• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

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Super antenna

Joined
Apr 11, 2005
Messages
419
Location
Central Mn
#1
For those using this antenna, how well does it work on HF? Pro’s-cons? Another member mentioned this antenna so am researching it. I like the portability and small footprint. Thanks.
 

K5mow

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
76
Location
Webster TX
#2
I am a strong user of the super antenna. I use the MP1 for portable HF work. I have great results on 10 m 20 m and 40 m. These are the only bands I operate on portable operations. I also use their scanner antenna for my scanning needs. It also works very well. Very big fan of the super antenna.

Roger
K5MOW



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ka3jjz

Wiki Admin Emeritus
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
21,729
Location
Bowie, Md.
#5
For those that don't know what is being discussed here...

Super Antenna MP1

This is an antenna that's basically set up for low power amateur radio (QRP) portable work, altho it does say that it covers 7-30 Mhz. I kinda have doubts about that since the loading coils may greatly attenuate frequencies outside the range they are designed for. Mike
 

K5mow

Member
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Joined
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Messages
76
Location
Webster TX
#6
For those that don't know what is being discussed here...

Super Antenna MP1

This is an antenna that's basically set up for low power amateur radio (QRP) portable work, altho it does say that it covers 7-30 Mhz. I kinda have doubts about that since the loading coils may greatly attenuate frequencies outside the range they are designed for. Mike
The coils are tunable. You can actually almost get a one to one SWR on any of the amateur radio bands with the tunable coils. I usually transmit at around 100 W. Believe you can go to 200w.

Roger



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Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
7,704
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#7
The Super Antenna was originally designed by Vern W6MMA but the company name has ended up with Bonnie Crystal KQ6XA. The antennas are now made in China with tremendous markup. At one point they were charging about $40 just for the plastic ruler needed to set the coil to frequency.

You can spend well over $500 on a Super Antenna setup that a simple home made sub $50 antenna will greatly outperform.

For those that don't know what is being discussed here...

Super Antenna MP1

This is an antenna that's basically set up for low power amateur radio (QRP) portable work, altho it does say that it covers 7-30 Mhz. I kinda have doubts about that since the loading coils may greatly attenuate frequencies outside the range they are designed for. Mike
 

15plus1

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Joined
Apr 8, 2010
Messages
290
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The State of Confusion
#8
The Super Antenna was originally designed by Vern W6MMA but the company name has ended up with Bonnie Crystal KQ6XA. The antennas are now made in China with tremendous markup. At one point they were charging about $40 just for the plastic ruler needed to set the coil to frequency.

You can spend well over $500 on a Super Antenna setup that a simple home made sub $50 antenna will greatly outperform.
Any links to plans for it ? Tnx
 

K5mow

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 20, 2019
Messages
76
Location
Webster TX
#13
The Super Antenna was originally designed by Vern W6MMA but the company name has ended up with Bonnie Crystal KQ6XA. The antennas are now made in China with tremendous markup. At one point they were charging about $40 just for the plastic ruler needed to set the coil to frequency.

You can spend well over $500 on a Super Antenna setup that a simple home made sub $50 antenna will greatly outperform.
You are absolutely right but if you don’t want to build it and you want a good working antenna that can be set up literally in minutes and to cover the entire HF band. You just can’t beat it for the money. At least in my opinion.

The buddypoll is also a good choice. You actually have more options with this.

Roger


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Joined
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So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#14
The Super Antenna and Buddipole are sort of ok on 20m and above but stick a wire in the air on 40 and 80m and you will be several S units stronger than the little loaded whips. I run lots of QRP and you have to make up for the low power with an efficient antenna, which the short loaded whips lacking an adequate counterpoise are not.

I designed and made a multiband HF "maypole" antenna years ago and used the telescoping 16ft Buddipole mast as a support. I sent a version to Budd at Buddipole as a possible new antenna for them to market, which they did not, but Budd told me his ham club used it on field day and it was the best performing antenna of its type they had ever used. The antenna was similar to the one in the pdf "brochure" file in post #3 in this thread, but it was fed with balanced line and had common mode chokes. https://forums.radioreference.com/threads/portable-antenna-recommendations.307554/#post2339024

The maypole is obviously bigger than a Super Antenna or Buddipole but it puts the others to shame.

You are absolutely right but if you don’t want to build it and you want a good working antenna that can be set up literally in minutes and to cover the entire HF band. You just can’t beat it for the money. At least in my opinion.

The buddypoll is also a good choice. You actually have more options with this.

Roger


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Last edited:
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
425
Location
Colorado, New Mexico- and now in Washington DC
#16
That is a cute antenna!... (and a Plus+ for their YouTube video's use of the Blue Danube :).)

But as nice looking as it is, its still a very heavily centre loaded short vertical. On 75/80 metre's, even with the radials, its efficiency will be in the low single digit percentages.
Another 'But'-- that's not the end of the world- that translates into only a couple of "S-Units" less than an optimum quarter wave vertical. Unless you really are interested in only NVIS (near vertical incidence skywave,) I'd stay away from anything this short and low , mounted as a horizontal radiator.

I will be quick to point out, that as niffy as its total 7 foot length is, the majority of the antenna's radiation will come from the low Ohmic section below the loading coil... that's a pretty short radiator for any HF vetrical, 40/75-80 especially..... Think of it as owning your own Tesla Coil.

There is no such thing as a "Super Antenna"- that is, short of the old Voice of America arrays... so someone new to HF should not view this as any panacea. Random tuner-end fed long wires on the lower frequencies will out preform this, I fear- and not to mention any number of home made verticals with top loading resonators (I won't get into the physics of where the best places are put the loading coils-- its not generally at the top, btw)-- My favorites use Hustler mobile resonators.

I'll not disparage this cute little thing. I live part time in a very covenant-restricted condo and have thoughts of HF ham radio. This may be what I have been looking for on my balcony.

Always with these short HF antennas, tho-- think of them as very small garages that you are going to try and park inside a very large car --- Something has got to give--- in this case that "give' is going to be in the form of calories heating up those loading coils--- its not going to be in radiation.

Lauri :sneaky:
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
7,704
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#17
I will admit I've had good success with 7ft long "Hamsticks" on 40/80m, but the ground plane used with the Super Antenna and Buddistick is really lacking compared to a large pickup truck with tires insulating it a bit above the earth. The short verticals with radial wires laying on the ground is a recipe for disappointing contacts.

The Super Antenna and Buddipole are sort of ok on 20m and above but stick a wire in the air on 40 and 80m and you will be several S units stronger than the little loaded whips. I run lots of QRP and you have to make up for the low power with an efficient antenna, which the short loaded whips lacking an adequate counterpoise are not.
That is a cute antenna!... (and a Plus+ for their YouTube video's use of the Blue Danube :).)

But as nice looking as it is, its still a very heavily centre loaded short vertical. On 75/80 metre's, even with the radials, its efficiency will be in the low single digit percentages.
Another 'But'-- that's not the end of the world- that translates into only a couple of "S-Units" less than an optimum quarter wave vertical. Unless you really are interested in only NVIS (near vertical incidence skywave,) I'd stay away from anything this short and low , mounted as a horizontal radiator.

I will be quick to point out, that as niffy as its total 7 foot length is, the majority of the antenna's radiation will come from the low Ohmic section below the loading coil... that's a pretty short radiator for any HF vetrical, 40/75-80 especially..... Think of it as owning your own Tesla Coil.

There is no such thing as a "Super Antenna"- that is, short of the old Voice of America arrays... so someone new to HF should not view this as any panacea. Random tuner-end fed long wires on the lower frequencies will out preform this, I fear- and not to mention any number of home made verticals with top loading resonators (I won't get into the physics of where the best places are put the loading coils-- its not generally at the top, btw)-- My favorites use Hustler mobile resonators.

I'll not disparage this cute little thing. I live part time in a very covenant-restricted condo and have thoughts of HF ham radio. This may be what I have been looking for on my balcony.

Always with these short HF antennas, tho-- think of them as very small garages that you are going to try and park inside a very large car --- Something has got to give--- in this case that "give' is going to be in the form of calories heating up those loading coils--- its not going to be in radiation.

Lauri :sneaky:
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2018
Messages
425
Location
Colorado, New Mexico- and now in Washington DC
#18
..........pickup truck with tires insulating it a bit above the earth. The short verticals with radial wires laying on the ground is a recipe for disappointing contacts. prcguy


I hearthly agree... and I think its too bad that more about ground counterpois'ing is not discussed when talking about vertical antennas. No mention, hardly ever, is given until we get to the serious antenna guys (and gals, :)) about ground losses, elevated radials, number/lengrh of radials- etc.
Few hams think scientifically, never realizing that their ground returns can eat up Half ! (3 DB's) of their power if they sloppily Mickey Mouse their designs.

I have urged so many over the years to investigate this science, and for amateurs the ARRL Antenna Book is a great place to start. Unfortunately, so many hams think themselves 'experts'--- and the witchcraft they espouse would be comical if it weren't so tragically wrong.


Ahh, Well........ ;)


Lauri :sneaky:

 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 30, 2006
Messages
7,704
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
#19
A lot of people call themselves experts, but I find the more I learn about antennas more I realize how much I don't know about them.

..........pickup truck with tires insulating it a bit above the earth. The short verticals with radial wires laying on the ground is a recipe for disappointing contacts. prcguy


I hearthly agree... and I think its too bad that more about ground counterpois'ing is not discussed when talking about vertical antennas. No mention, hardly ever, is given until we get to the serious antenna guys (and gals, :)) about ground losses, elevated radials, number/lengrh of radials- etc.
Few hams think scientifically, never realizing that their ground returns can eat up Half ! (3 DB's) of their power if they sloppily Mickey Mouse their designs.

I have urged so many over the years to investigate this science, and for amateurs the ARRL Antenna Book is a great place to start. Unfortunately, so many hams think themselves 'experts'--- and the witchcraft they espouse would be comical if it weren't so tragically wrong.


Ahh, Well........ ;)


Lauri :sneaky:

 
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