RSP2 Pro?

Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
131
#9
That's a usb mini-b, the RSP-2 (well all rsp's) takes a usb type-b connector. The cable you're looking for is like the one in your original picture, usb type-a to type-b.

If you can't find one with ferrite cores you can usually purchase the cores separate and wind them onto the cable yourself. I purchased several 1/2 inch snap on cores so I could wind the cable through several times.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
7,195
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#10
Most small cores seen on USB and similar cables are 43 mix material and one pass of a wire through one core will have a very slight reduction of noise in the VHF/UHF spectrum and virtually nothing on HF.

I would use a longer than needed USB cable with no factory ferrite, then wrap 2 or 3 turns around a 43 mix snap on ferrite right at each USB connector. Then wrap 5 to 6 turns around a 31 mix large ferrite snap on bead right after the 43 mix one so you have two different mix cores in series at each end.

This will give you some reasonable choking impedance across most of the HF bands through UHF. In the frequency range where the different ferrites absorption overlap you will get increased choking impedance in that range.
prcguy
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
131
#16
I don't see anything in those results. Like prc said the ferrites that are put on consumer cables are just meant to filter a small bit of RFI to an acceptable level. For radio monitoring you'll need a higher level of filtering with the correct ferrite material. A mix of 31 and 43 would be best. You can find these on amazon or ebay. I would get either a snap on or toroid of each mix for each end and like he said loop your cable though several times.

The more you can loop the cable through the ferrite the higher the impedance. (lower noise). That's why consumer cables with small single pass ferrites are not really ideal.

These are two nice ones here if you're interested.

43 Mix
31 Mix
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2014
Messages
390
Location
UK
#17
An off-the-shelf cable that works well enough, is in the link below. Postage could be a bit high to your location though.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavily-...428890&hash=item4b36ece5f7:g:hEgAAOSwA3dYVr-p

Making up a lead with a ferrite mix, as c_snyder has posted, would do the best job.

It's worth noting though that the SDRplay kit doesn't suffer badly even with a plain cable, though improvements can often be made.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
7,195
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#18
I've run my RSP2pro with and without ferrites on the cable and have not noticed any difference here yet, although I have very effective choke baluns at each end of my antennas.

My main operating position has lots of computer equipment and antenna cables run right next to computers, routers, switching power supplies, etc and was picking up noise and carrying it to the antenna. Placing chokes at the antenna and radio end made a noticeable decrease in my noise floor and removed a lot of birdies.

Every installation will be different, requiring different methods of reducing noise. Its a good precaution to install ferrites on the USB cable but I would rather identify any noise using a separate battery powered receiver, then address problems as they are found. Otherwise you can spend a lot of money on ferrite and filters that may not be necissary.
prcguy

An off-the-shelf cable that works well enough, is in the link below. Postage could be a bit high to your location though.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavily-...428890&hash=item4b36ece5f7:g:hEgAAOSwA3dYVr-p

Making up a lead with a ferrite mix, as c_snyder has posted, would do the best job.

It's worth noting though that the SDRplay kit doesn't suffer badly even with a plain cable, though improvements can often be made.
 
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