interest.
 

AZMONITOR

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Sounds good. I have ordered a copy today to add to my bookshelf. Website updates would be good.
 

TOUGHLIFE

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As a followup to a question by Dtscho. I also noticed that the book lists some large properties with trunking radio systems, correctly named and with some talkgroups, that are either mis-named by the RR d/b or do not show any talkgroups in the d/b. Also listing the Station Casinos under one name in the d/b does the monitor listener not much good. The book shows each individual property with the data one wants. The book seems to do a good job at keeping up with property name changes. Other differences may exist. Another reason why I like a locally produced publication, it tends to be more complete and accurate. So I suspect that the book is actually better than the RR d/b overall.
 
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