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Repeater linking

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KE5YOU

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I have been investigating the various VoIP technologies used for linking repeaters together. And I understand that each system is a different way to accomplish the same thing. Echolink, D-Star, Wires, IRLP, etc..... But I am a bit confused. What I don't find is specific information about the strengths and weaknessess of each system. In other words is one sytem better suited for say setting up a series of linked repeaters for wide area coverage or does another system offer better functionality for setup up a temporary patch between two nodes in different states? I know this seems random, but at present I don't have any specific goals in mind. I am just looking for general knowledge on the subject for future experimentation. As such what are some good online/printed resources covering this subject. Thanks for the help.
 

rapidcharger

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D-star isn't voip/roip or analog voice over IP like the others you mentioned, it's digital voice. I'm really not sure why those are blended into the digital voice forum but anyway, echolink being free software to hams and accessible by more nodes, it's easier and cheaper to get started with than IRLP but does require you to keep a windows machine on at all times while you want to have the node online. IRLP requires an IRLP board, actual link radios and a linux machine. IRLP is a lot more expensive to set up a node than echolink but it also sounds better and is more reliable. It's also not as accessible due to the relatively few nodes in comparison to echolink and not having a client for direct use on a computer.

Since you said you don't have any specific goals in mind, one might say that they would probably all get the job done for you, just with varying prices and varying degrees of quality and reliability.

These were the cat's meow back in the day and if you're still on analog. Last time I priced building out an IRLP node it was around $1100. For not much more nowadays you can buy a fairly plug & play digital repeater that doesn't need to have a computer on all the time and sounds a lot better.
 

W9BU

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D-star isn't voip/roip or analog voice over IP like the others you mentioned, it's digital voice.
True. D-STAR also incorporates repeater linking which is the topic of the OP's question.

I'm really not sure why those are blended into the digital voice forum but anyway...
The description of this forum is:
Digital Voice for Amateur Use Discuss use of digital voice technologies on the amateur radio bands. This is to include technologies such as VoIP, P25, DMR/TRBO, NXDN, D-STAR, etc.
Since you can't accomplish VoIP without digitizing the analog voice signal, VoIP repeater linking technologies, such as IRLP and EchoLink are included in this forum even though the on-air signal may still be analog.
 

N8OHU

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D-star isn't voip/roip or analog voice over IP like the others you mentioned, it's digital voice. I'm really not sure why those are blended into the digital voice forum but anyway, echolink being free software to hams and accessible by more nodes, it's easier and cheaper to get started with than IRLP but does require you to keep a windows machine on at all times while you want to have the node online. IRLP requires an IRLP board, actual link radios and a linux machine. IRLP is a lot more expensive to set up a node than echolink but it also sounds better and is more reliable. It's also not as accessible due to the relatively few nodes in comparison to echolink and not having a client for direct use on a computer.

IRLP was specifically designed to keep the radio in Amateur Radio, hence no computer client. Echolink's main problems tend to be users that simply install the software and don't bother the check the sound quality, as if it's adjusted correctly, you likely can't tell the difference between someone on a radio and someone at a computer. And, for what it's worth, it is possible to bridge between Analog Voice (Echolink, AllStar Link and IRLP Experimental Reflectors) and Digital Voice (D-STAR and eventually DMR/System Fusion) so that users of each system can talk using their preferred mode. Heck, I've come into the Experimenter's Corner system (multi-mode digital interlink system) through my Echolink node (N8OHU-L) and talked to guys on D-STAR or the one guy that's currently got his MotoTRBO system connected to us and they couldn't tell much difference from when I come in via D-STAR.


Since you said you don't have any specific goals in mind, one might say that they would probably all get the job done for you, just with varying prices and varying degrees of quality and reliability.

These were the cat's meow back in the day and if you're still on analog. Last time I priced building out an IRLP node it was around $1100. For not much more nowadays you can buy a fairly plug & play digital repeater that doesn't need to have a computer on all the time and sounds a lot better.
My preference would probably be AllStar Link, since you can also provide an interface to the Echolink system that way; AllStar Link, like IRLP, can be set up as the repeater controller, plus it also allows for more complex networking of systems, including remote inputs for a repeater system.
 

QDP2012

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...And, for what it's worth, it is possible to bridge between Analog Voice (Echolink, AllStar Link and IRLP Experimental Reflectors) and Digital Voice (D-STAR and eventually DMR/System Fusion) so that users of each system can talk using their preferred mode. Heck, I've come into the Experimenter's Corner system (multi-mode digital interlink system) through my Echolink node (N8OHU-L) and talked to guys on D-STAR or the one guy that's currently got his MotoTRBO system connected to us and they couldn't tell much difference from when I come in via D-STAR.
Bridging between technologies like that sounds like a useful capability to have in-place, especially if there isn't (yet) a single dominant system used in the amateur community.

I wondered if such bridging was possible and proven. Thanks for the post.
 

N8OHU

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Bridging between technologies like that sounds like a useful capability to have in-place, especially if there isn't (yet) a single dominant system used in the amateur community.

I wondered if such bridging was possible and proven. Thanks for the post.
Yes; the Experimenters Corner has been in operation for nearly a year now and has grown from something like 4 analog to digital bridges to a much larger network that goes across the US and into Europe(via D-STAR) and Australia (Echolink and IRLP Experimental Reflector).

Sent from my ADR8995 using Tapatalk 2
 

jeatock

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All of the JPS stuff is slick.

Icom has introduced their VE-PG RoIP boxes that work perfect with analog radios. I built out an interlinked system with three FR3000's (on 3 frequency pairs in different parts of a county) set up to simulcast any on all. I use a VPN backhaul connection over the public Internet. It is poor man's voting, but works.

Another slick feature of the VE-PG is that it includes connectivity with VoIP telephones right out of the box!
 
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