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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 11-10-2006, 2:56 PM
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Exclamation LVMPD N.V. Codes

* "Code Red" if the channel is reserved for an emergency and
* "Code 4" when an emergency was over.
* I heard "Code 5" meaining "activate the jail camera". This is used when a person being transported (492) to jail wigs out. A bunch of jail personnel come outside to meet the patrol car, a jail supervisor comes out and one of the jail personnel will have a camera to record the incident. They'll attempt to talk to the person and calm them down, if they refuse to calm down the prisoner will be restrained in a chair so they're unable to hurt anyone or themselves.
* and the code "30" is supposed to mean "Does not conform to rules." but I've never heard either one used.
* Thanks to Jason Jasper for reminding me of "Code 3": respond with lights and sirens.

When an officer is finished with an event, he'll usually announce CLEAR and then give a disposition code from the list at the end of the chart.

For those of you who have followed this list since I started it in the early 1990's, you'll notice a few changes. First, I removed 402A (Arson). It might be a real code but it's not used by a patrol unit or dispatcher. The 412 codes haven't been used in atleast the last four years. There were a whole host of other changes made, thanks to "James." As most of you know, I don't live in Nevada any longer so it makes it hard for me to keep up on changes.


Event Codes
Code Meaning Code Meaning
401 Accident 426 Rape
401A Hit and Run
401B Accident with Injury 427 Kidnap
401C Accident on private property 428 Child molest
402 Fire 429 Indecent exposure
403 Prowler 430 Animal Complaint
404 Unknown trouble
404A 9-1-1 disconnect
405 Suicide
406 Burglary 431 Missing/Found property
406A Burglary alarm
406V Burglary from vehicle 432 Fraud
407 Robbery
407A Robbery alarm
408 Intoxicated person 433 Stolen property
409 Intoxicated driver 434 Illegal Shooting
410 Reckless driver
411 Stolen Vehicle 437 Civil Standby (keep the peace)
438 Traffic problem
439 Welfare Check
411A Recovered vehicle 440 Wanted suspect
413 Gun 441 Malicious destruction
413A Knife 442 Aircraft emergency
413B Other deadly weapon 442A Emergency Landing
414 Grand larceny 442B Plane down
414A Petty larceny 443 Assist officer
414C Larceny from person 444 Officer needs help
415 Assault/Battery 444A Panic alarm at Metro facilities
415A Assault with a gun 445 Explosive device threat
415B Assault with other deadly weapon 446 Narcotics
415C Negative injury drive-by shooting 447 Civil matter
461 Non-criminal detail
416 Fight 463 Investigation
416A Juvenile disturbance 465 Stakeout
416B Other disturbance 467 Vehicle stop
417 Family disturbance 468 Person on foot
418 Missing person 469 Bar/parimeter check
418A Found person 480 Maintenance (usually getting gas)
418B Runaway 481 Detail
419 Deceased person 482 Lunch
483 Coffee
420 Homicide 484 Court
421 Sick or injured person 486 Shooting Range
421A Mentally ill person 487 Out of service, vehicle
422 Injured officer 485 Community Contact (mostly going to the restroom)
423 See person for info
424 Abuse/neglect (alt: riot) 492 Transport
425 Suspicious circumstances
425A Suspicious person 494 Out of vehicle
425B Suspicious vehicle
Disposition Codes
A Arrested K Requires officers report
B Citation issued L Handled by other jurisdiction
C Report only M Subject warned and advised
D Arrest and report
E Citation and report O False alarm
F Unfounded P Refused to sign a complaint
G Dispatch canceled Q Handled by other unit
H Gone on arrival R Radio broadcast only
I Unable to locate S Non-criminal detail complete
J Settled at scene T Report taken under different event number
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2006, 4:39 PM
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In the early portion of my U.S. Forest Service career we used ten codes in the USFS Southwest Region (Arizona and New Mexico). In 1981 transferred to an Intermountain Region (southern Idaho, Utah, western Wyoming, Nevada, and a small area of California) Forest (Toiyabe) where 45% of the Ranger District's lands were in California, we used the clear text list published by CDF. This not only for fire, but for all other functions as well. This was probably because ICS implementation was further along in California than in other parts of the county. Mutual aid and interagency relationships were far more advanced in California than in New Mexico where I had transferred from.

With all due respect to Harry Marnell's comments, at least in the fire services, the use of clear text has made things much clearer and was simple once everyone got past the "we always have done it this way" syndrome. The clear text for acknowledging a transmission is "copy" and for yes is "affirmative." To acknowledge a dispatch you merely say "copy, responding." The old 10 code of "10-73" (fire or smoke report, which one was not clear) has been replaced with "fire traffic" or "fire report" and "smoke report" or "smoke observed." Clear text is not really plain English but some prescribed short words of phrases meant to communicate the same thing. It is really a shorthand, but easier for the uninitiated to understand. Thus codes don't really save much time to pronounce.

If anyone remembers the 70's movie "What's Up Doc" with Ryan O'Neil and Barbra Streisand, might understand my thoughts whenever I hear someone acknowledge a transmission with "roger." The movie was a parody on the 60's spy movies and TV and a butler or someone involved in the plot was named "Fritz." O'Neil and Streisand would acknowledge his statements with "roger" and the butler would always follow it with "no it's Fritz." Maybe you just had to be there!

As for using code on the phone here is one experience of mine. On occasion when I've been out of town calling 911 has become necessary. One of these times came when I witnessed a very violent incident outside a restaurant with a bar near Mission Bay in San Diego. It occurred as I was exiting my car to check into a motel late at night after getting off a long ocean fishing trip where we returned in a small charter vessel during a storm. I guess the nausea and being up all night during the storm the night before was affecting my cognitive process, and I could not speak in normal English. I could only say "415 loud verbal just went physical, in progress, HBD subject breaking out vehicle windows where a daughter and son-in-law are seeking refuge, vehicle late 80's SUV white over blue, subject description WMA, late 50's, salt and pepper, unknown eyes, 6-2, 250, wearing blue shirt, tan pants, additional, possible 273.5 or 245, WMA down in vicinity, bleeding and LOC evident." This was followed by location information. I was not asked to repeat anything and only my callback number (the front desk of the motel) was asked for. Officers arrived on scene in less than 2 minutes. I'm not a wannabe as I ended up doing exactly what I wanted to do for a career. I've had some incidents where I requested armed assistance for family disturbances in campgrounds. On this night in San Diego I just could not come up with the words as my brain just went to the shorthand. I usually use codes on the phone only with dispatchers in the local area who remember me on the job. I try to stay away from any codes other than using the APCO phonetics if I'm asked to spell something. If you can do it correctly and quickly I think it saves time.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2006, 1:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PolarBear25
What do you use of 10-33 EMRGNCY TRFFC?? Code Red?? And do you use 998 O.I.S. 999 Officer Needs Help??
Emergency traffic. Unit: "Officer needs help" or "10A47, officer needs help/assistance." Dispatch: "All units stand by...officer needs help/assistance (or 10A47 needs help/assistance), 10A47 go ahead..."

The requesting unit can normally be identified by dispatch via the radio's digital broadcast signal and the last known location via the CAD system. "Officer needs help" is when an officer requires immediate aid; "Officer needs assistance" is used when an officer needs additional aid; "Back up" request is when an officer is requesting an additional unit. These are in order of graveness, with "back up" requests not to mean a request for help or assistance. A request for back up would not necessarily be an "emergency" call. Most other agencies give a much higher priority or meaning for "back up" requests. Of the above, only "Officer Needs Help" automatically warrants a unit to respond Code 3 (lights/siren) and all other available units in the vicinity to respond Code 2. "Officer Needs Assistance" gets and automatic Code 2 response from the closest unit.

If it was the emergency trigger activated on the radio. Dispatch: "All units stand by, 10A47's trigger has been activated. 10A47 come in..." If there is no response from the officer, then dispatch may treat this an "Officer Needs Help" call, based on the circumstances, last known location (whether or not the officer was out on a call and what type of call), etc., automatically dispatching the closest unit Code 3 to the officer's last known location.

If it is a pursuit. Unit: "10A47, we're in pursuit." Dispatch: "All units stand by, 10A47 is in pursuit.." 10A47 gives location, direction of travel, susp/veh info, reason for pursuit, etc. Dispatch repeats info: "All units, 10A47 is in pursuit [location/direction] of a [susp/veh info], for a [type of crime]..."

If an officer wants to submit a crime broadcast. Unit: "10A47, request frequency for crime broadcast." Dispatch: "All units stand by. 10A47, go ahead." Sometimes, Code 10 is used, but this is incorrect procedure.

If an officer wants to check wants and warrants. Unit: "10A47, Code 10 for [number of suspects to be checked] [juvenile, if so]." Dispatch: "All units stand by. 10A47 go ahead..."

At the end of the officer's crime broadcast or wants and warrants check information/description, you might hear "KMA," indicating he or she is done with the broadcast. KMA367 is LAPD's call sign for its VHF radio system, no longer used for normal patrol. KJC625 is now the call sign used, but veteran officers (and veteran wannabes) still use "KMA" at the end of certain transmissions indicating they are finished, kind of like the radio term "over."


Note: the above is from memory and not from the manual. There may be some minor wording discrepancies, but the gist of it is there. The point is LAPD does not use Code 33, 10-99, 998, or 999, rather plain English in this situation.
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Last edited by hotdjdave; 11-12-2006 at 1:30 AM..
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 11-12-2006, 5:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotdjdave
Emergency traffic. Unit: "Officer needs help" or "10A47, officer needs help/assistance." Dispatch: "All units stand by...officer needs help/assistance (or 10A47 needs help/assistance), 10A47 go ahead..."

The requesting unit can normally be identified by dispatch via the radio's digital broadcast signal and the last known location via the CAD system. "Officer needs help" is when an officer requires immediate aid; "Officer needs assistance" is used when an officer needs additional aid; "Back up" request is when an officer is requesting an additional unit. These are in order of graveness, with "back up" requests not to mean a request for help or assistance. A request for back up would not necessarily be an "emergency" call. Most other agencies give a much higher priority or meaning for "back up" requests. Of the above, only "Officer Needs Help" automatically warrants a unit to respond Code 3 (lights/siren) and all other available units in the vicinity to respond Code 2. "Officer Needs Assistance" gets and automatic Code 2 response from the closest unit.

If it was the emergency trigger activated on the radio. Dispatch: "All units stand by, 10A47's trigger has been activated. 10A47 come in..." If there is no response from the officer, then dispatch may treat this an "Officer Needs Help" call, based on the circumstances, last known location (whether or not the officer was out on a call and what type of call), etc., automatically dispatching the closest unit Code 3 to the officer's last known location.

If it is a pursuit. Unit: "10A47, we're in pursuit." Dispatch: "All units stand by, 10A47 is in pursuit.." 10A47 gives location, direction of travel, susp/veh info, reason for pursuit, etc. Dispatch repeats info: "All units, 10A47 is in pursuit [location/direction] of a [susp/veh info], for a [type of crime]..."

If an officer wants to submit a crime broadcast. Unit: "10A47, request frequency for crime broadcast." Dispatch: "All units stand by. 10A47, go ahead." Sometimes, Code 10 is used, but this is incorrect procedure.

If an officer wants to check wants and warrants. Unit: "10A47, Code 10 for [number of suspects to be checked] [juvenile, if so]." Dispatch: "All units stand by. 10A47 go ahead..."

At the end of the officer's crime broadcast or wants and warrants check information/description, you might hear "KMA," indicating he or she is done with the broadcast. KMA367 is LAPD's call sign for its VHF radio system, no longer used for normal patrol. KJC625 is now the call sign used, but veteran officers (and veteran wannabes) still use "KMA" at the end of certain transmissions indicating they are finished, kind of like the radio term "over."


Note: the above is from memory and not from the manual. There may be some minor wording discrepancies, but the gist of it is there. The point is LAPD does not use Code 33, 10-99, 998, or 999, rather plain English in this situation.
Thanks for the Info..
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