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waterproofing antenna cable

Joined
Feb 17, 2012
Messages
190
Location
Lockport NY
#1
i just purchased a new cable run for my rooftop antenna it looks like it has a heat shrink wrap around it already do i need to do anything more? i was thinking about putting a little silicone at the tiny gap between the n connector and the top of the heat shrink.


IMG_20190310_093351.jpg
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2019
Messages
19
#2
Personally, I wouldn't worry about it. It really isn't that big-a-deal, there will always be some moisture, unless it's especially conductive, it won't matter.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
106
Location
Olathe, Kansas
#6
I would wrap the whole thing in Buytel tape after connecting to antenna. If not water will get into the connection and fail. Wrap above and below connection point.
 

buddrousa

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
5,118
Location
NW Tenn
#7
Did you look at the link?
This is how every Commercial Antenna is sealed.
This is how every Ham Antenna is sealed.
This is how I sealed my CB connectors in the 1970's.
This is how they seal Cell Phone Tower Antenna's.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 17, 2012
Messages
190
Location
Lockport NY
#8
Did you look at the link?
i did but i dont use any pigtails the n connector would screw directly into the antenna so i am not quite sure what do do with the metal part or the n connector at the butt of the antenna. i will also add that the connector is at the bottom of the antenna vertical and there is a pipe that covers the bottom of the antenna and the antenna cable itself. maybe i should just silicone the outside of the pipe fitting?
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
9,880
Location
Point Nemo.
#10
If you want your new cable and antenna to last, you need to listen to buddrousa. Water will find a way in. That water will cause corrosion that will run down the copper in your new coaxial cable and destroy it in short order. All the labor you spent putting it in will be wasted. You'll need to replace the entire cable.
Industry standards are to wrap the entire connection with a layer of electrical tape to ease disassembly later.
Follow that up with a layer of butyl tape molded in around all the connections.
Put another layer of electrical tape over all that to protect it from ultraviolet light.

The heat shrink tape is a nice addition and helps with strain relief, but it's not a replacement for proper waterproofing.

There are a lot of people that do not properly waterproof their connections and "get away with it" for a certain amount of time, however, that shouldn't be taken as a reason to not properly waterproof your own connections.
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2008
Messages
3,070
Location
New Zealand
#12
My outdoor antenna connections are kept dry with an 'umbrella' made from a pill bottle. Drill a hole in the cap of a size to be a tight screw-on to the socket - cut the very bottom off the bottle - or if you are fitting the connector yourself drill a hole to fit the cable and slide it down the cable first. Put a blob of sealant onto the top of the cap and screw it onto the connector, then connect the plug and then fit the pill bottle to the cap - done. Stays dry and you've made a home for the spiders!
 

buddrousa

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
5,118
Location
NW Tenn
#13
But still if not sealed the moister in the air will still get in the connector but each his own and what works for you.
I have antenna's I sealed 30 years ago still sealed dry and working.
 

iMONITOR

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
5,967
Location
MACOMB, MI.
#14
My outdoor antenna connections are kept dry with an 'umbrella' made from a pill bottle. Drill a hole in the cap of a size to be a tight screw-on to the socket - cut the very bottom off the bottle - or if you are fitting the connector yourself drill a hole to fit the cable and slide it down the cable first. Put a blob of sealant onto the top of the cap and screw it onto the connector, then connect the plug and then fit the pill bottle to the cap - done. Stays dry and you've made a home for the spiders!
I would think windy rain storms would get up under there.
 
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
9,880
Location
Point Nemo.
#17
And that's why if you hang around long enough, you'll hear talk of "gas proof" or "gas tight" connections. That means air tight, as in no damp air gets in and condenses.

@op, do whatever you want, but there's a lot of experienced people giving you sound advice. Looks like you spent some good money on pre-terminated cables. No point in letting that go to waste to save a few bucks on the proper waterproofing materials.
 
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