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texasemt13

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Is there a site to find a map of the mile posts for a certain rail. I can always hear conductors dispatch when they are blocking certain sections of track (using mile post numbers) but it does me no good when I don't know which roads they are blocking.

My next option would be to train jump with a pencil and Big Chief and start on my cartography merit badge I guess...
 

texasemt13

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sorry

I'm in Central TX around the and specifically around the San Antonio area a lot. Mostly UP and BNSF.
 

burner50

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there are sites that have timetables available for download, but they dont get specific as to which crossings are at what milepost.


You work at Schlitterban? I'll be there an about 2 weeks
 

W9BU

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The SPV maps are printed in England, so they use European paper size standards. The map pages are similar to 8.5 x 11, but not exactly.
 

texasemt13

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thanks

burner50 said:
You work at Schlitterban? I'll be there an about 2 weeks
Sorry, I should update my signature. Last summer was my last season (tourist season that is- no offense). Put in 10 years. If you take your scanner be sure to plug in their channels and the local New Braunfels PD (especially the EVENT channel for the river patrols- you'll hear some crazy stuff). Have fun while your there burner.

Thanks for the sites fellas. Some of you are probably more up to date on railway law but would it be illegal to go to the individual crossings and and walk up and down each way about a mile to get the milepost numbers. I can put them on my own map (I have a very detailed map of where all "my cool sh*t" is located). I guess the question is is it illegal to walk up and down the rail easement?

Thanks- I'd just really love to be able to avoid blocked intersections if I'm going someplace.
 

wbigcount

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If your on the ballast (gravel) then yes its trespassing, normaly they would just ask u to leave but still trespassing.

Normaly the railroad right of way is about 50 feet from the center line of the track, if there is more then one track then about 50 feet from the center of the outside tracks. It could very well be more or less in a given area. Just say off the right of way and we wont call u in lol.

JESSERABBIT said:
I couldn't find the dimensions of the maps on the SPV website. wbigcount, could you please supply them? I am not interested if they are pocket size. Thanks.

The maps are about 8x11, a hair bigger then normal paper
 
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KR4BD

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I have found that the Employee Timetables for Each Railroad show maps and have lists of all the stations, major sidings, hotbox detectors, etc. Mileage points are clearly listed in these Timetables, which are pocket sized booklets to be used and referred to by railroad employees.

Being a railroad buff (models and otherwise), I have found these directories are available at Train tradeshows from the various book dealers. I have in my collection such references from CSX (L&N), NS (Sou) and others. These Timetables are updated frequently and the older versions are the ones that show up at the train shows. Twenty years ago, I could buy them for about $2 or $3 each, but lately, they seem to run around $10. All rules governing the railroad in that region are covered along with other information like speed limits, signals, etc. There are many editons for each railroad so be sure to get one that covers the district you live in>
 

W9BU

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texasemt13 said:
...but would it be illegal to go to the individual crossings and and walk up and down each way about a mile to get the milepost numbers.
You may not have to do that, depending on the railroad.

Every CSX and NS crossing I've seen has a identification plate on the crossing signal or sign. That plate has the FRA crossing number and the milepost, to the hundredth of a mile, for that crossing. Get a map that shows the grade crossing roads and the railroads, then visit each crossing and jot down the milepost for the crossing.

Note that unless you have very good vision, you will probably have to stop at the crossing and maybe get out of your car to read the plate. That may draw some suspicion from passing motorists, so you might want to not linger at the crossing.
 

wbigcount

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W9RXR said:
You may not have to do that, depending on the railroad.

Every CSX and NS crossing I've seen has a identification plate on the crossing signal or sign. That plate has the FRA crossing number and the milepost, to the hundredth of a mile, for that crossing. Get a map that shows the grade crossing roads and the railroads, then visit each crossing and jot down the milepost for the crossing.

Note that unless you have very good vision, you will probably have to stop at the crossing and maybe get out of your car to read the plate. That may draw some suspicion from passing motorists, so you might want to not linger at the crossing.

That is a good idea, on the UP its the same way
 

texasemt13

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Are these signs the ones I see that look like horrible fractions (a multi-digit number over another multi-digit number) off to the sides of the rail at each crossing? I believe they are a white field with black numbering? Just curious- how are the mileposts done? Are they similar to highway mile markers?
 

walterb

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I find it fun to find the hotbox detectors myself. I listen to them then drive and figure out where they are. The ones I've found are always accessible from the road and don't require tresspassing to get to them.
 

W9BU

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texasemt13 said:
Are these signs the ones I see that look like horrible fractions (a multi-digit number over another multi-digit number) off to the sides of the rail at each crossing?
Not sure what you are seeing. Around here, CSX and NS use a plate that is about 5" high by 10" wide that is usually mounted to the cross-buck sign post or crossing signal structure right at the crossing. Black letters on white sign. Usually has the name of the railroad company, the 800 number to call in an emergency, the FRA crossing number, and the milepost of the crossing.

Attached is a sample from along the CSX Crawfordsville Secondary west of Pittsboro, Indiana.
 

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K4DHR

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I have found that the Employee Timetables for Each Railroad show maps and have lists of all the stations, major sidings, hotbox detectors, etc. Mileage points are clearly listed in these Timetables, which are pocket sized booklets to be used and referred to by railroad employees.

Being a railroad buff (models and otherwise), I have found these directories are available at Train tradeshows from the various book dealers. I have in my collection such references from CSX (L&N), NS (Sou) and others. These Timetables are updated frequently and the older versions are the ones that show up at the train shows. Twenty years ago, I could buy them for about $2 or $3 each, but lately, they seem to run around $10. All rules governing the railroad in that region are covered along with other information like speed limits, signals, etc. There are many editons for each railroad so be sure to get one that covers the district you live in>
$10 per only seems to be a very recent development. 2-3 years ago I could pick up an almost new ETT for $4-5. Older ones were still $2-3. eBay bidders have seem to run up the prices on these considerably recently and dealers have been pricing to match. So I just don't buy them anymore unless I find one cheap. They're neat to have, but I'm not forking over that much money for one.

Some railroads have started issuing PDF ETTs for use by dispatchers and other employees that don't have need for a hard copy. Some people may be inclined to share them if you ask nice enough...hint...hint.
 

K4DHR

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Are these signs the ones I see that look like horrible fractions (a multi-digit number over another multi-digit number) off to the sides of the rail at each crossing? I believe they are a white field with black numbering? Just curious- how are the mileposts done? Are they similar to highway mile markers?
UP uses those 1/4 mile mileposts. You'll see ones marked "1/4", "1/2", "3/4" and of course the whole mile one. Allegedly they're to better define the limits of track warrants and maintenance limits, but I can't see whatever potential time savings to outweigh the costs of having to maintain all of those extra signs.

The signs you see at crossings are usually DOT and RR specific crossing IDs. Usually they contain the milepost number as part of the ID for ease of location by MOW forces.
 
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