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    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

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    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

The Great Unofficial Radioreference FRS/GMRS/MURS Fact Sheet

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#1
The Great Unofficial Radioreference FRS/GMRS/MURS All-Inclusive Fact Sheet

Hoookay. For what it's worth, here is a (rather messy) compilation of some of the most frequently-requested information on these boards regarding operation of the part-95 family/general mobile/multi use radio services (FRS/GMRS/MURS) in the United States. Advantages and disadvantages of each service, as well as comparisons to other services such as HAM and part-90 are avoided to maintain a neutral tone and point-of-view. Hopefully this will answer many of the recurring questions people have and clear up confusion.

DISCLAIMER: This document is for general informational purposes only; NOT intended as legal advice and should not be construed as such. Legal matters should be referred to a qualified attourney or lawyer. All information is considered current as of the date this post was submitted. Since regulations and practises may change over time, it is advisable to consult an official source such as the FCC for the most up-to-date information.

REDISTRIBUTE FREELY!

CONTENTS

1. FREQUENCIES
2. MAXIMUM TRANSMITTER POWER LIMITS
3. BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION
4. LICENCING
5A. TYPE ACCEPTANCE
5B. FINDING TYPE-ACCEPTED TRANSCEIVERS FOR PART-95 USE
6. REPEATERS
7. OTHER FACTS
8. THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS
9. SEE ALSO


================================ FREQUENCIES ================================

Note: Channel numbers are given in this list according to the widely-followed Motorola numbering convention. GMRS channels are also sometimes referred to according to their dial position in kilohertz (e.g. "550" for channel 15) but this is uncommon.

FRS/GMRS
01 462.5625
02 462.5875
03 462.6125
04 462.6375
05 462.6625
06 462.6875
07 462.7125

FRS ONLY
08 467.5625
09 467.5875
10 467.6125
11 467.6375
12 467.6625
13 467.6875
14 467.7125

GMRS ONLY
15 462.550
16 462.575
17 462.600
18 462.625
19 462.650
20 462.675
21 462.700
22 462.725

*Note: for repeater use on 15-22, assume a +5 MHz shift (Tx: 467.xxx/Rx: 462.xxx). Simplex operation is not allowed on 467 MHz GMRS frequencies and are used for repeater input only.

MURS
01 151.820
02 151.880
03 151.940
04 154.570 ("Blue dot")
05 154.600 ("Green dot")


================================ MAXIMUM TRANSMITTER POWER LIMITS ================================

FRS 1-7:
FRS: 0.5 watt
GMRS: 5 watt

FRS 8-14:
FRS: 0.5 watt
GMRS: prohibited

GMRS 15-22 (a.k.a. 550-725)
FRS: not applicable
GMRS: 5 watt (base); 50 watt (mobile/handheld)

MURS
All channels: 2 watt


================================ BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION ================================

FRS/GMRS - All channels
Bandwidth: 11 kHz
Deviation: 2.5 kHz

GMRS ONLY - 15-22*
Bandwidth: 20 kHz
Deviation: 5 kHz

*Note: GMRS may also be worked with 11 kHz bandwidth/2.5 kHz deviation, though most mainstream equipment (e.g. department-store HTs) is fixed for 20/5 operation.

MURS*
Bandwidth
1-3: 11 kHz
4-5: 20 kHz

Deviation
1-3: 2.5 kHz
4-5: 5 kHz

* Note: narrowband (11/2.5) transmissions are also allowed on MURS 4-5.


================================ LICENCING ================================

FRS
No licence required when operating on any channel (1-14) at up to 0.5 watt ERP

GMRS
Licence always required on 15-22 and when operating at power levels greater than 0.5 watt ERP on FRS 1-7
No licence required when operating a combination F/GMRS transceiver on FRS 8-14, or if said device does not exceed 0.5 watt ERP on FRS 1-7.

MURS
No licence required for personal use on any channel

- - - - - - - - - - - -

At the time of this writing, GMRS licencing is handled by the F¢¢. Fee is $85 and the ticket is good for five years. A GMRS ticket is valid for the holder and the immediate members of his family. GMRS licence holder must be aged 18 and up, but the service may be used by his family members of any age. No examination or test/quiz is conducted for GMRS licencing. A part 90/business or HAM radio licence does NOT legally grant any privileges to operate GMRS and vice versa. See also "THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS" below.

People sometimes use handles (nicknames) on all three services. HAM call letters are considered a handle in part-95, as they have no official meaning in these services. If using any handle on GMRS (subject to personal preference), it should be given in conjunction with one's official legal GMRS call, never in place of it. GMRS call letters are not required to be announced on MURS, FRS 1-7 when operating at <=0.5 watt ERP or FRS 8-14.


================================ TYPE ACCEPTANCE ================================

FRS
Equipment must be self-contained; if built to use detachable components (e.g. microphones/headseats) they must be designed specifically for use with their respective transceivers, batteries excepted
Antennae must not be detachable or easily removable
Mobile use permitted, but mobile FRS transceivers are difficult to find

GMRS
Equipment may be self-contained (as in combination FRS/GMRS HTs which are currently very popular in the US) or have detachable components
Transceivers excluding FRS coverage may use detachable aerials, but placement restrictions exist--specifically, antenna cannot exceed 20 feet elevation above ground level. HTs can not have detachable aerials if they include FRS coverage
Mobile use permitted

MURS
Transceivers may use detachable aerials. Antenna height limited to 20 feet above structure (e.g. the peak of a house's roof) or 60 feet above ground, whichever is greater.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

All transceiver equipment used on F/GM/MURS must be part-95 type accepted and meet certain criteria as stated in their respective FCC rules. In general, FRS transceivers cannot have removable aerials; GMRS and MURS radios can have removable aerials (particularly in the case of base or mobile units.) but GMRS transceivers with removable aerials can not be used to transmit on FRS. Tone/code squelch is permitted on all services, although this functionality is sometimes omitted, especially in very low-cost transceivers or children's "toy" HTs where carrier squelch may be used instead. Modifying an F/GM/MURS transciver in ways not intended by the manufacturer or F¢¢ generally voids its part-95 certification and may render it illegal to operate. Equipment can neiter be tunable outside its prescribed frequency bands, nor manually or computer programmable as such. External amplifiers can not be used with any transceiver on F/GM/MURS. These restrictions do not apply to equipment designed specifically for receiving (e.g. a police scanner.)

Many newer imported freeband transceivers marketed for HAM use (Baofeng, TYT, Wouxun, etc.) and modified purpose-built HAM equipment are capable of emulating an F/GM/MURS transceiver. Although sometimes used, such equipment is illegal to operate in these services as they are not type-accepted for part-95 operation, despite extremely lax enforcement by the F¢¢.


================================ FINDING TYPE-ACCEPTED TRANSCEIVERS FOR PART-95 USE ================================

The FCC maintain a searchable database of all transceivers certified for part-95 use on
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm

1. Under "Application Information: Application Status:", select Grant Issued.
2. Under "Equipment Information: Rule Parts (up to three):", select "95A" for GMRS, "95B" for FRS or "95J" for MURS and tick "exact match" (selected by default). It's probably best to search each one individually, as this narrows your search and reduces confusion.
3. Under "Formatting Options: Show results in", select "HTML" (default).
4. Specify number of search results to display (default: 10).
5. Select "Start serach". It may take several minutes to display if a large number of results is given in step 4.

NOSCRIPT USERS: Temporarily allow "apps.fcc.gov" to use the search page.


================================ REPEATERS ================================

Repeaters on GMRS are usually considered to be specifically for the private use of those who operate them, however many individuals and radio clubs operate "open" repeaters intended for public use. Some of these repeaters may require permission from the operators to work them, but not always (although it is considered polite to ask regardless.) A good resource for GMRS repeater information, including non-exhaustive lists of repeaters around the United States is http://mygmrs.com/. At the time of this writing, the ratio of open versus private ("permission required") systems listed in mygmrs seems to be fairly equal (271:308), indicating a slight bias toward private systems.

All repeater and telephone patch operations are forbidden on FRS and MURS. Telephone patches may not be used on GMRS. As far as I know, there is no restriction on an F/GM/MURS operator relaying communications by voice between their respective band and other radio services like CB or HAM, or other media such as Internet chat servers or telephone calls.


================================ OTHER FACTS ================================

FCC RULES
FRS: 47 CFR 95B
GMRS: 47 CFR 95A
MURS: 47 CFR 95J

- - - - - - - - - - - -

FRS and GMRS always use FM (see "BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION" above.) MURS may use other modulation formats, but FM is arguably the most commonly used.

GMRS channels 19 and 21 (650 and 700) are not allowed to be used near the Canadian border.

FRS transceivers are allowed to be used in Mexico on channels 1-14, however care must be exercised to avoid transmitting on GMRS 15-22 if a combination transceiver is used there.

FRS 1 and GMRS 20 are commonly used and advocated as "de facto" calling and emergency channels, especially when travelling. Usually used with CTCSS 141.3 Hz (Motorola QC #22).

It is legal for FRS and GMRS users to communicate with each other. The low maximum power level of FRS devices may cause problems when communicating to a GMRS station over any significant distance.

CTCSS and digital squelch is allowed on all services, and may be required to access repeaters on GMRS. Usage of a CTCSS tone/DCS code is completely optional on any FRS/GMRS/MURS channel, but one is likely to attract more attention using it.

FRS, GMRS and MURS were originally intended to be used for personal communications within one's group, however there is almost nothing prohibiting deviation from this (see next paragraph). There is no "content police" on F/GM/MURS and in some areas, portions of GMRS and MURS are used as an "alternative" HAM service; the subject matter discussed in them might be similar to what one would find scanning the several HAM bands.

Transmission of music is never allowed on any part-95 band including CB. (That includes YOU, "Fisherman" and "Robocop".) Morse code is allowed but rarely used for anything other than distress signals or automatic GMRS repeater self-identification. Data transmissions are allowed on MURS but may be restricted on the other services.

Business use of GMRS is generally prohibited, principally due to (expensive) licencing restrictions and its reclassification as a personal-use radio service in the 1980s. Exceptions exist for businesses licenced for GMRS before revision of the service's rule in the 1980s and are operating under the "grandfather" regulation. Many businesses are now using FRS for this purpose as it is free of such restrictions.

================================ THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS ================================

It is speculated that licencing requirements on GMRS may be either greatly relaxed or completely eliminated in the coming years, and a slightly revised bandplan implemented. One oft-stated example has GMRS being restricted to 2 watts maximum ERP, simplex communications being allowed on the 467 MHz repeater input channels and repeater usage discontinued. The resulting service would be an "extended" 30-channel implementation of FRS and be regulated as such.


================================ SEE ALSO ================================

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/FRS - FRS description on the Radioreference wiki
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/family/ - FRS information from the FCC
http://popularwireless.com/gmrsfaqa.html - FRS/GMRS frequently asked questions

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/GMRS - GMRS description on the Radioreference wiki
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/generalmobile/ - GMRS information from the FCC
http://mygmrs.com/ - GMRS repeater information and directory
http://home.provide.net/~prsg/part95ae.htm - A very in-depth page about GMRS regulations that includes the FCC's rule

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/MURS - MURS description on the Radioreference wiki
http://fcc.gov/encyclopedia/multi-use-radio-service-murs-0 - MURS information from the FCC

http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=47:5.0.1.1.5 - Electronic Code of Federal Regulations title 47 part 95; the official document describing all this stuff (almost reads like an FAQ) (thanks, nd5y)

END
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Messages
325
Location
Idaho
#3
Very good post. Where I get mixed up is where they talk about small base stations, ect. Then they say 50 watts max in the prior section., but don't really say if the 50 watts is for a home station. The 5 and 15 watt stations is pretty well spelled out in the rules, but nothing about the use of 50 watts max. I'd assume that one can have a station in their home with 50 watts or under and no restrictions on antennas up to 200 ft except for the airports. Is that what is legal, I just don't see it spelled out all that well, but the FCC is sometimes vague.

73's John
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2013
Messages
325
#4
Well, according to 95.135, base stations can operate up to 5 watts ERP and "fixed" stations up to 15 watts. Thing is, they don't seem to define or make the distinction between a "base" and "fixed" station, both of which I'd always been taught are alternate terms for "non-mobile" stations.

I'm guessing a "base" station in this case must mean a non-permanent, non-mobile rig running on mains or a battery, whereas a "fixed" station is a permanent non-mobile installation in a building, running exclusively on mains power and with the antenna permanently mounted somewhere in or on that building. That's my best wild guess, anyways.

Yes, reading through part 95, it does seem to be quite vague and poorly-written in some places.....
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2013
Messages
325
#7
You bet.

If people also want to repost it elsewhere on the World Wide Web/Usenet/BBS or wherever, feel free to spread the knowledge. A plain-text file on http://mistman.pdp10.org/pub/radio/frs-gmrs-murs-fact-sheet.txt, if anybody needs it in that format.

"However, you misspelled FCC several times."

Yeah, I need to get a new keyboard. My compose key and several others have been kind of dodgy lately, so I had to substitute upper-case "C"s for the proper cent signs. ;o)

Oh well.
 
Last edited:

SCPD

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
65,126
Location
Virginia
#8
Hoookay. For what it's worth, here is a (rather messy) compilation of some of the most frequently-requested information on these boards regarding operation of the part-95 family/general mobile/multi use radio services (FRS/GMRS/MURS) in the United States. Advantages and disadvantages of each service, as well as comparisons to other services such as HAM and part-90 are avoided to maintain a neutral tone and point-of-view. Hopefully this will answer many of the recurring questions people have and clear up confusion.

DISCLAIMER: This document is for general informational purposes only; NOT intended as legal advice and should not be construed as such. Legal matters should be referred to a qualified attourney or lawyer. All information is considered current as of the date this post was submitted. Since regulations and practises may change over time, it is advisable to consult an official source such as the FCC for the most up-to-date information.

REDISTRIBUTE FREELY!

CONTENTS

1. FREQUENCIES
2. MAXIMUM TRANSMITTER POWER LIMITS
3. BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION
4. LICENCING
5A. TYPE ACCEPTANCE
5B. FINDING TYPE-ACCEPTED TRANSCEIVERS FOR PART-95 USE
6. REPEATERS
7. OTHER FACTS
8. THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS
9. SEE ALSO


================================ FREQUENCIES ================================

Note: Channel numbers are given in this list according to the widely-followed Motorola numbering convention. GMRS channels are also sometimes referred to according to their dial position in kilohertz (e.g. "550" for channel 15) but this is uncommon.

FRS/GMRS
01 462.5625
02 462.5875
03 462.6125
04 462.6375
05 462.6625
06 462.6875
07 462.7125

FRS ONLY
08 467.5625
09 467.5875
10 467.6125
11 467.6375
12 467.6625
13 467.6875
14 467.7125

GMRS ONLY
15 462.550
16 462.575
17 462.600
18 462.625
19 462.650
20 462.675
21 462.700
22 462.725

*Note: for repeater use on 15-22, assume a +5 MHz shift (Tx: 467.xxx/Rx: 462.xxx). Simplex operation is not allowed on 467 MHz GMRS frequencies and are used for repeater input only.

MURS
01 151.820
02 151.880
03 151.940
04 154.570 ("Blue dot")
05 154.600 ("Green dot")


================================ MAXIMUM TRANSMITTER POWER LIMITS ================================

FRS 1-7:
FRS: 0.5 watt
GMRS: 5 watt

FRS 8-14:
FRS: 0.5 watt
GMRS: prohibited

GMRS 15-22 (a.k.a. 550-725)
FRS: not applicable
GMRS: 5 watt (base); 50 watt (mobile/handheld)

MURS
All channels: 2 watt


================================ BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION ================================

FRS/GMRS - All channels
Bandwidth: 11 kHz
Deviation: 2.5 kHz

GMRS ONLY - 15-22*
Bandwidth: 20 kHz
Deviation: 5 kHz

*Note: GMRS may also be worked with 11 kHz bandwidth/2.5 kHz deviation, though most mainstream equipment (e.g. department-store HTs) is fixed for 20/5 operation.

MURS*
Bandwidth
1-3: 11 kHz
4-5: 20 kHz

Deviation
1-3: 2.5 kHz
4-5: 5 kHz

* Note: narrowband (11/2.5) transmissions are also allowed on MURS 4-5.


================================ LICENCING ================================

FRS
No licence required when operating on any channel (1-14) at up to 0.5 watt ERP

GMRS
Licence always required on 15-22 and when operating at power levels greater than 0.5 watt ERP on FRS 1-7
No licence required when operating a combination F/GMRS transceiver on FRS 8-14, or if said device does not exceed 0.5 watt ERP on FRS 1-7.

MURS
No licence required for personal use on any channel

- - - - - - - - - - - -

At the time of this writing, GMRS licencing is handled by the F¢¢. Fee is $85 and the ticket is good for five years. A GMRS ticket is valid for the holder and the immediate members of his family. GMRS licence holder must be aged 18 and up, but the service may be used by his family members of any age. No examination or test/quiz is conducted for GMRS licencing. A part 90/business or HAM radio licence does NOT legally grant any privileges to operate GMRS and vice versa. See also "THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS" below.

People sometimes use handles (nicknames) on all three services. HAM call letters are considered a handle in part-95, as they have no official meaning in these services. If using any handle on GMRS (subject to personal preference), it should be given in conjunction with one's official legal GMRS call, never in place of it. GMRS call letters are not required to be announced on MURS, FRS 1-7 when operating at <=0.5 watt ERP or FRS 8-14.


================================ TYPE ACCEPTANCE ================================

FRS
Equipment must be self-contained; if built to use detachable components (e.g. microphones/headseats) they must be designed specifically for use with their respective transceivers, batteries excepted
Antennae must not be detachable or easily removable
Mobile use permitted, but mobile FRS transceivers are difficult to find

GMRS
Equipment may be self-contained (as in combination FRS/GMRS HTs which are currently very popular in the US) or have detachable components
Transceivers excluding FRS coverage may use detachable aerials, but placement restrictions exist--specifically, antenna cannot exceed 20 feet elevation above ground level. HTs can not have detachable aerials if they include FRS coverage
Mobile use permitted

MURS
Transceivers may use detachable aerials. Antenna height limited to 20 feet above structure (e.g. the peak of a house's roof) or 60 feet above ground, whichever is greater.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

All transceiver equipment used on F/GM/MURS must be part-95 type accepted and meet certain criteria as stated in their respective FCC rules. In general, FRS transceivers cannot have removable aerials; GMRS and MURS radios can have removable aerials (particularly in the case of base or mobile units.) but GMRS transceivers with removable aerials can not be used to transmit on FRS. Tone/code squelch is permitted on all services, although this functionality is sometimes omitted, especially in very low-cost transceivers or children's "toy" HTs where carrier squelch may be used instead. Modifying an F/GM/MURS transciver in ways not intended by the manufacturer or F¢¢ generally voids its part-95 certification and may render it illegal to operate. Equipment can neiter be tunable outside its prescribed frequency bands, nor manually or computer programmable as such. External amplifiers can not be used with any transceiver on F/GM/MURS. These restrictions do not apply to equipment designed specifically for receiving (e.g. a police scanner.)

Many newer imported freeband transceivers marketed for HAM use (Baofeng, TYT, Wouxun, etc.) and modified purpose-built HAM equipment are capable of emulating an F/GM/MURS transceiver. Although sometimes used, such equipment is illegal to operate in these services as they are not type-accepted for part-95 operation, despite extremely lax enforcement by the F¢¢.


================================ FINDING TYPE-ACCEPTED TRANSCEIVERS FOR PART-95 USE ================================

The FCC maintain a searchable database of all transceivers certified for part-95 use on
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm

1. Under "Application Information: Application Status:", select Grant Issued.
2. Under "Equipment Information: Rule Parts (up to three):", select "95A" for GMRS, "95B" for FRS or "95J" for MURS and tick "exact match" (selected by default). It's probably best to search each one individually, as this narrows your search and reduces confusion.
3. Under "Formatting Options: Show results in", select "HTML" (default).
4. Specify number of search results to display (default: 10).
5. Select "Start serach". It may take several minutes to display if a large number of results is given in step 4.

NOSCRIPT USERS: Temporarily allow "apps.fcc.gov" to use the search page.


================================ REPEATERS ================================

Repeaters on GMRS are usually considered to be specifically for the private use of those who operate them, however many individuals and radio clubs operate "open" repeaters intended for public use. Some of these repeaters may require permission from the operators to work them, but not always (although it is considered polite to ask regardless.) A good resource for GMRS repeater information, including non-exhaustive lists of repeaters around the United States is myGMRS.com - GMRS Repeater Directory. At the time of this writing, the ratio of open versus private ("permission required") systems listed in mygmrs seems to be fairly equal (271:308), indicating a slight bias toward private systems.

All repeater and telephone patch operations are forbidden on FRS and MURS. Telephone patches may not be used on GMRS. As far as I know, there is no restriction on an F/GM/MURS operator relaying communications by voice between their respective band and other radio services like CB or HAM, or other media such as Internet chat servers or telephone calls.


================================ OTHER FACTS ================================

FCC RULES
FRS: 47 CFR 95B
GMRS: 47 CFR 95A
MURS: 47 CFR 95J

- - - - - - - - - - - -

FRS and GMRS always use FM (see "BANDWIDTH/DEVIATION" above.) MURS may use other modulation formats, but FM is arguably the most commonly used.

GMRS channels 19 and 21 (650 and 700) are not allowed to be used near the Canadian border.

FRS transceivers are allowed to be used in Mexico on channels 1-14, however care must be exercised to avoid transmitting on GMRS 15-22 if a combination transceiver is used there.

FRS 1 and GMRS 20 are commonly used and advocated as "de facto" calling and emergency channels, especially when travelling. Usually used with CTCSS 141.3 Hz (Motorola QC #22).

It is legal for FRS and GMRS users to communicate with each other. The low maximum power level of FRS devices may cause problems when communicating to a GMRS station over any significant distance.

CTCSS and digital squelch is allowed on all services, and may be required to access repeaters on GMRS. Usage of a CTCSS tone/DCS code is completely optional on any FRS/GMRS/MURS channel, but one is likely to attract more attention using it.

FRS, GMRS and MURS were originally intended to be used for personal communications within one's group, however there is almost nothing prohibiting deviation from this (see next paragraph). There is no "content police" on F/GM/MURS and in some areas, portions of GMRS and MURS are used as an "alternative" HAM service; the subject matter discussed in them might be similar to what one would find scanning the several HAM bands.

Transmission of music is never allowed on any part-95 band including CB. (That includes YOU, "Fisherman" and "Robocop".) Morse code is allowed but rarely used for anything other than distress signals or automatic GMRS repeater self-identification. Data transmissions are allowed on MURS but may be restricted on the other services.

Business use of GMRS is generally prohibited, principally due to (expensive) licencing restrictions and its reclassification as a personal-use radio service in the 1980s. Exceptions exist for businesses licenced for GMRS before revision of the service's rule in the 1980s and are operating under the "grandfather" regulation. Many businesses are now using FRS for this purpose as it is free of such restrictions.

================================ THE FUTURE OF FRS AND GMRS ================================

It is speculated that licencing requirements on GMRS may be either greatly relaxed or completely eliminated in the coming years, and a slightly revised bandplan implemented. One oft-stated example has GMRS being restricted to 2 watts maximum ERP, simplex communications being allowed on the 467 MHz repeater input channels and repeater usage discontinued. The resulting service would be an "extended" 30-channel implementation of FRS and be regulated as such.


================================ SEE ALSO ================================

Family Radio Service - The RadioReference Wiki - FRS description on the Radioreference wiki
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/family/ - FRS information from the FCC
Popular Wireless Magazines: GMRS & FRS Frequently Asked Questions - FRS/GMRS frequently asked questions

General Mobile Radio Service - The RadioReference Wiki - GMRS description on the Radioreference wiki
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/generalmobile/ - GMRS information from the FCC
myGMRS.com - GMRS Repeater Directory - GMRS repeater information and directory
GMRS Rules - A very in-depth page about GMRS regulations that includes the FCC's rule

Multi-Use Radio Service - The RadioReference Wiki - MURS description on the Radioreference wiki
Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) | FCC.gov - MURS information from the FCC

eCFR — Code of Federal Regulations - Electronic Code of Federal Regulations title 47 part 95; the official document describing all this stuff (almost reads like an FAQ) (thanks, nd5y)

END
Looks good so far the only thing is everyone has speculations and IMO those should be left out of the equation.If it isn't we will have more people coming up with the same speculations that have been beaten to death and the newbies interested in GMRS will be in total confusion.

I thought you didn't like GMRS and didn't use it anymore but I may be wrong.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2013
Messages
325
#9
I put the speculation bit in for completeness, since that's one of the questions that comes up from time to time, albeit not as frequently as some of the others.

"I thought you didn't like GMRS and didn't use it anymore but I may be wrong."

No, that's HAM radio, and that may be changing (to some extent) within the forseeable future. I've always been somewhat partial to the part-95 services.
 
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#10
Wirelessly posted (Opera/9.80 (BREW; Opera Mini/6.0.3/27.2338; U; en) Presto/2.8.119 320X240 LG VN530)

A base station is just that, a station permanantly or temporarily installed in your home. It can be a handheld, mobile or base radio, attached to an outside antenna. A base station may also operate as a control station.
A fixed station was a class of station that was meant for point-to-point communications. It could not operate within a large urban area, as defined by the FCC; it was restricted to using a directional antenna with a minimum 15 decibel front-to-back ratio; it was limited to 15 watts TPO; and it could communicate only with another fixed station. It was prohibited from communicationg with base stations, mobile stations, or through a repeater.
You were prohibited from communicating between two base stations, and an entity couldn't even have 2 base stations within 40 miles of each other, so a fixed station had to be licensed. I don't have access to the current rules to see what they say about that now.
There is also some confusion about small base stations and base stations (and small control stations and control stations.) The differences between a small base/control station and a base/control station are: A small base/control station is limited to 5 watts ERP; they may operate on channels 1-7 and 15-22 (which includes through a repeater when operating as a small control station); and may have an antenna height of no more than 20' above the ground, or above the building or tree upon which it is mounted.
A base/control station may use up to 50 watts TPO with no ERP limit; may operate on channels 15-22 only (whether directly as a base station, or through a repeater as a control station); and has no antenna height limitations below 200', unless you live near an airport. (Local zoning ordinances and CC&R's notwithstanding.)
I hope this helps to clear up some misunderstandings of the station classes.
 
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#11
Just thought I would add my two cents in reference to Canada and these services. I think it is relevant as many Americans do travel into Canada. Here in Canada the FRS and GMRS frequencies are identical to the American ones except that there is no provision for GMRS repeaters in Canada. The frequencies used for GMRS repeater inputs in the USA are assigned to other services in Canada. That means that in Canada the only GMRS xcvrs available are the typical FRS/GMRS handhelds. As for licencing, an American bringing such a handheld into Canada should not be concerned about authorization because neither FRS or GMRS require any kind of licence in Canada. I am guessing that is due to the absence of repeaters or any other high power provisions in the Canadian version of GMRS. On the other hand there is no MURS in Canada and those VHF frequencies belong to licenced business users in Canada, so MURS radios are not allowed.
 

SteveC0625

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#12
Just thought I would add my two cents in reference to Canada and these services. I think it is relevant as many Americans do travel into Canada. Here in Canada the FRS and GMRS frequencies are identical to the American ones except that there is no provision for GMRS repeaters in Canada. The frequencies used for GMRS repeater inputs in the USA are assigned to other services in Canada. That means that in Canada the only GMRS xcvrs available are the typical FRS/GMRS handhelds. As for licencing, an American bringing such a handheld into Canada should not be concerned about authorization because neither FRS or GMRS require any kind of licence in Canada. I am guessing that is due to the absence of repeaters or any other high power provisions in the Canadian version of GMRS. On the other hand there is no MURS in Canada and those VHF frequencies belong to licenced business users in Canada, so MURS radios are not allowed.
Good info to know. One question, though. Is there a power limit on FRS or GMRS in Canada? There's more than a few of us with 25 to 50 watt mobiles in our vehicles and it would be good to know before using them north of the border.
 
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#14
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Darth_vader said:
Two watts maximum, if I recall correctly (novascotian?)
That is correct. As well only radios with non-removeable antennas are approved for GMRS/FRS in Canada. I believe, but could be wrong, the repeater inputs are no longer assigned to LMR users, IC moved existing lMR users to other frequencies and is holding those 467.xxxx GMRS repeater input frequencies in reserve in case IC decides to allow repeaters on GMRS 'some day down the road' in Canada.
 
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#16
Yes I did know the 467 inputs were being held but my understanding was that previous users were grandfathered there rather than moved... but I could be wrong.
That could be, I have not done a range search on spectrum direct. As such there may or may not be LMR users on this frequencies


Sent from an unknown place...
 
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Vancouver, BC
#17
GMRS is fairly quiet most days here in Vancouver. On GMRS one I hear a repeater ID (morse) regularly, not a full quieting signal, originating somewhere south of the border.

North of the border the place having the most FRS (or possibly GMRS) activity is typically a ski hill. Very busy then.

Given the no-license nature I'm a little surprised GMRS isn't more popular here.

Mike
 
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Location
Idaho
#19
Note also as was mentioned by one other post. An antenna can be no more than 20' off the ground or 20' over a building it is attached to. If put on your roof, you can add quite a bit of transmit/receive distance to your station; see all the other regs that go along with this.
John
 
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#20
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In the USA, the 20' rule applies to small base stations, when operating on the 7 shared GMRS/FRS channels. There is also the 5 watt ERP limit.
It does NOT apply to regular base/control/repeater stations, when operating on the main 462/467 MHz GMRS-only channels, with up to 50 watts TPO, and no ERP limit.
The small base station class was meant to allow you to attach a GMRS-only handheld radio to an external antenna and communicate with other GMRS licensees and FRS users on channels 1-7, while maintaining the small footprint that these particular frequencies are, by design, limited to.
Regular base/control/repeater station antenna heights are only limited by CC&R's, and local zoning ordinances, or your proximity to an airport/heliport.
 
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