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How do you carry your two way radio on your person?

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Danny37

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#1
So I'm always trying to find that sweet spot to carry my radio on me. I used to put it in back pocket but it got annoying to keep taking it out when I had to sit. When I put it on my belt I'm never comfortable with the radio poking at me. Right now, my sweet spot seems to be to have the radio clipped to my front pocket off to the right side. It doesn't really get in the way and I can move around freely without worrying that I'll snap the antenna off or smash it against something.

What's your desired way of carrying your portable radio?

I forgot to mention the radio I use is a Motorola xts5000. Kinda bulky and heavy but I love it.
 
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#2
How Do You Carry Your Two Way Radio On Your Person?

For me, it depends on what I am doing. I retired from cop work, but when I was still doing it, if I was in uniform, it was on the left side of my gunbelt, opposite of my Glock. In civilian clothes, it generally was carried for a short period of time, like on a warrant. Then, it was center of back, out of the way.

If I am in a vehicle, and there is no mobile radio, it is generally in the cup holder. That way I can hear it better and grab it quickly, when needed.

I do have a Conterra chest harness. Although I haven't used it just lately, for some activities, that is a great choice. Say, for example, if I were out riding one of my horses, the Conterra chest pack would be the preferred method.
 
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#4
So I'm always trying to find that sweet spot to carry my radio on me. I used to put it in back pocket but it got annoying to keep taking it out when I had to sit. When I put it on my belt I'm never comfortable with the radio poking at me. Right now, my sweet spot seems to be to have the radio clipped to my front pocket off to the right side. It doesn't really get in the way and I can move around freely without worrying that I'll snap the antenna off or smash it against something.

What's your desired way of carrying your portable radio?

I forgot to mention the radio I use is a Motorola xts5000. Kinda bulky and heavy but I love it.
I carry mine the same way: clipped to my right pocket. However, one of my sons bought me a case (combination of leather and spandex) with an enclosed belt loop that I periodically use when engaged in more rigorous activity that might cause my HT to fall out of my pocket.
 
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#5
How Do You Carry Your Two Way Radio On Your Person?

I haven't researched it just lately, but there are a few different chest pack pouches available from various places. Motorola is one of them, but, as many people here already know, with Motorola "you never get better AND you never pay more"!

When I worked off duty at a ski resort, I recall that the National Ski Patrol there used chest packs. It makes sense because you have the radio closer to your head and ears and can adjust volume or channels easily. It isn't necessarily "pretty" but it is functional.

I also recall that the railroad industry may use chest packs, too.

I am sure the other likely discussion is why a chest pack vs. a radio on the belt with a remote speaker microphone. I think the answer is that it simply gives you another choice. Not to mention that a radio, on the belt, can attenuate a lot of signal. Many have known, over the years, that bringing the radio off the belt and near you head can improve reception in marginal areas.
 

ladn

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#6
I usually like to carry my Yaesu using a twist off belt clip on my left side (it interferes less with the seat belt in the car). If I'm using the radio a lot, I'll use an external mic clipped either to my collar or picket. This works especially well if I'm carrying the radio under a jacket or duster.
 
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#7
I haven't researched it just lately, but there are a few different chest pack pouches available from various places. Motorola is one of them, but, as many people here already know, with Motorola "you never get better AND you never pay more"!

When I worked off duty at a ski resort, I recall that the National Ski Patrol there used chest packs. It makes sense because you have the radio closer to your head and ears and can adjust volume or channels easily. It isn't necessarily "pretty" but it is functional.

I also recall that the railroad industry may use chest packs, too.

I am sure the other likely discussion is why a chest pack vs. a radio on the belt with a remote speaker microphone. I think the answer is that it simply gives you another choice. Not to mention that a radio, on the belt, can attenuate a lot of signal. Many have known, over the years, that bringing the radio off the belt and near you head can improve reception in marginal areas.
I think it's more function than anything. With ski-gear, belt clips aren't practical because the radio either has to go under the parka or awkwardly over it and they aren't comfortable to fall on. A chest rig is generally the least likely to be fallen on (unless doing a superman impression) especially since many skiers simply layover on their sides when they feel the need to get closer to the ground.

I know when I go skiing I typically use my radio on my backpack and run a RSM along the strap...
 
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#8
I haven't researched it just lately, but there are a few different chest pack pouches available from various places. Motorola is one of them, but, as many people here already know, with Motorola "you never get better AND you never pay more"!

When I worked off duty at a ski resort, I recall that the National Ski Patrol there used chest packs. It makes sense because you have the radio closer to your head and ears and can adjust volume or channels easily. It isn't necessarily "pretty" but it is functional.

I also recall that the railroad industry may use chest packs, too.

I am sure the other likely discussion is why a chest pack vs. a radio on the belt with a remote speaker microphone. I think the answer is that it simply gives you another choice. Not to mention that a radio, on the belt, can attenuate a lot of signal. Many have known, over the years, that bringing the radio off the belt and near you head can improve reception in marginal areas.
When I was younger, chest packs from an outfit in Kelowna, BC we very popular at the ski resorts in the interior of BC, by both the resort staff(Ski Patrol and Operations staff) and the ski racing clubs. Unlike the Motorola chest pack, these held the radio at an angle. When adjusted properly you could wear them all day long.

I found mine when my folks sent me a bunch of boxes of my stuff a few years ago. These packs were really comfortable to use, even with a P200/HT600 sized radio. The down side is that small modern radios do not fit in it very well.

There is one company out of the US that markets a chest pack to wild-land fire fighters/ICS staff that can hold 2 portables at the same time.
 
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#9
I think it's more function than anything. With ski-gear, belt clips aren't practical because the radio either has to go under the parka or awkwardly over it and they aren't comfortable to fall on. A chest rig is generally the least likely to be fallen on (unless doing a superman impression) especially since many skiers simply layover on their sides when they feel the need to get closer to the ground.

I know when I go skiing I typically use my radio on my backpack and run a RSM along the strap...
Bingo. This is precisely why chest packs are popular in the ski industry. Even using a chest pack, I almost always used a RSM to keep the radio somewhat warm under my jacket.
 
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#10
My Methods

In my cup holder, on my belt and in my hand as well

When I'm in a crowded area such as a mall (almost daily) I carry one of my handhelds in my tee shirt pocket
I can hear it at a low volume (don't like earphones although I have a few)
I keep it concealed or "undercover" if you will by wearing a shirt or light jacket open in the front.
That works well for me
 

jwt873

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#11
In cooler weather when I'm wearing a jacket I keep my radio on an inside jacket pocket.

When I'm not wearing a jacket, I clip my HT on my left front pants pocket. My right pocket usually has change, keys etc and without the radio there's It's easier to get at them.
 

Danny37

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#13
I forgot to mention this is during my off duty hours, we use leather shoulder straps on duty and I think they've been the most comfortable so far. I haven't tried a chest harness yet, I don't think I ever saw an EMT wear one so I think I would get odd looks haha. I've seen police officers wear them though, rarely but I have seen them.
 

wa8pyr

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#14
So I'm always trying to find that sweet spot to carry my radio on me. I used to put it in back pocket but it got annoying to keep taking it out when I had to sit. When I put it on my belt I'm never comfortable with the radio poking at me. Right now, my sweet spot seems to be to have the radio clipped to my front pocket off to the right side. It doesn't really get in the way and I can move around freely without worrying that I'll snap the antenna off or smash it against something.

What's your desired way of carrying your portable radio?

I forgot to mention the radio I use is a Motorola xts5000. Kinda bulky and heavy but I love it.
Depends on what I'm doing. Like you I use an XTS5k (and an Astro Saber when the mood strikes me), and when I'm out and about on a normal day I generally just clip it to my front pocket with the belt clip. If I'm out and about doing something which requires the radio not get in the way so much, I'll use a holster with Milwaukee strap over my shoulder, and the speaker mike clipped to the loop on the strap.

If I'm working such that I have to keep both hands free all the time and will be bending over a lot to climb up or down, I have a chest pack which has been pretty handy on occasion.

By the way, I've always known the holster strap as a Milwaukee strap, but others may know it by other names (I've heard people from a certain eastern seaboard city which shall remain nameless call it a New York Strap :D).
 

Danny37

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#15
By the way, I've always known the holster strap as a Milwaukee strap, but others may know it by other names (I've heard people from a certain eastern seaboard city which shall remain nameless call it a New York Strap :D).
Really? Lived in NY my whole life and I've always heard it refered to as a radio strap or a Boston strap.

Also an Astro saber must really make you feel like your pants are going to drop, I had an saber 2 awhile with a short many years ago because of its slim design it was the only radio that felt comfortable having in the back pocket. Ofcourse it stuck out because of its size but it just felt right, that's all I can say haha.
 
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#16
Really? Lived in NY my whole life and I've always heard it refered to as a radio strap or a Boston strap.

Also an Astro saber must really make you feel like your pants are going to drop, I had an saber 2 awhile with a short many years ago because of its slim design it was the only radio that felt comfortable having in the back pocket. Ofcourse it stuck out because of its size but it just felt right, that's all I can say haha.
Eh, put a modern Li-ion battery on one and I'd rather carry one in my back pocket versus the clip.
 
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#17
Depends on the application. When I was active in the fire service I always carried mine in a man purse. AKA New York strap with a stabilizer strap to keep it from swinging forward on me, and RSM clipped to the loop on the strap.
 

ScanWI

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#18
Depends on the radio I am carrying. Usually I am using a radio strap while carrying my larger radios. Or on the belt for the small ones


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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#20
How Do You Carry Your Two Way Radio On Your Person?

I carry a 357 magnum on my right side so the radio has to go on my left side via belt swivel
Holy crap. A revolver. Really? Do you still listen to 8 track tapes and use a rotary dial telephone, too?

(I kid, I kid...hopefully no offense is taken.)
 
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