RadioReference on Facebook   RadioReference on Twitter   RadioReference Blog
 

Go Back   The RadioReference.com Forums > Scanners, Receivers and Related Equipment Forums > General Scanning Discussion


General Scanning Discussion - For general questions not specific to a model of scanner or general discussion of use of a scanner. Manufacturer specific posts should be directed to the appropriate forums below and location specific posts should go in the appropriate regional forum..

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-25-2017, 8:09 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: New York N.Y.
Posts: 173
Default What is on this open channel?

On 1,000.2 Mhz NFM, I pick up an open channel with an almost full signal, but haven't heard anything on it.

Two things:

1 - Can somebody please confirm that this is indeed an open channel with nothing being broadcasted, or is
it something else?


2 - What could it be? I don't think it is coming from my apartment, as I still pick it up when I shut off all of
my computer equipment. I initially suspected it may have been a neighbor's baby monitor, but I
thought those operated on lower frequencies.


Here is a clip:

https://soundcloud.com/user-437184959/10002a

Thanks
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-25-2017, 8:16 PM
W8RMH's Avatar
Member
  Audio Feed Provider
Audio Feed Provider
Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Grove City, Ohio (A BearCat not a Buckeye)
Posts: 7,275
Default

Birdie?
__________________
SKYWARN SPOTTER Unication G4 Home Patrol 2 BCD996XT BR330T Bearcat 4
Columbus Police Dispatch - Citywide (Ohio MARCS P25)
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2017, 5:55 AM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Western NJ
Posts: 303
Default

Not sure what type of radio you have, but try disconnecting the antenna and see if there is any change in the signal. As W8RMH stated it might be an internally-generated signal, a.k.a. "birdie."

Check your owner's manual, it might state where birdies exist for your particular model.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2017, 6:56 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: New York North Carolina and all points in between
Posts: 2,309
Default

Cable TV leakage, LED lamp drivers, CFL lamp drivers,TV main RX osc. Could be anything, try shutting off or unplug to narrow it down. Most consumer products are terrible noise generators. We had a satellite receiver LNA across the street from our antenna broadcasting a signal strong enough to block our radio reception, and we broadcast at 50 watts ERP.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2017, 7:17 AM
Wiki Admin Emeritus
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Bowie, Md.
Posts: 20,938
Default

1,000.2 Mhz would really be 1 Ghz. Did you mean 1,000.2 KHz? Mike
__________________
links editor, Utility Monitoring Central
HF Forum moderator, RadioReference
Friends don't let friends buy Scancat Lite Plus!
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2017, 7:50 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: New York N.Y.
Posts: 173
Default

I meant what I posted:

https://i.imgur.com/olFu2iw.jpg


Thanks

Last edited by MikeOxlong; 10-26-2017 at 2:56 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10-26-2017, 10:13 AM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Gilcrest, CO
Posts: 1,046
Default

There is a faint tone near 1250 Hz fading in and out which makes me believe this is a radar signal. That frequency is in the aeronautical band.

Try AM mode to see if you can receive that tone more clearly. By watching which direction planes are flying in the sky in relation to that tone you should be able to tell which direction the radar is located. The tone will be strongest when a plane flies between you and the radar.

There is a radar used by Denver International Airport about 3-4 miles from my house and I hear similar noises from that radar. Some pocket radios (with the internal ferrite core) will pick up the blips of radars many miles away (within line of sight) as the radar spins around (on an unused frequency around 530 KHz).

These type of signals typically do not break the squelch on scanners so they are not easy to find. I once had a scanner that would search this band with the sound unmuted (audible) so that I could locate all these unusual signals from radars which the scanner was passing right over without breaking the squelch.

Shawn
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All information here is Copyright 2012 by RadioReference.com LLC and Lindsay C. Blanton III.Ad Management by RedTyger
Copyright 2015 by RadioReference.com LLC Privacy Policy  |  Terms and Conditions