• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Who enforces HF frequency ranges?

Status
Not open for further replies.

SAR923

Active Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
1,511
#2
Essentially no one. The International Telecommunications Union-Radio is supposed to do frequency allocations but it has no enforcement power except to complain to the home country of a station that's operating out of band and hope they will do something about it. A good example is the 40 meter ham band (7.0-7.3 MHz). Way back in the time of dinosaurs, when I first started listening to shortwave radio, you would hear nothing but hams in that frequency range. A few big broadcasters like Radio Moscow invaded during the 70's and then it became pretty much a free for all, since the 40 meter band offers decent day and night coverage. You can barely hear any hams now because of all the shortwave stations in 40 meters.
 
Joined
Mar 6, 2004
Messages
1,359
Location
Paige, Republic of Texas
#3
40 meters is only a world wide ham band from 7.0-7.1. It is and has been a broadcast band from 7.1 to 7.3 out side of region 2 (the americas). They are not invaders, are operation within the ITU guide lines.

As users transition from HF to Satcoms the ITU is looking at re-allocation of some of the unsed freqs to broadcasting to allow amateur radio to a primary in the 40 meter band from 7.0-7.3 world wide to allow hams to "better provide disaster relief communications".
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2007
Messages
1,843
Location
Jackson Square, East Weymouth, MA.
#5
Actually the 40 meter ham band here in the United States and Region 2 in general are getting easier to operate in. Many of the old super stations of the past have since gone quiet, Radio Moscow is a mere shell of itself in it's many incarnations today. There was a meeting of all the world authorities back a few years ago and it was agreed to not construct new transmitting facilities in Region 1 and 3 countries on the 7100-7300 range, unless there was no other frequency available. Also pre-existing stations have agreed that when it comes time for replacement of transmitters or frequency shifts, they will move out of the segment. Once again this is dependent upon availability of frequencies out of the range.

Forty meters has gotten much quieter in recent years for a number of reasons, which also include better quality receivers with DSP and other filtering techniques. More directive antenna installations from the big gun stations in Region 1 and 3 have aided in this, too. And of course many broadcasters are just shutting down whole segments of broadcast programming all together. This is due to money, and to the governmental shift to more domestic operations in the short range bands, like FM bands. Propaganda transmissions nowadays are limited in scope, compared to what it was during the Cold War years, too. These are still on the air, but very few broadcasters are doing it.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
1,058
#6
Bottom line, 'enforcement' of HF assignments is by international treaty between the countries involved. A country could, of course, refuse to be part of these interlocking treaties. If they don't cause trouble (follow the layout anyway), no one would care a lot, probably. If they DO cause 'problems' (jamming, whatever), you're into the whole international power game. Do we send them a 'stern note'? Impose financial santions? Do we bomb the interfering station as a 'subtle hint' of displeasure? Depends on the country causing trouble, and the one feeling annoyed.
 
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
34
Location
Katy, TX (Houston)
#7
Thanks for the replies. When my friends talk about how the world will never get along, I can agree with them :) but still point to HF as an excellent example of international cooperation.
 

ka3jjz

Wiki Admin Emeritus
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
21,675
Location
Bowie, Md.
#11
Please guys keep it on topic...it's an interesting quandry, and it all comes down to getting along with your neighbor - even if they're half a world away.

73 Mike
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
207
Location
Arkansas' Ozarks
#12
Time was when FCC and other nations (England for one, via BBC) operateded Monitoring Stations that routinely prowled the spectrum for interlopers as well as rules violations. The one us Midwesterners used to watch out for was in Grand Island, Nebraska. In addition, the guys from the regional FCC officers, while moving around covering paperwork and such used to monitor locally too. It kept all of us a bit more honest and interested in complying with the laws.

Internationally, proven and outright violations of International Spectrum allocations and treaties are largely officially complaioned about by the State Department and FCC through letters. And, that has little clout these days either.

It once was a great time to be interested in radio purely for radio's sake. I'm glad I got in on some of those great times circa 1930s-1950s. A whole different kind of fun and sense of accomplishment.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top