Scanners loud enough for tracks

Joined
Jun 1, 2018
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#1
I've got a Uniden BC75XLT and used it at the Indy 500 but had to turn it off because I couldn't hear it over the cars even way up high in turn 3 and with race specific noise cancelling headphones.

I'm looking to get a digital scanner but want to get one that I know will also be loud enough to use at races.

Any suggestions?

Thanks. Sorry if this is in the wrong forum.
 
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#2
Noise-cancelling headphones are not designed for handling extremely loud sounds. Wear good quality in-ear monitor type earbuds (the type designed to block external sound), and then shooting-style earmuffs over the top of those. Most scanners can drive headphones loud enough to cause hearing damage over time. The key is to block external sounds enough so that the background noise is not at ear-damagingly loud levels. By using sound-blocking in-ear phones and over-the-ear muffs, you can hear what's going on in extremely loud environments.

The in-ear monitors by themselves are sufficient on stage at rock concerts.
 

captainmax1

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#6
This is what you need for race tracks: https://racingelectronics.com/collections/headphones-accessories/products/gemini-5-hs
These are the only way to go if you attend Nascar, NHRA, Air Shows or any other loud event. I have been using these for years. Hook them to your scanner and you can easily hear everything you want and also talk to the person next to you if you have 2 or more. Makes all these events a lot more enjoyable.
 

flythunderbird

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#7
I've used a combination of regular old earbuds with 32 NRR earmuffs over them at several NASCAR tracks. The combination works well for me and is pretty inexpensive.
 
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phask

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#10
I've used a combination of regular old earbuds with 32 NRR earmuffs over them at several NASCAR tracks. The combination works well for me and is pretty inexpensive.

Similar here - use my shooting muffs and some Samsung earbuds. Think my muffs are -28 or -30. Use it all the time on the riding lawnmower and leaf blower as well. Volume is usually just 2 clicks above my normal "house" level.


I'd try some of the muffs with the built in earphones - but I'm cheap...
 

dgregjones

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#12
What you need is to have the scanner volume modified through the headphone jack. I have had this done to a few of my scanners with perfect results. Most recently on my BC125AT. Check out the website racescanners.com. I believe the cost is $15 for the modification, and $12 for shipping.
 

UPMan

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#13
Modifying the scanner to increase headphone volume will dramatically increase the risk of hearing loss. The correct answer is to use a noise isolating headset as previously recommended.
 
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#14
What you need is to have the scanner volume modified through the headphone jack. I have had this done to a few of my scanners with perfect results. Most recently on my BC125AT. Check out the website racescanners.com. I believe the cost is $15 for the modification, and $12 for shipping.
All that does is increase the maximum headphone volume to a more ear-damaging level than the background noise. The correct approach is to use a headphone or earbud setup that blocks ambient noise, so that a non-ear-damaging volume level can be heard clearly. The in-ear-monitors I suggested are popular with musicians because they block out background noise onstage at rock concerts (which can be >120dB) and still allow the monitor mix to be heard clearly. Other suggestions, like wearing standard earbuds under shooting earmuffs will also work. Modding the scanner headphone output is just an all-around bad idea.
 
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#15
Speaker impedance can make a huge difference on volume levels. Every so often I'd get a pilot come in with his D/C aviation headset and want an adapter to work on a scanner. Aviation uses 600 Ohms, my BC436HP is 32 Ohms on the headset jack.

600 Ohms is too much load on the audio circuit. In your case I imagine the speakers are closer to 16 to 32 ohms since it was designed for racing.

When you say noise cancelling do you mean active noise reduction or just a foam filled earcup?
There is a wide range of quality in coil cords, maybe what you have flaked out or the scanner jack is worn and don't make good contact.
 
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#16
I've had good luck with a pair of Racing Electronics RE-48 headphones, when I'm out at MIS or Belle Isle (in michigan). Plus they make good noise isolating headphones for an office environment as well. :)
 

conrails

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#17
Radio Sport Headset

I am very happy with the Radiosport headset. VERY comfortable and quiet too. I tested mine by standing very close to a very loud locomotive inside the station. The locomotive noise was drastically reduced and at the same time traffic on the radio (Icom IC-6231) was 100 percent readable. This headset is pricey, but well worth the money. I checked out the reviews on www.eham.net and it gets good marks.
 

W8RMH

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#18
I used a single Kenwood on-ear earphone on my 2-way portable under standard ear muffs when working close to loud aircraft and ground equipment on the airport ramp for years without any issues. I could slightly lift the opposite ear to converse with someone and continue to communicate with the other ear and the shoulder mic.
 
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