• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.
  • Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Utility pole cell antennae?

Status
Not open for further replies.

troymail

Silent Key
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
9,977
Location
Supply (Lockwood Inlet area), NC
#1
Joined
Mar 7, 2002
Messages
2,542
Location
New Orleans region
#2
What's wrong with using a utility pole? back in the very early 90's, I worked for the A carrier cellular company that served the New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Houma area of Louisiana. Many of their cell sites used wooden utility poles.

Back in those days, it took an equipment shelter to hold all the equipment. Now these mini cells are housed in a small cabinet that can be attached to the utility pole. So the only footprint on the ground is the pole itself. Does the utility company require a permit to install a pole in the right of way. In most cases the answer is no.

With the cellular companies going to smaller cell sites due to the increased demand for service, the height of these antennas is getting lower to the ground so the channels or frequencies can be used again much closer than with a high antenna. If this cell company has figured this out and saw the use of a wooden pole as the support structure for their antennas, they are ahead of the game. It costs much less for a wooden pole than a steel mono pole or tower. It takes less space and is accepted by everyone because all the telephone and electric companies use them all over the country.

I think the zoning people are facing a backlash if they dig their heals in on this one. The court fight will probably go against them and they will end up paying court and legal expenses that the people will re bell against for spending public funds on this idea that they don't have total control.

I am trying to stay neutral on this one and just explain that this is not a new idea that just cropped up over night. It was done 25 years ago and didn't cause a problem in multiple jurisdictions way back then.
 

jaspence

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
1,673
Location
Michigan
#3
Utility pole antenna

There are several antenna arrays on the towers that carry long distance power transmissions in Michigan. One of our high schools even leased their football field light posts for cell use. A good way to use available resources without buying up property and costs of building a structure.
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
10,213
Location
Point Nemo.
#4
Yes, the technology is there, but the service requirements are a bit different.

The expectation that your cell phone is going to work 100% of the time is often there, but in reality the cell phone companies don't look at it that way. Sure, these small cells have a battery backup, probably a few hours from the size of the battery they have. They also rely on fiber optic cable run along the poles, which is fairly reliable, but not fool proof. RF output of these system is in the 10 - 30 watt range.

For a public safety system, you'd want a longer battery backup. Likely the fiber plant would be underground for a bit more protection.

But, sure, no reason it couldn't happen. The agency would lease the space on the pole, power in from the utility, fiber in from underground.

These are often called "Distributed Antenna Systems". I've got these at work. The system is run by Crown Castle and all 4 of the big carriers are on it. There is an optical cabinet at the cell site. They take a padded down RF feed off the cellular base station and feed it to the cabinet. The RF signal gets converted to an optical signal and gets sent out over our fiber plant. At the far end, there is a box that converts the optical signal back to RF and feeds the panel antennas. Makes it much easier to cover our site with lower profile antennas.
The optical system that's used, manufactured by Andrews, will support RF down to 70MHz and up to 2400MHz, depending on the modules installed. We've looked at putting our 800MHz trunked system on a similar platform.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
85
Location
Knox / Roane / Loudon counties, Tennessee
#5
FirstNet is already in the works for public safety.

This sounds like a rehash of picocell or something similar, but I didn't read too deeply into the article once I saw Prince George County. That's like a whole other planet.

Where I live in a rural to urban area, DAS doesn't really offer many benefits. I look forward to greater penetration of fiber; we don't really have any kind of non-microwave backbone in many parts of my region.
 

KE5MC

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
760
Location
Lewisville, TX
#6
Jim,
I think the issue is who owns the pole and was permission asked and given. Like you I don't see anything wrong with using a wooden pole if you own it. :D

Mike

What's wrong with using a utility pole? back in the very early 90's, I worked for the A carrier cellular company that served the New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Houma area of Louisiana. Many of their cell sites used wooden utility poles.

...snip...
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top