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Pro-106: Voltage from Power adapter

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Most all sophisticated consumer electronics have internal voltage regulators to take the input down to a very stable particular value. The Pro-106 & Pro-197 regulators take the input voltage (including from the battery) down to 8V (in the Pro-197) and 3.3V.

The power supply that shipped with the Pro-197 makes over 20 Volts unloaded and about 16V connected with the scanner on. Yet the input spec is 13.8. (I'll have to measure the one for my Whistler 1095 just for curiosity.)

In order for a battery to charge (any chemistry as far as I know) it needs to see a voltage higher than its own or current will not flow into it. The external supply probably delivers about 10 volts which is likely what you are reading. The battery charging circuit also has a regulator, current instead of voltage. Yes over 9V could be safely applied to those batteries. I can't say how accurate the metering of it is.

Fully charged 4 NiMH cells will deliver about 5V, 4.8V nominal operating.

These type of regulators require a voltage notably above the intended output or it won't regulate or it shuts down. That means in order for the 3.3V regulator to do its job it needs a value above what is called the drop out threshold. I don't know what this is for the specific part inside and it can change from one model run to the next as the manufacturer sources different parts. But for example it could be that at 3.5V the part will shut down, and thus the radio. 9.8V is a respectable value as is 4.8V.

I don't know the limits for the 106 (and again that can vary over time) but I can tell you the parts in the 197 handle over 30 volts unless there's something seriously wrong.
 
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Seaside,Oregon
#6
Most all sophisticated consumer electronics have internal voltage regulators to take the input down to a very stable particular value. The Pro-106 & Pro-197 regulators take the input voltage (including from the battery) down to 8V (in the Pro-197) and 3.3V.

The power supply that shipped with the Pro-197 makes over 20 Volts unloaded and about 16V connected with the scanner on. Yet the input spec is 13.8. (I'll have to measure the one for my Whistler 1095 just for curiosity.)

In order for a battery to charge (any chemistry as far as I know) it needs to see a voltage higher than its own or current will not flow into it. The external supply probably delivers about 10 volts which is likely what you are reading. The battery charging circuit also has a regulator, current instead of voltage. Yes over 9V could be safely applied to those batteries. I can't say how accurate the metering of it is.

Fully charged 4 NiMH cells will deliver about 5V, 4.8V nominal operating.

These type of regulators require a voltage notably above the intended output or it won't regulate or it shuts down. That means in order for the 3.3V regulator to do its job it needs a value above what is called the drop out threshold. I don't know what this is for the specific part inside and it can change from one model run to the next as the manufacturer sources different parts. But for example it could be that at 3.5V the part will shut down, and thus the radio. 9.8V is a respectable value as is 4.8V.

I don't know the limits for the 106 (and again that can vary over time) but I can tell you the parts in the 197 handle over 30 volts unless there's something seriously wrong.
Very nice! Thank you! So as for using the new Lithium type Batts non-rechargeable are about 1.82 volts ea. should be no problem? Great info for the external power supply,wide open the adapter is 14 volts
 

gewecke

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Very nice! Thank you! So as for using the new Lithium type Batts non-rechargeable are about 1.82 volts ea. should be no problem? Great info for the external power supply,wide open the adapter is 14 volts
No, that's not ok, if you like your scanner. But its your choice. 73, n9zas
 
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