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Old 08-07-2005, 6:08 PM
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kf4lne kf4lne is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bristol, VA
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On one side of teh SO239 will be the threaded part where teh coax connects and on teh other side will be the solder tabs. Just put the vertical element in that center pin on teh solder side of the SO239 and solder it. As far as using the brass tube for the low band antenna, use at least 3 or 4 feet of it, that way you have a good, sturdy antenna that will be more resistant to bending in the wind. Just to give you an idea of how far you can go with solid copper wire before it is too long to use for an antenna, take a length of wire, hold out horizontally. If it starts to bend then its too long to use by itself and you will have to find something that is made of a more rigid material, like brass tubing. You may also have to use brass tubing or something moe rigid than wire for the low band radials too since they will bend when they get that long, I suggest using brazing rod and brass tubing, you can use teh brass tubing to extend the length of the brazing rod by cutting the brass tubing in lengths of about 2 inches and inserting the brazing rod into the tubing and soldering that with a propane torch or a really hot soldering iron. Brazing rod can be picked up at welding supply shops and is typically made from a copper or brass alloy that can be easily soldered to, basically brazing rod is a welding rod used for copper and br**** commonly used to "braze" oxegen lines and other such types of plumbing as well as used in copper art work. Also commonly used during the installation of ground planes at AM radio towers, not a fun task in the middle of July since AM radio tower bases do NOT have any shade beyond the support for the base insulator. I know this to be true because a few years ago before WTZK became WWRN and moved TX locations I was involved in the TX site preeparations and transmitter installation. That was one hell of a feat, the antenna was a 50.13 ohm load at 1.35MHz We were happy because that meant we didnt need a very exspensive coupling box (the dog house at the base of the tower)

EDIT: had to show the pic of the monster. i took this pic while taking a break in the shade at the bottom of the tower. That antenna is cut for 1.35MHz and is around 180 ft tall

http://www.azuma.ath.cx/kf4lne/stuff/DCP_0048.JPG
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Last edited by kf4lne; 08-07-2005 at 6:34 PM..
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