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Old 09-19-2018, 12:38 PM
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Default Why the change in Antenna jack?

I own a Yaesu Ft60r and am considering purchasing a used Yaesu Ft65r.

Then I noticed that the Ft60 has a female SMA antenna jack while the Ft65 has a male SMA jack?

Why would a company design two nearly identical radios (functionally speaking) and put two different antenna jacks on them?

Is there something I don't understand about this stuff or did Yaesu have a stupid moment?
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Old 09-19-2018, 1:14 PM
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The newer radio connector is either better or most likely cheaper.

Frank
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Old 09-19-2018, 4:47 PM
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Default Antenna connector

The FT-60R is an older design, while the newer 65 follows the trend for newer Chinese radios. If you use an adapter, it can cause extra stress on the radio end due to the increase in length.
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Old 09-19-2018, 4:48 PM
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Maybe less expensive but I think it is a design thing. tt was a fuss when they changed from BNC to SMA a few years ago too. It is smaller so takes up less area inside the radio and can accommodate a smaller more streamlined antenna than a BNC connector can. Maybe less leverage against the plastic case of the radio than a BNC if handled incorrectly or dropped.

With the two different SMA connectors it may be that it is more common to use one than the other on the radio itself in more recent designs and that accommodates a larger variety of after market antennas that people want to use. Maybe the change was to go with the flow?

Maybe they like the male SMA on the radio as it is more flush mounted so less leverage against the radio if mishandled. Less likely to break the connector on the radio.

Last edited by K7MH; 09-19-2018 at 5:01 PM..
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Old 09-19-2018, 4:58 PM
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BNC connectors have disappeared from almost every new radio.
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Old 09-19-2018, 5:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaspence View Post
BNC connectors have disappeared from almost every new radio.
Yes I edited some since I started out in the wrong direction.
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Old 09-19-2018, 7:49 PM
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The FT-65 is made in China to Yaesu's specs. This could explain the antenna jack. If you don't like the jack, you could spend a few bucks more and get an FT-70 with digital capability. Or get an FT-60 while they are still available. I think the male SMA may be more mechanically sound. Every major antenna manufacturer is making models for both types of connectors. BNC's were always a poor choice mechanically. TNC never caught on, but was more robust than either BNC or SMA. Some old Motorolas used TNC's.
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Old 09-20-2018, 3:21 PM
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When you look at it, the "reverse SMA" design as first encountered on the Chinese radios is actually a better design. On the FT-60R if the antenna takes a blow, it could snap off the connector flush with the radio, necessitating a major disassembly of the radio to replace, whereas the connector on the FT-65 would shear off at the base of the antenna and all that would have to be done is unscrew the threaded portion of the connector from the radio.
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Old 09-20-2018, 4:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k6cpo View Post
When you look at it, the "reverse SMA" design as first encountered on the Chinese radios is actually a better design. On the FT-60R if the antenna takes a blow, it could snap off the connector flush with the radio, necessitating a major disassembly of the radio to replace, whereas the connector on the FT-65 would shear off at the base of the antenna and all that would have to be done is unscrew the threaded portion of the connector from the radio.


Motorola, MA/COM, Kenwood, Simoco, Tait and others have been using SMA male (on the radio side) on their radios for two decades now. Vertex was really the last wide spread commercial hold out.

My guess, when Motorola fully absorbed the Vertex product at the first of the year, it really limited the large orders for SMA female chassis mounts causing the prices to increase.


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Old 09-20-2018, 8:59 PM
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And, whether it's a male or female connector on the radio, most of the supplied antennas require that the center pin rotate relative to the female socket when installing or uninstalling the antenna (or adapter). This is a no-no. The center pin and its socket should remain motionless relative to each other. Otherwise, the plating could be rubbed off thus changing the RF characteristics of the connector.

The commercial radio manufacturers know that, in their market, users don't install and uninstall the antenna frequently. The radio gets handed to a user as a tool and the user usually doesn't go running off to connect the radio to a crappy mag-mount antenna. Hams, of course, don't understand the problem and just keep wearing away at their SMA connectors.
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Old 09-21-2018, 4:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronicsdude View Post
Yaesu is trying to cut corners and see if the public will buy a rebadged Baofeng aka a Chinese radio, why?
I cannot speak to the Yaesu FT-65 which the OP is comparing to, but I own and have tested a Yaesu FT-4XR.

The FT-4XR is not a re-badged Baofeng. It does not program like a Baofeng and it does not have the transmitter spurious emissions that a Baofeng UV-5R, UV-5X3, or BF-8HP have.

It's noteworthy that the Anytone AT-3208UV, also a "cheap Chinese radio", doesn't have the spurious emissions that the Baofengs I've tested have.

My assumption is that two factors may be at work: 1. Yaesu's engineers and designers were influenced by the knowledge they gained while Yaesu was owned by Motorola Solutions. As has been noted above, the recent trend in commercial radios is to have a male SMA in the body of the radio. 2. Yaesu's engineers and production planners were influenced by the preponderance of male SMA PCB-mount connectors on radios made in China. My assumption is that Yaesu is sub-contracting the production of the FT-65 and FT-4X to a Chinese manufacturer (not just re-badging an existing Chinese radio). The Chinese radio industry appears to have thousands of male SMA PCB-mount connectors in the pipeline and it might have cost Yaesu a few pennies more to specify a female SMA connector.
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Last edited by W9BU; 09-21-2018 at 5:23 AM..
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Old 09-21-2018, 8:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronicsdude View Post
What other kind of radio has a backwards SMA connector?

Kenwood LMR, Motorola(but unique specs for the connector), CSI, Tait(I believe) Harris LMR(I believe)

Better design to have the male connector on the radio.



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Old 09-21-2018, 9:02 AM
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Default Why the change in Antenna jack?

Quote:
Originally Posted by k6cpo View Post
When you look at it, the "reverse SMA" design as first encountered on the Chinese radios is actually a better design.

It’s not a ‘reverse SMA’. Reverse SMA is used for 802.11 stuff where the centre pin is reversed in the connector.

What you call reverse SMA is pretty much normal on LMR gear outside of Vertex and Icom gear.

Most hams never knew this, because they are too cheap, and never used LMR gear. Then the CCR’s appeared that used the same connector as most LMR companies and they started calling it backwards. Yet to those of us that use/work in the LMR industry they just had normal connectors.


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Old 09-21-2018, 2:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronicsdude View Post
My opinion:
Yaesu is trying to cut corners and see if the public will buy a rebadged Baofeng aka a Chinese radio, why?
What other kind of radio has a backwards SMA connector?
And the lowest version Yaesu, ft-4Vr does it not have built in FM radio 65-108 MHz and flashlight?

Neither the FT-65 or the FT-4 are "rebadged Baofengs." They are Yaesu radios through and through. The only difference is they have features that are included in the very popular Baofengs. If the only HT choices out there were Baofeng or these two Yaesus, I'd buy the Yaesu first.
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Old 09-21-2018, 2:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronicsdude View Post
You know what I mean.....

A new connector so your current antenna collection doesn't fit! How's that better?

I myself would not buy the new yaesu walkie talkie lineup, but if you want to, go for it.


Besides a couple Icoms and a Yaesu, most of my gear is Kenwood LMR so it’s what I call normal.


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Old 09-25-2018, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W9BU View Post
The FT-4XR is not a re-badged Baofeng. It does not program like a Baofeng and it does not have the transmitter spurious emissions that a Baofeng UV-5R, UV-5X3, or BF-8HP have.
Agreed. Yaesu didn't simply rebadge Baofengs, but the FT-4XR could be characterized as what a Baofeng radio could have been, if the UV-5R types had been made better. The FT-4XR uses the same RDA1849S "transceiver on a chip" that is used by many of the cheap Chinese HTs, along with the RDA5802 chip for the broadcast FM receiver. Internal photos of an FT-4XE (European version of the FT-4XR sold in North America and other places) can be seen at:

https://qrpblog.com/2018/09/yaesu-ft...all-a-baofeng/

Some like to point out the older FT-60R is still a superior radio due to its wide-band receiver (not as much to be heard there, with increasing use of digital modes over analog modes). Yaesu's published specifications show the FT-4XR, as well as the slightly larger FT-65R dual-band HT, are very similar to the FT-60R. I have used my FT-4XR to work FM satellites, and its receiver - although not as sensitive as other HTs like my Kenwood TH-D72 or TH-D74 - can do the job.

Chinese factories are capable of making quality products. Apple has its iPhones, iPads, and iPods made in China ("Designed in California, Made in China" is what Apple proclaims on the packaging for those items). My Wouxun KG-UV9D was tested at last year's ARRL Southwestern Division convention in California, and easily met the Part 97 spectral purity requirements, where none of the Baofeng HTs tested out there passed the same test. Yaesu appears to be enforcing quality control for its Chinese production line. I haven't seen any mentions of the FT-4XRs or other new Chinese-made Yaesu HTs having the issues like the Baofengs. The Yaesu HT's aren't as cheap as the Baofengs, but there is something to "you get what you pay for"...

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