• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

meriden police went digital

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bluefox2163

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meriden police went digital on friday they are on 852.4625 but i dont know what they are using for an f2?
 

danivers

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Looking for listeners

I'm looking for scanner listeners in the Meriden area for a Record-Journal story on the PD's plan to encrypt their signal.

Wouldn't have to comment directly on the PD - more just why you listen, what you get out of it, etc...

Please contact me at (203) 317-2275 or divers@record-journal.com ASAP if you're willing. Trying to keep this issue alive before the scanners go blank!

Dan Ivers
Record-Journal
 

tmik

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Radio scanners silent as police go digital, plan encryption

Radio scanners silent as police go digital, plan encryption

By Dan Ivers, Record-Journal staff | Posted: Friday, September 2, 2011 10:47 pm

MERIDEN - Like a deadbolt or a faithful guard dog, Wayne Gdovin always viewed his police scanner as a way to keep his family safe.

The crackle of the small, analog, programmable scanner with the chatter of city officers and dispatchers has been a familiar sound at his Johnson Avenue home for the last 25 years. Last week, however, city police switched their signal to digital to comply with federal communications regulations, and the old radio has suddenly gone quiet.

Gdovin, a father of three and grandfather of eight, is considering buying a more expensive digital scanner to continue listening in, but he is also concerned about a plan to encrypt police communications. Once put into place, the new technology would shut out anyone without access to a special code, regardless of their equipment.

"It was just that you got to know what was going on in the city - where there were trouble areas, shootings," he said. "It lets you know what to expect."

The switch to digital radio is not only necessary to stay in line with federal regulations. It's also needed to communicate with police in neighboring towns and connect to a statewide law enforcement frequency. It would also improve problems with dead spots, particularly in low-lying areas.

Encryption, however, is a decision that lies entirely with individual police departments. While most law enforcement agencies in the state have already made the switch to digital radio - which, unlike analog, is compatible with encryption technology - only a handful of departments have opted for full encryption.

The state police, for example, have had a full digital radio system since 2009 but still communicate over open frequencies available to the public. Many of the departments that have switched have faced an outcry from devoted scanner listeners as well as from the news media, which relies on scanner transmissions to dispatch reporters and photographers to emergencies such as car accidents, fires, shootings or other incidents.

Meriden Police Chief Jeffry Cossette has not responded to multiple requests for comment on the reasons behind the plans for encryption. Last week, Lt. Patrick Gaynor told the Record-Journal that the encryption will help keep officers safe by preventing criminals from overhearing their communications.

The switch could also cut down on sensitive information, such as the names of juveniles, and other details that are typically not released to the public, floating over the airwaves, according to Gaynor.

Gdovin said he understands that "bad people" have scanners, too, and that some things should not be broadcast for anyone to hear. But he said police and fire personnel have always been able to use code or switch over to alternate frequencies at their discretion. With an 11-year-old granddaughter now living with him, he's as concerned as ever about crime in his neighborhood and around the city.

"It's just nice (to know what's going on) when you have kids," Gdovin said. "Especially in this day and age, with drugs and everything. To me, it's a good thing to have. I miss it."

Those concerns are shared by many of the city's neighborhood association leaders, who regularly meet with police to discuss problems with crime and other public safety issues.

Council of Neighborhoods President David Swedock said he would like to see a compromise that would allow police to encrypt information that should not be released, but still allow local media and the public to hear most transmissions.

"I think it's important for people to be able to listen. I also think it's important for stuff that's sensitive shouldn't be heard, either," he said.

Talks about the switch had been going on for some time, according to Swedock, who called the publicizing of the move during a federal investigation into allegations of police brutality and other misconduct an "unfortunate coincidence." He added that he believes it will likely be up to a year before full encryption takes effect.

Mary Ellen Mordarski, a member of the Council of Neighborhoods board of directors, also believes the public should be allowed to monitor what police are doing unless it is absolutely necessary to hide it.

"I think we should be able to know what's going on in town. I've always been a big advocate for openness," she said. "Unless it's some secret covert operation, I kind of doubt that things need to be hidden. I'd say 90 percent of what happens in town is public information."

divers@record-journal.com

(203) 317-2275
 

Bob_61

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Enfield,Ct.
Radio scanners silent as police go digital, plan encryption

By Dan Ivers, Record-Journal staff | Posted: Friday, September 2, 2011 10:47 pm

MERIDEN - Like a deadbolt or a faithful guard dog, Wayne Gdovin always viewed his police scanner as a way to keep his family safe.

The crackle of the small, analog, programmable scanner with the chatter of city officers and dispatchers has been a familiar sound at his Johnson Avenue home for the last 25 years. Last week, however, city police switched their signal to digital to comply with federal communications regulations, and the old radio has suddenly gone quiet.

Gdovin, a father of three and grandfather of eight, is considering buying a more expensive digital scanner to continue listening in, but he is also concerned about a plan to encrypt police communications. Once put into place, the new technology would shut out anyone without access to a special code, regardless of their equipment.

"It was just that you got to know what was going on in the city - where there were trouble areas, shootings," he said. "It lets you know what to expect."

The switch to digital radio is not only necessary to stay in line with federal regulations. It's also needed to communicate with police in neighboring towns and connect to a statewide law enforcement frequency. It would also improve problems with dead spots, particularly in low-lying areas.

Encryption, however, is a decision that lies entirely with individual police departments. While most law enforcement agencies in the state have already made the switch to digital radio - which, unlike analog, is compatible with encryption technology - only a handful of departments have opted for full encryption.

The state police, for example, have had a full digital radio system since 2009 but still communicate over open frequencies available to the public. Many of the departments that have switched have faced an outcry from devoted scanner listeners as well as from the news media, which relies on scanner transmissions to dispatch reporters and photographers to emergencies such as car accidents, fires, shootings or other incidents.

Meriden Police Chief Jeffry Cossette has not responded to multiple requests for comment on the reasons behind the plans for encryption. Last week, Lt. Patrick Gaynor told the Record-Journal that the encryption will help keep officers safe by preventing criminals from overhearing their communications.

The switch could also cut down on sensitive information, such as the names of juveniles, and other details that are typically not released to the public, floating over the airwaves, according to Gaynor.

Gdovin said he understands that "bad people" have scanners, too, and that some things should not be broadcast for anyone to hear. But he said police and fire personnel have always been able to use code or switch over to alternate frequencies at their discretion. With an 11-year-old granddaughter now living with him, he's as concerned as ever about crime in his neighborhood and around the city.

"It's just nice (to know what's going on) when you have kids," Gdovin said. "Especially in this day and age, with drugs and everything. To me, it's a good thing to have. I miss it."

Those concerns are shared by many of the city's neighborhood association leaders, who regularly meet with police to discuss problems with crime and other public safety issues.

Council of Neighborhoods President David Swedock said he would like to see a compromise that would allow police to encrypt information that should not be released, but still allow local media and the public to hear most transmissions.

"I think it's important for people to be able to listen. I also think it's important for stuff that's sensitive shouldn't be heard, either," he said.

Talks about the switch had been going on for some time, according to Swedock, who called the publicizing of the move during a federal investigation into allegations of police brutality and other misconduct an "unfortunate coincidence." He added that he believes it will likely be up to a year before full encryption takes effect.

Mary Ellen Mordarski, a member of the Council of Neighborhoods board of directors, also believes the public should be allowed to monitor what police are doing unless it is absolutely necessary to hide it.

"I think we should be able to know what's going on in town. I've always been a big advocate for openness," she said. "Unless it's some secret covert operation, I kind of doubt that things need to be hidden. I'd say 90 percent of what happens in town is public information."

divers@record-journal.com

(203) 317-2275


( Does this Lt. Patrick Gaynor have any clue that scanner listeners have been listening for years and there has been no proof that listening to scanner has increased crime?)

If I hear something on my scanner and see the person they are looking for I would report it.
So where do they get the idea that all scanner listener are involved in crime? If apps are the problem that is where they to look at. Those who use apps on their phone are not in the hobby of using a scanner. With the exception scanner users that still want to listen when they don't have their radios with them. They must not have any clue that we can help! Or should everyone stop calling 911? Since we have no idea what is going on around us? If we don't help the police, there is a good chance that a lot of crimes will not get solved!
 

freightguy

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Meriden gone digital

First off, if MPD is so concerned about Officer safety, then why have all of these neighborhood watches and associations? Because you are about to put them all in the dark by encrypting. Those association members monitor calls especially to their neighborhoods. If the neighborhoods are in the dark, then the officers' safety is jeopardized because you are on your own, without our extra sets of eyes.

Secondly, the $2,000,000 for the new system has been spent for some time now. The equipment has been sitting in a warehouse waiting to be installed and upgrades to the dispatch center to accomodate the new equipment. How did you get an appropriation of this size awarded on a BS reason of Officer Safety?

Thirdly, I have been a scanner buff for over 40 years, since I was in my early teens. In all my years of monitoring, I can't remember the last time that I heard any sensitive information about youthful offenders broadcast in any town, and I monitor several simultaneously, and daily. That is what the officers have email on the laptops in the cruisers in Meriden (that they had to have so badly), and they also have city issued cell phones to use for this sensitive information; so yet another BS reason given.

Fourthly, it is not federally mandated that Meriden go digitally encrypted, It is mandated that Meriden go digital before going encrypted, as opposed to all of the old systems that were analog.

Fifthly, by being the only ones to know what is going on, MPD will put all of it's officers in more danger than ever before, not to mention MPD is skyrocketing the element of mistrust at a time when they are under federal investigation for excessive force, brutality, and assault on the citizens of this community by a handful that place a dark cloud over the entire department, and unduly so. There are many officers on this police force that deserve the recognition and respect of the public for their daily deeds to help and assist the public in a dire time of need.

Why do you need all of this secrecy? What are you going to try to hide from us taxpayers now? Why even have the Citizens Police Academy or the DARE Program?

All you are doing is reversing the progress that you made in the past decade through Community Policing Programs, enlisting the help of neighborhood watches and associations, and the kids in school, by converting the MPD to an army of RoboCops, wearing fatigues, SWAT clothing, and toting more weapons on their belt, and now secrecy is added to the arsenal.

You've gotten your way, now you are on your own. Keep me safe!
 

Tom_G

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Newington, CT
Interesting article, but some things are incorrect...

"The switch to digital radio is not only necessary to stay in line with federal regulations. It's also needed to communicate with police in neighboring towns and connect to a statewide law enforcement frequency"
I am not aware of any Federal Guidelines for digital and as far as neighboring towns go umm not seeing much there either. (maybe Wallingford...)

It would also improve problems with dead spots, particularly in low-lying areas.
Keep dreaming an that one.... LOL

Cha Ching, Cha Ching....
 

millrad

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Perhaps they were sold the typical bill of goods by Motorola, where digital P25 is better than FM, and encryption is better than non-encryption. It all adds up to big bucks for Mother M, and radio-ignorant police chiefs and mayors fall for it hook, line and sinker.
 

APX7500X2

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Meriden is Tait P25 Not motorola.

I think ALL Police should be encrypted 24/7 as we have no real reason to listen to them live.

If you want to police the police you can get the recordings of the last 24 hours or what ever you want with FOI any time you want.

Try telling the FBI/DEA/USSS/ICE and all the others that they have to stop encrypting because we want to listen. See how far you get with that
 

lindsay34654

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All this encryption non encryption police secrecy is a bunch of bull. I can see them going Digital for quality, but encryption is not going to be for officer safety and anyone that thinks that needs to get educated how many crimes have ever been reported that the criminal used some type of scanner. I was at one point a police officer in Boston and not once in 12 yrs has it seen shown that any criminal used a scanner. Encryption is going to hinder not help officer safety. A lot of help that the police get are from citizens that listen to scanners that see something happening in their area and direct police to the offender. How many times has it been report that someone listening to a scanner had aided a police officer that has been hurt till help arrived, answer alot. If you have problems in your department that you do not want the public to hear clean up your mess within.
 

APX7500X2

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All this encryption non encryption police secrecy is a bunch of bull. I can see them going Digital for quality, but encryption is not going to be for officer safety and anyone that thinks that needs to get educated how many crimes have ever been reported that the criminal used some type of scanner. .
The number that the Criminal used some type scanner is in the thousands now due to I phone apps

A recent robbery in southern CT the lookout was in his car listing to his I phone scanner app to track PD

At the local FD the other day the guys were using the scanner apps on their phones to avoid some speed traps; they also said they come in handy for DWI check points.

A local PD that went encrypted not to long ago has found that when someone calls in a drug dealer on the corner he is still there when they get there because his I phone scanner app is not working anymore.

Again no real reason to listen to the Pd except for entertainment or for profit in the case of media
 

freightguy

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Meriden CT 06450
Digital Encryption Meriden PD

A recent robbery in southern CT the lookout was in his car listing to his I phone scanner app to track PD - Were they caught? And how is it known that they used an I-Phone App to track police activity? Use of police signals in the commission of a crime is illegal!

At the local FD the other day the guys were using the scanner apps on their phones to avoid some speed traps; they also said they come in handy for DWI check points. - This very same FD has a RadioReference link on its website to monitor their own calls!!! PS - DWI checkpoints are publicized in the local newspapers prior.

A local PD that went encrypted not to long ago has found that when someone calls in a drug dealer on the corner he is still there when they get there because his I phone scanner app is not working anymore. - It would be better to work with the loacal feed provider(s) rather than spen almost $2m taxpayer dollars in this economy to hide your signals, ESPECIALLY in light of the federal investigations of several officers for excessive brute force, or did you not know that Off Cossette's dash cam and audio of the field incident is available on YouTube. If you are going to cover up the in-house incidents with encryption, you had better get a tight hold on the release of videos.

Again no real reason to listen to the Pd except for entertainment or for profit in the case of media
Or to keep them in check; help them when we can; and protect or neighborhoods and families when possible. But that will all be a thing of the past soon.

Oh, and if it were for clearer reception, you wouldn't be stuck on Channel 2 indefinitely while they sort out the issues on Channel 1!

My opinion is that no PD or FD should be encrypted. That is what you have cell phones for that the taxpayers pay for.

Officer Safety is nothing but smoke, but it got that lame group of City Councilors to again open up the city checkbook and yet purchase another toy for the PD, like the laptops you had to have in every cruiser which are only good for email and reception of RadioReference feeds from your surrounding towns FOR FREE!
 
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millrad

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If you monitor FBI/DEA New Haven channels regularly, you'll hear lots of APCO P25 stuff in the clear including surveillance and the tailing of suspects. Apparently someone occasionally forgets to hit the "encrypt" button.Glad they're using plain of p25 and not some obscure propriatary system.
 

Cskib32087

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for APX7500X2 -

FYI - you don't even need an app to listen. It can be accessed from any device with internet by going to RR Mobile .
I think thats what he was saying, it is so easy to listen now days that every person with a phone or internet can listen.
You just made a great case for encryption. I know a few bridgeport cops and they always had people listening to them with phones and that is an officer safey issue, they are very happy people can't listen to ambush them anymore.

We sit and listen, they go out and dodge bullets, Im happy to give them a little money to keep them safe, in the long run its keeping me safe.

I love to listen to everything 24/7 but i cant give a good reason i need or have to listen.
What we do is a hobby like building model cars, our hobby is slowly going away and people are mad about it, don't get a cop killed because you can't find something else to do!
 

freightguy

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Hobby?

That's okay if its a hobby, but YOUR hobby didn't just cost me a piece of a $2m pie that I had no say in spending.

You can walk away from a hobby, not your tax base!

They have encrypted for all the wrong reasons. They should have cleaned up their act from the inside out, tightened their belts in this economy, and done without the new toys.

They already have cellphones on each officer and laptops in every cruiser (which are not being used for anything but email).

Meriden is quite a costly city to live in.

Then, by encrypting, they will be destroying the relationships with the community watches and programs that have taken over 2 decades of work to empower.
 

PJH

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I thought the basis behind community watch was to WATCH and REPORT.
 

freightguy

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PJH - Don't be nieve! Most neighborhood watches are scanner equipped. In most cases, they are first alerted to troulble in their area by a monitored signal, and THEN they spring into action, alerting other members what to watch for, what possible direction it would be coming from, etc...

Then they can WATCH for trouble as it develops and REPORT activity that would append the original complaint or situation.

Depends on where you live that you would have any first hand experience in these types of community activities and participation.
 
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