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Summit Fire- National Incident Response Ch's in use

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trooperdude

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#1
A number of these were approved by NTIA for use at the Summit Fire in
Santa Cruz County as TAC channels.

For a complete list see:
http://www.apco911.org/frequency/downloads/IracDocument31061-2.htm


INCIDENT RESPONSE PLANS

1. Frequencies 169.5375 MHz, paired with 164.7125 MHz, and 410.2375 MHz, paired with 419.2375 MHz, are designated as the calling channels for initial contact and will be identified in the radio as indicated in paragraph 2. Initial contact will be established using analog FM emission (11KF3E). CTCSS will not be used on the calling channels to ensure access by stations from outside the normal area of operation. The agency in control of the incident will assign specific operational channels as required for incident support operations.

2. The Interoperability frequencies will be identified in mobile and portable radios as follows:

VHF PLAN

Mobile Mobile

Identifier Transmit (MHz) Receive (MHz) CTCSS

VHF Calling 164.7125 169.5375 None

VHF 1 165.2500 170.0125 As required

VHF 2 165.9625 170.4125 As required

VHF 3 166.5750 170.6875 As required

VHF 4 167.3250 173.0375 As required

VHF 5 169.5375 (Simplex) 169.5375 As required

VHF 6 170.0125 (Simplex) 170.0125 As required

VHF 7 170.4125 (Simplex) 170.4125 As required

VHF 8 170.6875 (Simplex) 170.6875 As required

VHF 9 173.0375 (Simplex) 173.0375 As required

UHF PLAN

Mobile Mobile

Identifier Transmit (MHz) Receive (MHz) CTCSS

UHF Calling 419.2375 410.2375 None

UHF 1 419.4375 410.4375 As required

UHF 2 419.6375 410.6375 As required

UHF 3 419.8375 410.8375 As required

UHF 4 413.1875 (Simplex) 413.1875 As required

UHF 5 413.2125 (Simplex) 413.2125 As required

UHF 6 410.2375 (Simplex) 410.2375 As required

UHF 7 410.4375 (Simplex) 410.4375 As required

UHF 8 410.6375 (Simplex) 410.6375 As required

UHF 9 410.8375 (Simplex) 410.8375 As required
 
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#2
At present the National Incident Radio Support Cache has seven tactical, seven command pairs, and seven logistics pairs allocated on a permanent basis. Following some large fires last year in Arizona and southern California people posted monitoring tacs and commands of 8+, as that is what they were called over the air. When I compared their lists to the frequencies shown in the VHF Interoperability Plan I found many, if not all, of these "8+" frequencies came from this plan. I have a suspicion that the 8+ tacs and commands are not assigned permanently, but are assigned on an incident by incident basis. A frequency might be Tac 8 on an incident and later in the season on another incident another frequency from this plan will be assigned and labeled as "Tac 8."

Now that I have a couple of PSR-600's in my listening arsenal, I've programmed all the frequencies in this plan into one scan list. I did not have the memory capacity in previous scanners to do this. I plan to monitor the Interoperability Plan frequencies, along with the Support Cache frequencies that are programmed into another scan list, whenever a large incident occurs. I hope we don't have many large destructive fires this year, but if we do I would encourage everyone to log what they hear and post it on RR. Eventually we might figure out how these channels are being assigned.
 

WayneH

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#3
I'm not sure if it's related or not, as they appeared previous to the fire, but 169.5375 and 170.6875 have appeared active in the Bay Area and are setup in repeater mode. The tone has been 100.0 PL. The only voice has been for testing and a 1kHz tone from test eqp.

Hopefully there will be no conflicts.
 

trooperdude

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#4
Exsmokey said:
At present the National Incident Radio Support Cache
These are different from the Boise cache channels.

Specifically designated for interoperability, and they stick to the channelized
names in the Bendix Kings.

They are also all narrowband.

Interesting on the repeaters. Maybe the mountain-top Roip interconnects they are deploying
all over the bay area ?
 
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#5
My point was that there are 7 permanently allocated NIFC frequencies for tac, command, and logistics and that these interoperability frequencies are separate. The interop freqs. have shown up on various incidents, according to people who have posted on RR, and on those incidents they have been called tac 8 and above.

That is what I tried to say in my previous post, but I guess didn't make that clear.
 
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