• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Medical Examiner?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Quickcall

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2005
Messages
301
Location
Central New York
#1
I saw a state medical examiners vehicle in the Boston/Longwood area today and it got me wondering... what frequency or system does the State Medical Examiner use for dispatch and operations?
 

Quickcall

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2005
Messages
301
Location
Central New York
#3
Joined
Jul 8, 2002
Messages
10,250
Location
Taxachusetts
#4
Altho the CME has had radio licenses over the years, including (reports) of a TG on the MDC now MSP Trunked System, they have barely been heard. All of my experience has been, they are dispatched by Pager/Phone.

Could be the VHF is part of the MEMA network, as MEMA provides services for many other agencies, but CME is not listed

Communications | MEMA

That didn't really tell me much about the original question. I should also add the vehicle had a a Motorola XTL2500 mounted on in the front so they must be able to communicate with someone. The only antenna I saw looked to be a VHF mounted on the front. I couldn't see the top to tell if there were others.
 

garys

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 13, 2002
Messages
4,556
Location
Eastern MA
#5
I had a lot of contact with the OCME over the years, even before they were called the OCME. ;) I don't recall them ever using radios or seeing their employees carrying portable radios. To the best of my knowledge they are dispatched by cell phone, not radio.

Since they don't "patrol" between calls and generally have to return to Albany Street with remains, it makes sense that they don't use a radio system.

All non attended deaths (generally out of hospital deaths) require a call to the office. Information is given to the person who answers the call. After that, the office will call back and state whether the office will accept or decline jurisdiction for the case. If they accept, they will send out a van or occasionally they will allow a funeral home to pick up the deceased. If they decline, the family or whoever is authorized to contact a funeral home and arrange for pick up.
 

Quickcall

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 23, 2005
Messages
301
Location
Central New York
#6
I had a lot of contact with the OCME over the years, even before they were called the OCME. ;) I don't recall them ever using radios or seeing their employees carrying portable radios. To the best of my knowledge they are dispatched by cell phone, not radio.

Since they don't "patrol" between calls and generally have to return to Albany Street with remains, it makes sense that they don't use a radio system.

All non attended deaths (generally out of hospital deaths) require a call to the office. Information is given to the person who answers the call. After that, the office will call back and state whether the office will accept or decline jurisdiction for the case. If they accept, they will send out a van or occasionally they will allow a funeral home to pick up the deceased. If they decline, the family or whoever is authorized to contact a funeral home and arrange for pick up.
Cool beans man. I suppose the radios could be there for field preparedness of large scale events and just don't get used for day to day operations. Thanks!
 
Joined
Jul 25, 2004
Messages
3,669
#7
I was friends with our local ME and asked about this very topic. He indicated that he was dispatched in one of two ways, phone and pager. That provided him with the necessary information (address and specific details of the incident) and he drove the van to the location without the public being made aware of any information about the call.

The ME van did have a radio (actually a couple of radios), but it was only used to coordinate his arrival with and departure from the scene with the on scene commander or officers in charge. Basically it was to allow his van to be as close as possible to the body without impacting any crime scene or other evidence and to allow those on scene to know when he had arrived so they could provide him the access he needed. There were frequencies for the local PD and FD for the various towns in the county as well as the county sheriff, state police, and the county fire district frequencies. Since the ME was a county wide office he had to communicate with agencies in each town, city, in the county as well as the agencies that handled issues outside of their jurisdictions.
 

rknight

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
7
#8
Mass ME

Spoke to a person from the ME's office and they tell me all call are sent via phone. They do have radios in the vehicle that are vhf and can communicate with MEMA is neccessary.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top