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Food Rationing Confronts Breadbasket of the World (The USA)

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mikepdx

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Food Rationing Confronts Breadbasket of the World

Major retailers in New York, in areas of New England, and on the West Coast are limiting purchases of flour, rice, and cooking oil as demand outstrips supply. There are also anecdotal reports that some consumers are hoarding grain stocks.

Spiking food prices have led to riots in recent weeks in Haiti, Indonesia, and several African nations. India recently banned export of all but the highest quality rice, and Vietnam blocked the signing of a new contract for foreign rice sales.

“I’m surprised the Bush administration hasn’t slapped export controls on wheat,”
(A blogger) said. “The Asian countries are here buying every kind of wheat.”

http://nysun.com/news/food-rationing-confronts-breadbasket-world

This article would be well worth reading in it's entirety.
-mikepdx
 

Zaratsu

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mikepdx said:
Food Rationing Confronts Breadbasket of the World

Major retailers in New York, in areas of New England, and on the West Coast are limiting purchases of flour, rice, and cooking oil as demand outstrips supply. There are also anecdotal reports that some consumers are hoarding grain stocks.

Spiking food prices have led to riots in recent weeks in Haiti, Indonesia, and several African nations. India recently banned export of all but the highest quality rice, and Vietnam blocked the signing of a new contract for foreign rice sales.

“I’m surprised the Bush administration hasn’t slapped export controls on wheat,”
(A blogger) said. “The Asian countries are here buying every kind of wheat.”

http://nysun.com/news/food-rationing-confronts-breadbasket-world

This article would be well worth reading in it's entirety.
-mikepdx

Have you heard Bush's and Mcain's speeches this week on not being "protectionist" and the benefits of globalism?

I kid you not, Bush sounded like he read a magazine article about nothing he knew about on the john in the a.m. and then had to deliver a speech on it, and Mcain did the same thing but right to the face of laid-off factory workers in a workingclass town in mid-america. They are either stupid, in denial, or pushing as hard as they can to cause a collpase. NO rational man could let this happen.


something is WRONG people!:mad:


you hear that sucking sound? its not just jobs this time:roll:
 

mikepdx

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DanTSX said:
They are either stupid, in denial, or pushing as hard as they can to cause a collpase. NO rational man could let this happen.

something is WRONG people!
Outgoing Bush & cronies leave country near collapse.
Democratic President for 2008 a given, but he/she and the majority Democratic Congress can't possibly fix it.
Republicans promise all will be well if you return them to the Presidency AND as a majority to the House in future elections.
Neo-cons return with unbridled power.

Create problem.
Convince the public that you're the only one(s) that can fix it.
Successful many times throughout history.

I'm not sure if I believe it or not in this case.
Yet.
I'm just tossin' it out there for thought...
 
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RC54730

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DanTSX said:
Have you heard Bush's and Mcain's speeches this week on not being "protectionist" and the benefits of globalism?

I kid you not, Bush sounded like he read a magazine article about nothing he knew about on the john in the a.m. and then had to deliver a speech on it, and Mcain did the same thing but right to the face of laid-off factory workers in a workingclass town in mid-america. They are either stupid, in denial, or pushing as hard as they can to cause a collpase. NO rational man could let this happen.
Well, laid-off factory workers pretty much deserve it. The days of just being entitled to a pension/retirement, etc. are long gone, and anyone that doesn't reposition themselves in light of it deserves what they get. I've sent a ton of work to India over the years, and, if I was still managing someone else's money / projects, would do it without blinking an eye.

There is a huge difference in employing people who know that if they don't do their best they are going to starve to death vs the bumpkins at the local mill who just think they should be able to waddle in and out of the plant everyday, no matter how the world is changing. You can hire a bright guy in India, with a degree from a top university for around $10-$20K these days, vs Billy-Bob-Joe-Union who thinks he ought to get $100K for scratching some carton numbers on a clipboard or throwing some sheet metal around.

The world is changing fast - you either keep up, or get left behind. No amount of protectionism is going to save anyone. It's not that I want to be nasty to people, it's just that it's a basic fact of life in this world - you either change with the times, or you get thrown in the dumpster; there are a million motivated people just waiting to take what you have.
 

Zaratsu

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RC54730 said:
Well, laid-off factory workers pretty much deserve it. The days of just being entitled to a pension/retirement, etc. are long gone, and anyone that doesn't reposition themselves in light of it deserves what they get. I've sent a ton of work to India over the years, and, if I was still managing someone else's money / projects, would do it without blinking an eye.

There is a huge difference in employing people who know that if they don't do their best they are going to starve to death vs the bumpkins at the local mill who just think they should be able to waddle in and out of the plant everyday, no matter how the world is changing. You can hire a bright guy in India, with a degree from a top university for around $10-$20K these days, vs Billy-Bob-Joe-Union who thinks he ought to get $100K for scratching some carton numbers on a clipboard or throwing some sheet metal around.

The world is changing fast - you either keep up, or get left behind. No amount of protectionism is going to save anyone. It's not that I want to be nasty to people, it's just that it's a basic fact of life in this world - you either change with the times, or you get thrown in the dumpster; there are a million motivated people just waiting to take what you have.

You read my post so you know that I am fairly well educated on these subjects. I'll agree with you that the world is changing fast and a little ambition outlasts entitlement in any free market. However, you are overlooking two major factors that have long-term implications to our national well-being.

1. You are undervaluing American industry to the point of insult. Their collective knowledge and experience is something that the factories in Shenzhen have tried to "copy" and failed miserably at. Were not talking beer bottle factories here, but skilled factory labor. Automation eliminated the "insert tab A into slot B for 8 hours a day" crowed in the 60s.

2. Billy-Bob-Joe-Union is voting any paying lots of taxes. Ramjit from Keralla is not.


Why shouldnt they get their pension? It is money created by their contribution to the companies success. And it means they are not relying on the government in their old age. This is like saying that CEOs shouldnt be able to make ungodly amounts of money. Now thats not a very capitalist statement now is it?

And back to the factories. What are we going to do when we no longer have a domestic capcity to build certain things that we indivdually need or the govt needs? Look at many of the formerlly "great" european nations. Britain cannot even build their own aircraft carriers anymore because the let the industry die out or move away.

Your taking a text-book view here, but it totally avoids the real needs of Americans. Your model assumes full employment (if everyone is working, then whats the harm in hiring Ramjit from Keralla?) and a predictable economy. (when you wake up one morning and Bear Sterns is worth $10 a share, we cannot even "assume" predictability in the long-term).

We are a world player, but our soveriegnty is one of the ignored checks and balances in the protection of our economic system or rather allows us to play the ecnomy on our own terms. A vital interest to any globalist. The illusion that the entire world is for sale is just that, an illusion. The global expansions of the past 20 years was exciting, but the honeymoon is over and we are moving into a new paradigm, which will be defined by working through the current and future economic resource struggles. Your theory was outdated the second we realized that China has one of our two testes. The world is indeed changing fast, but as always it is cyclical and history repeats itself. So watch out for that invisible hand, it may smack you in the back of the head one day.

Now, find anyone else that could take my side without dragging NAFTA or the NA trade union into the argument.:twisted:
 
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XTS3000

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Anyone else notice almost everything at the grocery store costs more now? It's gone up 15-20% in my area in the past 6 months.

Why is milk so expensive? Supply and demand. Foreign countries are buying our milk produced in the good ol USA, which in turns drives the price up for us.

Might pay to start farming again.
 

Zaratsu

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XTS3000 said:
Anyone else notice almost everything at the grocery store costs more now? It's gone up 15-20% in my area in the past 6 months.

Why is milk so expensive? Supply and demand. Foreign countries are buying our milk produced in the good ol USA, which in turns drives the price up for us.

Might pay to start farming again.
more likely it is our much delayed inflation. We are so scared of it. Why? I dont know. Inflation Happens:lol:

happend before, will happen again. You have a 2-3 year gap where your salary to expense ratio gets a little ugly, but then you start making more money as COLAs take effect.

Remember when Pepsi used to be only 10 cents?:roll:
Remember when the average salary was $8000 a year?

proportionally it is still the same.
 

RC54730

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DanTSX said:
You read my post so you know that I am fairly well educated on these subjects. I'll agree with you that the world is changing fast and a little ambition outlasts entitlement in any free market. However, you are overlooking two major factors that have long-term implications to our national well-being.
Ok...

1. You are undervaluing American industry to the point of insult. Their collective knowledge and experience is something that the factories in Shenzhen have tried to "copy" and failed miserably at. Were not talking beer bottle factories here, but skilled factory labor. Automation eliminated the "insert tab A into slot B for 8 hours a day" crowed in the 60s.
Well, no offense, but I've about had my fill of American industry. I'll stick with my japanese cars, and appliances, that still run strong after N years, over any of the american garbage that I've thrown away over the course of my lifetime. Chinese stuff certainly blows in a lot of ways these days - takes me back to my experiences with american products, but hey, it's kind of nostalgic sometimes.

American industry is, or had a chance to be, mostly technical - science, engineering, but that is rapidly deteriorating in the face of the entitlement crowd.

2. Billy-Bob-Joe-Union is voting any paying lots of taxes. Ramjit from Keralla is not.
Actually, many of these employees do pay taxes - the ones that have worked for me have almost always been employees of my parent company, and payed taxes indirectly through the payroll taxes and other taxes levied on the company that was employing them. Sure, the company is paying less for them, but hey - that's a global market for you, you go where the cost of business is low, and the returns are high. You're talking, on average, a 60-80% performance return on an outlay of 50-80% less money. These are huge returns, if you properly manage a project...

Why shouldnt they get their pension? It is money created by their contribution to the companies success. And it means they are not relying on the government in their old age. This is like saying that CEOs shouldnt be able to make ungodly amounts of money. Now thats not a very capitalist statement now is it?
The difference is that anyone, and I mean anyone, can make enormous amounts of money. It's a simple matter of motivation, risk-taking, and talent. A lot of people seem to think that CEOs are paid excessive amounts of money, just don't realize how hard it is to find good talent - it's not easy to lead enormous companies. The most people I've ever managed in one shot is just around 100, and that was a tremendously difficult job. If you've been in roles where you reported to a CEO, you understand how extremely complicated and difficult that role is - even when you have a large team of talented direct reports acting as GMs, etc. it's still an insanely difficult job.

I'm not saying that people don't *deserve* a pension, I'm just saying that the realities of the workplace today are pretty much going to prevent that from happening...

And back to the factories. What are we going to do when we no longer have a domestic capcity to build certain things that we indivdually need or the govt needs? Look at many of the formerlly "great" european nations. Britain cannot even build their own aircraft carriers anymore because the let the industry die out or move away.
You don't need a domestic manufacturing capability to do great things. That work can (as it already does) go to developing countries, while we focus on the technological innovation that gets us to the next level. Almost all electronics are developed overseas. You would have to be insane, or Solectron (Ah ha ha), to try and succeed doing it here.
Your taking a text-book view here, but it totally avoids the real needs of Americans. Your model assumes full employment (if everyone is working, then whats the harm in hiring Ramjit from Keralla?) and a predictable economy. (when you wake up one morning and Bear Sterns is worth $10 a share, we cannot even "assume" predictability in the long-term).
I'm not taking a text-book view here at all; anything I have to say about this comes directly from real-world experience managing large projects for previous employers. I don't assume full employment at all, in that I'm fully aware that offshoring work eliminates work that could be done here. I just have no problem with it, because in order to stay competitive, you have to find the most cost-effective solution available. The successful model is now to base your global project managers here, and offshore a significant quantity of project work, wherever it makes sense to do so.

In terms of BSC, well, that's just a manifestation of the current entitlement end-game that's being played out in America. Back during the mortgage boom, I knew plenty of traders who actually quit trading and started selling mortgages, because the return that they could get from that was actually higher (and less work) than what they could make trading. If people think it's ok to actually purchase an $800K home when they're only making $80K a year (whether they're lying on their application, or the mortgage broker is looking the other way), well, you reap what you sow. Everyone was a willing participant in the subprime mess, from homeowners on up the chain...

We are a world player, but our soveriegnty is one of the ignored checks and balances in the protection of our economic system or rather allows us to play the ecnomy on our own terms. A vital interest to any globalist. The illusion that the entire world is for sale is just that, an illusion. The global expansions of the past 20 years was exciting, but the honeymoon is over and we are moving into a new paradigm, which will be defined by working through the current and future economic resource struggles. Your theory was outdated the second we realized that China has one of our two testes. The world is indeed changing fast, but as always it is cyclical and history repeats itself. So watch out for that invisible hand, it may smack you in the back of the head one day.
Which theory of mine are you referring to? In terms of global expansion, I just don't think most people realize it hasn't even begun yet. It's not over by any means - things are just warming up. You think India is trouble now, well, give them 100 years and see where things are. The entire tech sector in India, right now, (including "lowly" call-center workers) is about 18-20M people. This is in a country that's composed of about a billion...

I don't travel to India anymore, but one of the things that always stays in my mind is how the streets would change everytime I visited - it's booming over there, and they have hardly started to gain momentum yet. Absolutely cool, but also scary :)
 

rt4768

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Cause of inflation - the FED

DanTSX said:
more likely it is our much delayed inflation. We are so scared of it. Why? I dont know. Inflation Happens:lol:

happend before, will happen again. You have a 2-3 year gap where your salary to expense ratio gets a little ugly, but then you start making more money as COLAs take effect.
Dan,

The real cause of inflation is the Federal Reserve Bank printing money out of thin air. Remember that the Federal Reserve Bank is not part of the US Government, it is a privately held central bank.

Now, if you want to learn more about our monetary system, watch "Money as Debt" on google videos (link below), it's a cartoon, (I know just watch it anyway) about 45 minutes long, and explains the truth about our money.

link: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-9050474362583451279&q=money+from+debt&ei=R6EQSJ7JIY-E4gKqzMGpBA&hl=en
 

Zaratsu

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rt4768 said:
Dan,

The real cause of inflation is the Federal Reserve Bank printing money out of thin air. Remember that the Federal Reserve Bank is not part of the US Government, it is a privately held central bank.

Now, if you want to learn more about our monetary system, watch "Money as Debt" on google videos (link below), it's a cartoon, (I know just watch it anyway) about 45 minutes long, and explains the truth about our money.

link: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-9050474362583451279&q=money+from+debt&ei=R6EQSJ7JIY-E4gKqzMGpBA&hl=en

Heh, I did see that before. I have a pretty good handle on monetary policy. Spent a ton of time reading Mishkin and Friedman. I guess what I am saying is that the real effect of inflation to consumers is much delayed. In terms of how this actually plays out to the consumer on a business cycle level, this is the feeling of "oh shi* things are getting expensive!" Traditional 3% annual inflation is almost imperceptable and the real effect of inflation for the first 3 of the past 5 years has probably been less than 3%. However in the past two years, we have seen some rapid adjustments in several isolated areas of the economy. Items like Milk and even bread haven undergone some quick increases over the 3% nominal inflationary rate. Then commodities increased price, which has the expected results of price increases of consumer goods that we are starting to see right now. I am leaving taxes and housing increases out of the equation due to too many variables and a longer time-fram for adjustment, but the last part to be affected is the real wage. Once the inflationary adjustments work their way through the economy, you will be making proportionally the same ammount as now, but the dollar ammount will be higher with respect to inflation. Once that happens, things "feel" cheeper then before and you feel like their is a higher quality of life (early 90s, & 2002-2005 for example.)

Thats why you always feel like you are playing "catch up":cool:
 
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