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Old 02-12-2016, 10:53 PM
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Default Dual Band Mobile In Late Model Car?

My previous mobile installation was 10 years ago in a 2006 Mustang GT. No issues. I'm considering a mobile installation in my 2015 Honda CR-V. I'm leery of installing a two way radio in a nearly new car, as new vehicles are so heavily computer controlled compared to older vehicles. I seem to recall issues in the past with Toyota Camrys and mobile two way radios causing Toyota computer issues. Is anyone here operating a two way radio in a newer car such as 2015 or 2016 model? I am active in UHF-VHF, mostly Fusion digital, and would like to install a dual band radio in my Honda. Any comments about amateur radio mobiling in late model vehicles?
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Old 02-12-2016, 11:27 PM
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Yeah, lots of us are, not to mention all the late model police cars running 100 watt radios.

Following proper installation should prevent most issues. Tapping into existing wiring is almost always a bad idea. OK with ignition sense circuits, but all your power should come right off the battery.
Ground the radio. At the radio. Short ground lead to body metal. Don't rely on the negative power lead as the ground.

Antenna installation should be done just as carefully. Proper NMO or similar high quality permanent mount with a good ground. Keep it away from the windows so the RF isn't blasted in through the windows. Center of the vehicle roof is ideal. Use high quality coax with properly installed connectors.

Run all wiring, power and coax, away from other vehicle wiring. If you must cross existing wiring, do it at a 90˚ angle.

Only time I've ever had an issue with a modern vehicle is when I've cut corners. Usually easy to prevent.
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Old 02-12-2016, 11:35 PM
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I have the same problem. I have a 2016 Sorento. There aren't many placed to put a radio. I had planned on removing the face plate and mounting the radio under the front seat. Well, both seats have too much stuff under them (heater vents, electronics, etc.). There's zero room under the back seats (actually the middle seats). For logistical reasons, I don't want to mount it all the way in the back.

I'm not worried too much about interference problems. I'm guessing there's more shielding in the sensitive areas since everyone is big on Bluetooth and Wi-Fi now.
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Old 02-12-2016, 11:48 PM
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I've installed dual-band radios and used them for years in several Honda and Acura models - to include a 2003 Pilot, a 2006 Ridgeline, and a 2008 Acura. No problems.

-John AC4JK
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Old 02-13-2016, 2:24 PM
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So far, no issues in a 2015 Corvette.
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Old 02-13-2016, 6:21 PM
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2014 Toyota Corolla here, currently only using a handheld UHF DMR radio (Tytera) with an external antenna. No problems, in fact an improvement over either a Wouxun dual-band handheld or a Connect Systems UHF DMR. Both of those get interference from the car on a local UHF repeater frequency - 444.100. The Tytera seems immune to whatever is producing the on-board interference.
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Old 02-14-2016, 8:05 AM
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I installed a Kenwood TM-V71A under the driver seat of my 2015 Kia Soul. The face plate is remote mounted using a suction cup mount on the windshield near the driver side "A" pillar and power is taken directly from the battery. I have a Comet SS680B NMO mounted using a Laird trunk lip mount mounted on the left rear corner of the hatchback. No problems even while using 50 watts on occasion.
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Old 02-14-2016, 8:15 AM
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Default Mobile in new car

I have a new C-Max Hybrid, and have had no trouble (except for space) in my car. I use P25, DMR, and analog, 2 meter through 900 mhz, and have had no interference problems with the radio to car or car to radio.
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Old 02-14-2016, 11:03 PM
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I have plenty of real estate in my 2013 GMC Sierra (there is a reason I don't buy trucks with full consoles). But that truck is setup for hand held control heads. Unfortunately, it'll probably be another 10 years before amateur manufactures begin offering those (they are generally 10-20 years behind the commercial industry when it comes to mounting solutions).


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Old 02-18-2016, 6:40 AM
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Some tips:

Get a ham radio with a detachable face plate. Stick the main radio body in the trunk or under your front seat if you have space. Run the power cable direct to the battery. If you can't or don't want to do this, use your cigarette lighter/power outlet. But do not operate the radio on high power for a prolonged period of time. You will heat up the wiring..and if the wire is thin enough, it might start an electrical fire. Of course, don't forget your antenna. The best spot is the middle of the roof. Next best spot would be the trunk lid. Try not to pinch the coax bringing it in. If you buy a mag mount antenna, don't forget to take it down and put it in your trunk when using the car wash.

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