• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

On This Day *** - - - ***

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kmacinct

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.-- .... -.... ... .--

On this day in 1838, Samuel Morse’s telegraph system is demonstrated for the first time at the Speedwell Iron Works in Morristown, New Jersey. The telegraph, a device which used electric impulses to transmit encoded messages over a wire, would eventually revolutionize long-distance communication, reaching the height of its popularity in the 1920s and 1930s.

Samuel Finley Breese Morse was born April 27, 1791, in Charlestown, Massachusetts. He attended Yale University, where he was interested in art, as well as electricity, still in its infancy at the time. After college, Morse became a painter. In 1832, while sailing home from Europe, he heard about the newly discovered electromagnet and came up with an idea for an electric telegraph. He had no idea that other inventors were already at work on the concept.

Morse spent the next several years developing a prototype and took on two partners, Leonard Gale and Alfred Vail, to help him. In 1838, he demonstrated his invention using Morse code, in which dots and dashes represented letters and numbers. In 1843, Morse finally convinced a skeptical Congress to fund the construction of the first telegraph line in the United States, from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore. In May 1844, Morse sent the first official telegram over the line, with the message: “What hath God wrought!”

Over the next few years, private companies, using Morse’s patent, set up telegraph lines around the Northeast. In 1851, the New York and Mississippi Valley Printing Telegraph Company was founded; it would later change its name to Western Union. In 1861, Western Union finished the first transcontinental line across the United States. Five years later, the first successful permanent line across the Atlantic Ocean was constructed and by the end of the century telegraph systems were in place in Africa, Asia and Australia.

Because telegraph companies typically charged by the word, telegrams became known for their succinct prose–whether they contained happy or sad news. The word “stop,” which was free, was used in place of a period, for which there was a charge. In 1933, Western Union introduced singing telegrams. During World War II, Americans came to dread the sight of Western Union couriers because the military used telegrams to inform families about soldiers’ deaths.

Over the course of the 20th century, telegraph messages were largely replaced by cheap long-distance phone service, faxes and email. Western Union delivered its final telegram in January 2006.

Samuel Morse died wealthy and famous in New York City on April 2, 1872, at age 80.
 

W9BU

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Coincidentally, one of the contestants on Jeopardy last night said that she had her name in Morse code tattooed on one of her feet.

She did not win the competition.
 

kmacinct

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Coincidentally, one of the contestants on Jeopardy last night said that she had her name in Morse code tattooed on one of her feet.

She did not win the competition.
Her WPM must have been too slow!

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SCPD

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Ah !, Samuel Morse’s wonderful code… the delite of many hams, the bain of many hams. I am afraid I fall into that last category. Thankfully Ham radio has progressed beyond it, at least as a requirement for a license… but I do so remember it as quite the stumbling block for me and so many others in earlier, simpler times (the details of which aren‘t important any longer, though I did make it to Advanced Class -somehow, -despite the code.)
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I once knew a fellow who told me it had taken him a year to pass his General Class exam, after losing his un-renewable Novice license. This was back in the days when you would have to wait 30 days between failures before retaking the test- at the FCC.
….. No, it wasn’t the code that got him, it was the theory…he was a Wizz at CW, … 35WPM’s was child’s play to this guy.. He could listen to it and hold a conversation at the same time- verbal and encoded- the words just flowed thru his conscientiousness. He was an absolute dullard when it came to theory (he would actually test the status of his equipment grounds by placing one hand on the radio, another on a good ground…if he got a shock, he’d jiggle a wire and try again!)
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I, on the other hand, always found the code a bore. At my best I could do 15-16 WPM’s, but that was a strain, and I hated….. to……. talk…… like…………..this.
If the gods wanted me to chirp out a conversation in under one week’s time, they wouldn’t have created ‘phone. At least that was the reasoning of this young teenager.
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Never-the-less, I tend to forget this every Blue Moon, and try my hand at a CW QSO. Not long ago there was an ARRL Straight Key Night; and the moon was Blue. I got out my prized ‘straight key’ (I have no other keys)- one given me by my grandfather. He liberated it from his B24 after 30 missions over Germany- he was a ham too- and now its mine.
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So, it was Straight Key Night- the band was 30 metre’s- (I like 30 since it is open all the time, but hate that there is no ‘phone on it- so venture there only on an occasion like this) -I connected a transceiver to my non-resonate terminated long wire and gave a CQ….. Back came an instant reply…………………
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I’m sorry, Jim-in -Maine, but I just couldn’t carry on that QSO! After about 10 minutes I had to sign my 73’s and go get something to drink. Code just isn’t for me.
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I just had to, once again admit to myself that Morse Code will have to be an “acquired” taste….one I don’t care to acquire (I like Brie de Meaux cheese- its very smelly; an “acquired taste”- and not unlike “smelly”-to me- CW……hardly shared by everyone… :) )
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______________________________________________
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If you visit the National Gallery in Washington, take a look at Samuel’s paintings… he was really good!


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............................................CF
 
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SCPD

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#7
Samuel F. B. Morse, Gallery of the Louvre, 1831–1833, oil
(a detail from)
 

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