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Grand Hyatt frequencies?

gdaykoloa

Newbie
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 6, 2019
Messages
4
#1
Aloha,

Just bought a brand new SDS100 and am on holiday on Kauai, staying at the Grand Hyatt here — whilst I see some FCC license data for their parent corporation, Kawailoa, I’ve yet to get anything to tune in.

Part of the problem is that the SDS100 is my first scanner since my AOR8000 was brand new and scanning has come a long way in the last decade and a half.

Anyone know of the right way to tune in to the Grand Hyatt Kauai?

Mahalo!

Scott
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Messages
602
Location
Central, NC
#2
Better late than never, but do you know if they actually have radios there? I don't see any licenses for their location.

The closest ones I see are for the nearby golf course (464.800 and 463.215). If they do have radios I would also try the common business frequencies and even the MURS/GMRS frequencies as I sometimes see those used.

The easiest way might just be to use the Close Call feature on your radio while at the hotel.
 

gdaykoloa

Newbie
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 6, 2019
Messages
4
#3
Yep - they do.

But, they are using Motorola XPR 7550 and I think with the AES encryption enabled. Close Call has not quite worked yet, but I may give that a shot.

The Kawailoa frequencies they have in the FCC database are all active, but the SDS100 tends to quickly determine that it is encrypted. Which is good, as I am a fan of encryption generally, but a bit frustrating for personal entertainment purposes...
 
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Messages
602
Location
Central, NC
#4
Based on that radio, I'd say they are using DMR, probably a small CAP+ trunking system. They had those radios at a resort I was at back here in the states and they had a CAP+ system (no encryption here though)
 

hiegtx

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Joined
May 8, 2004
Messages
5,851
Location
Dallas, TX
#5
Yep - they do.

But, they are using Motorola XPR 7550 and I think with the AES encryption enabled. Close Call has not quite worked yet, but I may give that a shot.

The Kawailoa frequencies they have in the FCC database are all active, but the SDS100 tends to quickly determine that it is encrypted. Which is good, as I am a fan of encryption generally, but a bit frustrating for personal entertainment purposes...
Look at this frequency from the database. The emission types on the license indicate DMR.
https://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?fccCallsign=WPOX740

You can program conventionally, set to digital audio, and search, which would get you the color code. Program the frequencies with the class FB2. The frequency 462.7500 is licensed with 10 pagers. The four FB2 frequencies could be conventional, but more likely it's trunked. If programmed conventionally, if you see Cap or Con on the scanner display, that would indicate a trunked system. A simple DMR is likely conventional.

UPMan has said in the past that close call does not work on DMR frequencies, since it is looking for a continuous transmission, whereas DMR switches slots back and forth, and if the other slot is not being used, that dead time between one slots transmission is ignored by the scanner.
 
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