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Which Of The Big Three Japanese Amateur Radio Manufacturers Will Start Adding DMR First?

bharvey2

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Same here. When I got my CS-700, I had to learn by doing. I did not have any examples to reverse engineer.

I’m in the process of building a 21 zone analogue/digital codeplug for my XPR-7550. Fun times.


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I agree it can be done and should be part of the learning curve. I was a fairly early adopter of DMR so most people in my area (San Francisco area) were using Motorolas. I downloaded a codeplug for my radio from an area far from me. As a result, it was of no use other than to see the structural components. After that, I always started from the beginning when I bought a new radio> I much prefer it that way now as I can organize things the way I want them to be.
 

kayn1n32008

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Same here. When I got my CS-700, I had to learn by doing. I did not have any examples to reverse engineer.

I’m in the process of building a 21 zone analogue/digital codeplug for my XPR-7550. Fun times.


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Up to 24 or 25 zones. It’s a ton of work when starting from scratch.


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AK_SAR

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My, my.... I find it mildly amusing that there is so much heartburn and angst about DMR! :)

First off, regarding the original question on this thread, any speculation about which (if any) of the "big three" will add DMR is just that, pure speculation. Companies do what they think is in their best interest to do. And the reasons are often not obvious to the casual observer.

Regarding DMR itself, I don't quite get why people have their undies in such a knot about it. Here locally in Alaska, it isn't yet widely used, but interest is growing. In some parts of the country it seems to be very popular, for example in Washington and Oregon (check out Pacific Northwest DMR - Homepage). Most of my DMR experience has been while traveling in the PNW, and I've found it works quite well. I'm relatively new to amateur radio, yet I successfully built a code plug for my AT-868, all by myself. That code plug isn't as neat and pretty as it could be, and I'll no doubt do a cleaner one next time, but it wasn't nearly as tough to do as some people make it out to be.

Regarding ARES adding DMR, in addition to analog, what's the big deal about that? Yeah, if you want to do more than analog with ARES, then you'll need to buy a DMR radio. Just like if you want to do Winlink with ARES you will need to buy a computer and a TNC. In either case, you buy the gear to support the activities you want to participate in. And last time I checked, participating in ARES was totally voluntary. If you don't want to do ARES, don't join. You probably won't be missed.

Regarding radios, the "CCR" meme is getting a bit tiresome and out of date. Yes, there are some low quality Chinese radios on the market. There are also some quite good ones. I've had my Anytone AT-D868UV for over a year now, and it has proven to be a fine radio. Don't take my word for it, check out the review in the November 2018 QST magazine. And the latest QST has a review of the newer and updated AT-878UV. I also own a Kenwood TH-D74, and to me the Anytone feels more solidly built than the Kenwood. An additional bonus (for me) is that the Anytone is Part 90 certified. As a long time member of several volunteer SAR teams, I'm authorized to use several Part 90 frequencies on missions and training. While I normally use my issued Motorola HT on missions, it's nice to know that in a pinch I can also use my personal radio.

That's my two cents worth.
 

w2xq

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This thread has wandered from the OP's original question. My guess? The "big three" each have their own modes as discussed above, and I don't see any adding DMR to their product lineup in the foreseeable future. But never say never...
 

alcahuete

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I have yet to see a use case for digital voice on amateur radio that justifies making the expenditure and segregating hams further than we are already segregated.
Well how about this use case...on one system in Southern California, using my XPR5550e with roaming and audio leveling, I can drive from Las Vegas to deep south of the Mexico border, 100% static free, and without ever changing the frequency manually or adjusting the volume. Literally no touching my radio for hundreds of miles. Greatest thing since sliced bread, and you can't do that on analog.

Emergency services? I was out boating on Lake Mojave last summer pretty far away from services, and without phone coverage. Came across a boat with a medical emergency. Couldn't hail anyone on Marine Radio. Couldn't find anyone on GMRS. Jumped on a couple local-ish analog ham repeaters and nobody was listening. Jumped on a DMR repeater, tuned to one of the talkgroups (don't remember if it was California or Socal) and got an immediate response from dozens of hams. I could have gotten on any talkgroup from very local to worldwide, and I GUARANTEE somebody would be listening and could offer assistance. Somewhere in the world, somebody is listening. With a local analog repeater, if nobody is listening, nobody is listening.

If you want to talk segregation, the fact of the matter is that analog repeaters by their very nature segregate the amateur community. Sure, there are some linked systems out there, but few and far between. You jump on an analog repeater and you're only going to talk to your small local segregated community, in most instances. Digital brings the entire world together. I can jump on my HT and talk shop with another ham in Italy 24/7 and regardless of propagation. Good luck doing that on VHF/UHF analog.
 

alcahuete

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This thread has wandered from the OP's original question. My guess? The "big three" each have their own modes as discussed above, and I don't see any adding DMR to their product lineup in the foreseeable future. But never say never...
Eventually, I think they are going to adopt a "standard" and that standard will be DMR. D-Star is nowhere close to being as popular as DMR, and Yaesu basically gives away their Fusion repeaters to attempt to get people to use the mode. What did most people do the first round of Yaesu giveaways? They converted the repeaters to DMR. LOL!!

At some point, the Big 3 are going to realize that if they want to sell radios, they are going to have to conform. They aren't going to have a choice. The CCRs are destroying their sales, partly because of the price, partly because of the mode. They'll catch on eventually. ;)
 

buddrousa

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The UGO did not make the big 3 in the US cut prices. Now the UGO is gone and they are still raising prices.
 

kayn1n32008

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I've gotten pretty proficient at writing codeplugs for my DMR radios. I have no problem starting from scratch and building up the codeplug. That being said, I learned an awful lot by looking at one that was already built to see how things are constructed. "Reverse Engineering" as it were.
It’s been time consuming, close to 12 hours so far, but I wrote a 24 zone, 364 channel analogue/DMR conventional codeplug.

It’s not quite done though. There is a local Brandmeister repeater I need to research and figure out what talkgroups I would be interested in on it. Likely once done, my codeplug will be between 390 and 400 channels.

It’s been quite satisfying creating this codeplug. It is my first time really using TRBO software.


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bharvey2

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It’s been time consuming, close to 12 hours so far, but I wrote a 24 zone, 364 channel analogue/DMR conventional codeplug.

It’s not quite done though. There is a local Brandmeister repeater I need to research and figure out what talkgroups I would be interested in on it. Likely once done, my codeplug will be between 390 and 400 channels.

It’s been quite satisfying creating this codeplug. It is my first time really using TRBO software.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Well, that's a pretty good sized code plug for sure. I've never used TRBO software but I assume that is pretty well written and intuitive to use. When I first started programming the DMR codeplugs, many of the radio programs didn't allow you to do things like reorganize zones or channel lists. That was a true PITA. As a rule, I like to organize my zones geographically so that as a travel in a particular direction, I only need to move up one zone as a I travel, If a new repeater were to come on line in a particular area, being and to place it in the correct order in my zone list was highly desired. Much of the older software didn't permit this. N0GSC Contact Manager has made this a lot easier at least for DMR radios designed for the ha market. Does the TRBO software permit this type of reorganization?
 

bharvey2

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I'll help. I've been wondering about who might be the first to step into the DMR market. I always figured it would be Kenwood as they already produce DMR radios in their commercial lines. Yeah, they've got skin in the DStar game but they cover several modes in their commercial lines so it isn't much of a stretch. Maybe a multimode?
 

ke6gcv

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I'll help. I've been wondering about who might be the first to step into the DMR market. I always figured it would be Kenwood as they already produce DMR radios in their commercial lines. Yeah, they've got skin in the DStar game but they cover several modes in their commercial lines so it isn't much of a stretch. Maybe a multimode?
I've always been brand loyal to Yaesu. The FT-416 was the first HT I've ever used and liked. Since then, I was hooked on the brand! But I won't lie... Kenwood has caught my eye lately. Anyway...

Though I'd like to think Yaesu will jump on the DMR bandwagon, I don't think it'll happen any time soon... If at all. I, too, think it'll be Kenwood.

I say that because they're beginning to include Icom's proprietary D-Star into their radios. Starting with the TH-D74A handheld. Plus, like bharvey, said, they already have a decent NXDN/DMR commercial product line.
 

AK_SAR

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I, too, think it'll be Kenwood.

I say that because they're beginning to include Icom's proprietary D-Star into their radios. Starting with the TH-D74A handheld. Plus, like bharvey, said, they already have a decent NXDN/DMR commercial product line.
You could be right, that Kenwood might do it.

I like my Kenwood TH-D74A. My dream radio would be if they took that radio, added DMR, Part 90 cert, and made it to IPX-7 waterproof standard. (Of course it would no doubt cost a couple of thousand $$. :( ) My alternative dream is that Anytone will come out with a version of their 878 with full APRS, KISS, IPX-7, and of course keep it Part 90 certified.

Dream on. :)
 

kayn1n32008

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You could be right, that Kenwood might do it.

I like my Kenwood TH-D74A. My dream radio would be if they took that radio, added DMR, Part 90 cert, and made it to IPX-7 waterproof standard. (Of course it would no doubt cost a couple of thousand $$. :( ) My alternative dream is that Anytone will come out with a version of their 878 with full APRS, KISS, IPX-7, and of course keep it Part 90 certified.

Dream on. :)
I don’t think the big three will bring DMR to a part 97 radio simply because it is not designed for ham use.

Why would the big three want to compete with the low cost garbage DMR equipment that hams seem to be drawn to?


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ke6gcv

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I like my Kenwood TH-D74A. My dream radio would be if they took that radio, added DMR, Part 90 cert, and made it to IPX-7 waterproof standard. (Of course it would no doubt cost a couple of thousand $$. :( ) My alternative dream is that Anytone will come out with a version of their 878 with full APRS, KISS, IPX-7, and of course keep it Part 90 certified.

Dream on. :)
That would be awesome! I'd buy that!
 

kayn1n32008

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Because they do not want to buy a $1000 Motorola DMR Radio is the first thing that comes to mind.
I would never pay $1000 for an XPR-7550. Even used they are easily found for less than US$500.

I traded a radio that I paid CA$200 for, for my XPR-7550.

Deals are out there, be patient, good deals can be found.


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buddrousa

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And you end up with a Frankenstein Motorola that has been backyard depot built that can not be repaired when you could have bought a legit Motorola with warranty that can be repaired. The locals here want over $500 for a XPR6550 oh and by the way it needs a battery.
 
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