• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

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kpg-128d

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#1
does someone know how to use kpg-128d software?
what is QT/DQT DEC AND ENC.
I PROGRAMMED MY TK-2360 FIRE FREQUENCY RX 154.4300 AND TX 154.4300
IS THIS RIGHT? I WANT IT TO HIT THE REPEATERS TOO.
 
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#2
does someone know how to use kpg-128d software?
what is QT/DQT DEC AND ENC.
QT = Quite Tone. It's Kenwood's name for CTCSS (Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System). Other manufacturers use the term PL = Private Line, CTCSS, etc.

DQT = Digital Quite Tone. Kenwood's name for DCS (DIgital Coded Squelch System). Other manufacturers use the term DPL, digital squelch, etc.

DEC = Decode. This is where the radio will listen for the programmed QT -or- DQT before opening the squelch. If the programmed QT or DQT isn't there, you won't hear the radio traffic.

ENC = Encode. This is where the radio will transmit the QT or DQT along with your voice. This can be for triggering repeater, opening the squelch on other receivers, etc.

These MUST be programmed correctly for your radio to TRANSMIT through a repeater. If it is not programmed correctly, your transmission won't trigger the repeater.




I PROGRAMMED MY TK-2360 FIRE FREQUENCY RX 154.4300 AND TX 154.4300
IS THIS RIGHT? I WANT IT TO HIT THE REPEATERS TOO.
Not programmed like that, it won't. A repeater uses two frequencies. There is an input frequency and an output frequency. This is necessary so the repeater isn't trying to transmit on the same frequency it is listening on. You are missing one of the frequencies.

To get this frequency, here's what you need to do:

Since the FCC license holder is responsible for each and _EVERY_ radio that is on their system, they are the ones that can grant access. You need to find out who this person is and get the correct information from them to program your radio. You also need to have something in writing from the license holder giving you permission to use your own private radio on their system.
Simply working for the agency isn't sufficient.
Yes, they can bust you if you do this without their permission. I've done it to people that added radios to my work systems without our permission.
Also, some radio systems use a PTT ID number for each individual radio. You need to find out if your agency uses that and get an ID assigned to your radio.

Once you have all that, you can program up your radio.

From the license holder you will need (in addition to written permission) the following:
1. Transmit Frequency for the repeater. This gets programed into the receive frequency on your radio.
2. Transmit QT/DQT or PL/DPL or CTCSS/DCS for the repeater. This gets programmed into the receive frequency DEC QT/DQT on your radio.

3. Receive frequency for the repeater. This gets programmed into the transmit frequency on your radio.
4. Permitted transmit power on for hand held radios on the license. Don't automatically assume it's just "full power". It may not be. Exceeding the transmitter power or ERP listed on the FCC license can get you and the license holder in trouble.
5. Receive QT/DQT or PL/DPL or CTCSS/DCS for the repeater. This gets programmed into the transmit frequency ENC QT/DQT on your radio.

6. If they use a radio ID, you'll need to figure out what they use, there could be a couple of different options and they are not compatible. FleetSync, MDC-1200, etc. are all some options. Your radio may not support MDC-1200, though. You'll need a radio ID assigned to your radio if they do use these.
 

w1bp

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#4
It looks like you're trying to program the Howland Twp Fire, 154.43 Search Results.

I'd suggest talking to the fire department's communications person. You'll get the authorization you need to transmit on that frequency, and you'll also likely get details and help programming your radio.
 
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#9
I PROGRAMMED MY TK-2360 FIRE FREQUENCY RX 154.4300 AND TX 154.4300
IS THIS RIGHT? or is there a tx freq.
What you programmed was a simplex channel. If your agency has a repeater, then the TX and RX frequencies will be different.

As it's programmed right now, it's not going to work with a repeater. Only simple - radio to radio.
 
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#11
Rather than look for a site for this information, you should heed the excellent advice W1bp has offered.

Rather than ask for information about your radio system, that is your life line for you and your brothers and sisters, on a hobbiest scanner site, you really should talk to whom ever is responsible for your deparments communications. Not only will they ensure it is programmed properly, and have all the frequencies you may need, they will also know whom you need to talk to to get approval for your personal radio to be used on their radio system.
 
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#12
is there web site that I can find this info?
If you had the FCC call sign, you could look it up on the FCC license search. But all that is going to give you is the transmit and receive frequencies. QT/DQT tones are not listed on the FCC license.

You could search the radioreference.com database, but that information comes from the FCC database. Things like the QT/DQT (will be listed under the "TONE" column) rely on local scanner listeners providing that information. There is no guarantee of accuracy.

However, I need to point out the obvious:
If you have been authorized to use the channel by your chief, they he/she will be able to provide that information to you directly. Programming a radio up without permission from the license holder can be a career shortening event. You'd be much better off just asking directly. Worse they can say is "no". Not asking permission and doing it anyway can lead to things a lot worse than "no".
 
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#13
So, I did an FCC search for 154.430 in your county in Ohio.

Rittman Fire Department:

City of Rittman
Andy Baillis
25 N. State St.
Rittman, OH 44270
(330)925-2065
E mail: abaillis (at) rittman (dot) com

That's the licensee. Talking to them would be a really good idea. You'd need permission from the licensee to put your radio on their system anyway. They could also provide you with the correct programming information.

Also, it's very likely they've got the repeated channel as well as a "fire ground" channel. Likely other local agencies are programmed in for mutual aid. Making sure your radio is programmed correctly should be of upmost importance to a fire fighter. Not having the channels you need in an emergency can be a real issue.
 
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#14
i have been the fire service for 22 years for the city of Rittman. I have already asked for the info. if any new radios are bought. they are bought from out of state dealer and the city can only afford 10 radios per 5 years. so a lot of us are buying used radios from other departments or people who have retired. I picked up on a good deal for these radios. I got 8 radios with chargers from a person who is not in the fire service no more for 100.00. I will take one and give the rest to others who need one. that is why I am looking to learn to program or find someone close to me to have them programmed.
 

cmjonesinc

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#15
If you don't know the input and output frequencies and you're relying on a hobbyist website for the info than you have no business programming the radios. Wanting to learn is one thing but wanting to program 8 radios to distribute among personnel is another. Don't get me wrong, wanting to do it and help out and provide radios to people who wouldn't have them otherwise is a great thing to do. But passing out radios that may not be programmed correctly is asking for trouble. Just think if you passed out 8 radios and had a fire with 4 in and 4 out who couldn't talk to each other. I would find the tech officer for the station or county and ask them for the info and training to program the radios correctly. Side note, as those are used radios I would have them bench tested by a qualified tech before being put into service. Just because it appears to transmit and receive okay doesn't mean that it is. I would hate to have my life and the lives of others relying on used untested improperly programmed radios.
 
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#16
I agree.

What you are doing is noble. I understand the struggle. It shouldn't be this way, but it is.

I'll concur with CMJonesInc. The questions you are asking suggest a lack of understanding on how repeaters work. This isn't a Kenwood versus Motorola thing, it's understanding how radios work.

If firefighters are putting their lives on the line with these radios, then it's 100% required that everything is accurate. Guessing, using a hobbyist website, or expecting someone else to try and guess what you are doing isn't taking the proper steps to ensure these radios are going to be set up correctly.

Many of us here work in the radio industry and would be more than happy to help you out. I have personally programmed radios for volunteer firefighters for free, just because I understand the struggle. This isn't about any of us trying to keep you from doing this. This is about guys who know exactly what we are doing and understand the risks of doing it incorrectly trying to make sure you do it correctly.

Not having the correct information necessary to program the radios is a show stopper. This information should be easy to get. I provided contact info above for the FCC license contact person. A call to him should get you all the information you need to do this correctly and without any guessing. At some point someone had the information necessary to program the radios. Finding out who has that is step #1.

Really, we are trying to help you out here, but this isn't something where a person on the other side of the country can make a guess and get them working for you.
 

buddrousa

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#17
How do you know if you program your radio that it does not have problems because it was not checked with a service monitor. You may be interfering with someone else.
 

buddrousa

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#20
Do you have a $20,000 service monitor to test each radio. You also know that by you programming these radios if 1 fails and you have a Line of Duty Death or Injury you are going to be liable and could be held accountable in court. This is why radio shops have Liability Insurance to cover the shop and techs. You could be ask in court where you got your Electronics Degree and Training in Two Way Radio Systems.
 
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