GMRS License Renewal

Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
173
Location
Ocala, Florida
#1
Unbelievable what some people will come up with to try and scam others out of money. I received a notice today for a company in California that they will assist me with the task of renewing my FCC GMRS License for the mere price of $165.00

For that price they will mail me FCC form 605 for my signature and when I return it to them, they will forward it to the FCC.

I have to wonder how many people they get to pay them to mail the form in.

end of rant :)
 

krokus

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
3,577
Location
Southeastern Michigan
#2
Unbelievable what some people will come up with to try and scam others out of money. I received a notice today for a company in California that they will assist me with the task of renewing my FCC GMRS License for the mere price of $165.00

For that price they will mail me FCC form 605 for my signature and when I return it to them, they will forward it to the FCC.

I have to wonder how many people they get to pay them to mail the form in.

end of rant :)
My fire department gets similar letters, mailed from a Gettysburg address. I chuckle, and pitch them in the shredder. (Especially since our FCC licenses are free, as a government entity.)

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Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,004
#3
Unbelievable what some people will come up with to try and scam others out of money. I received a notice today for a company in California that they will assist me with the task of renewing my FCC GMRS License for the mere price of $165.00

For that price they will mail me FCC form 605 for my signature and when I return it to them, they will forward it to the FCC.

I have to wonder how many people they get to pay them to mail the form in.

end of rant :)



If you send me your FRN and login credentials, I'll do it for you for $150!

Okay, all kidding aside, I'm guessing that if enough of these letters are sent out, the sender will eventually get some solid "hits". At work, every once in a while we'll get an invoice for non-existent services or products. I think the hope is that the AP department will see the bill and add it to the stack of payables without validating whether the invoice is real or not. What is that saying ascribed to PT Barnum? "There's a sucker born every minute."
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
9,717
Location
WTVLCA01DS0
#4
If you send me your FRN and login credentials, I'll do it for you for $150!

Okay, all kidding aside, I'm guessing that if enough of these letters are sent out, the sender will eventually get some solid "hits". At work, every once in a while we'll get an invoice for non-existent services or products. I think the hope is that the AP department will see the bill and add it to the stack of payables without validating whether the invoice is real or not. What is that saying ascribed to PT Barnum? "There's a sucker born every minute."
Yep.
Obviously they get enough business to make it worth their while.
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2013
Messages
173
Location
Ocala, Florida
#6
I agree with all the comments - it's just sad people try and take advantage of other people like that.

Since moving to Florida, I receive an invoice at least once a month from companies I've never heard of, or have done business with. One even sends past due notices, when i finally called and challenged them, I get some lame brain excuse.

Ok rant over was just sharing.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
Messages
1,004
#7
About 10 or so years ago, the wife and I were in the market for a large SUV (think Ford Expedition). I took to Craigslist and E-Bay as search tools and found a number of unscrupulous posters that had "too good to be true" vehicles for sale. Photos of the cars were clearly professionally taken at exotic locales. The usual premise was that the owner and car were nowhere near the post location and the car was listed at way below market value. The typical ploy was that the owner was desperate to sell it and would be willing to ship the car to "your" location for a nominal fee of just a few thousand dollars. If the card wasn't everything the seller made it out to be and you didn't wish to proceed with the sale, your money would be fully refunded, no questions asked. "How lucky can one get?" you ask.

I had found myself a new hobby. I relentlessly pursued these sellers, using newly formed e-mail addresses. As luck would have it, I always had friends or family in their area (usually military or local PD) who would be willing to bring them the deposit fee if not the asking price and to inspection the goods because , I REALLY wanted that car! I would hound them until eventually, the post for the car would be removed and the sellers account cancelled. I apparently missed my calling as a lucrative online comedian as one of my sons introduced me to the videos of James Veitch, a young man who engages e-mail scammers in a similar fashion. Google him. You man find his videos amusing.

In any case. I hope my "work" prevented at least a few people from being scammed.
 
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