RadioReference on Facebook   RadioReference on Twitter   RadioReference Blog
 

Go Back   The RadioReference.com Forums > Scanners, Receivers and Related Equipment Forums > General Scanning Discussion


General Scanning Discussion - For general questions not specific to a model of scanner or general discussion of use of a scanner. Manufacturer specific posts should be directed to the appropriate forums below and location specific posts should go in the appropriate regional forum..

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:36 PM
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,008
Default Anyone listen to "distant" AM stations at night?

I was just wonder, since at night you seem to be able to pick up stations that are fairly far away from you, on the AM Broadcast Band, such as WCBS (880) and WABC (770) does anyone do this as a hobby just to see which stations they are actually hearing? Basically like an AM DXer?

I'm impressed with what the AM band can do. I'm used to picking up WABC and WCBS on even a cheap ($5.99) Coby CX-17 radio, and even on an old car I ride in, it has an old radio that seems to pick both stations up fairly ok.

But I was impressed yesterday, I heard WSB from Atlanta, GA, and I swear, it sounded as if it was a local station. Basically no real static or anything. I'm not kidding, it almost felt as if I was in Atlanta, GA at that current time, it was like 10-11PM my time EDT. I was hearing the "Bulldog Radio Network".

I live in Johnstown, Cambria County, PA, so I would think the NYC stations would come in clearer than an Atlanta, GA station because of distance, but appearntly that's not the case.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:40 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: 14.020 MHz @ 30 wpm
Posts: 5,218
Default

Yeah, I do. It can actually be a lot of fun, especially the small town low power stations. I get a kick out of some of the cheesy programming.

Also, if you have a receiver capable of it, listening to the marine and aviation non-directional beacons (NDB's) from 200 KHz to just below the bottom of the AM broadcast band can be a lot of fun. The good stuff starts coming in around midnight.
__________________
Science flies you to the moon. Religion flies you into buildings.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:50 PM
n2mdk's Avatar
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ames, IA
Posts: 2,542
Default

Haven't done it in quite a while but back in the old days err make that the mid 60's you could write to the stations and get QSL cards, from AM stations as well as the SW stations. I had shoe boxes of them. This will give you an idea of what they were. http://cranchedfornow.blogspot.com/2...qsl-cards.html
__________________
Jerri

VX-5
FT-60R

Pro-97
BC246T
BC780XLT
BR330T
BCT15
Grundig Satellit 700
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:50 PM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 569
Default

I have listened and DXed AM radio since I was a kid in the mid-50's. My addiction to this ultimately led me into ham radio as well as commercial radio. AM band DXing used to be more fun years ago as there were fewer stations and many would go off-the-air every night around midnight. Now, we have many more stations on-the-air, 24/7, crowding the spectrum.

There is a very good club dedicated to AM Broadcast Band DXing called the National Radio Club (NRC). It has been around since the early 1930s.

Here is a link to their website which is loaded with lots of info and membership details:

http://www.nrcdxas.org
__________________
Scanning Since 1971
Using Pro92, 94, 97, 106, 2050, 2052, 2004, BC-200XLT
Antiques: TMR-8H, ACT-R10H/L/U, ACT-W10, ACT-A4W
Ham Radio Since 1975 - VE for ARRL, W5YI & WCARS - GROL
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:53 PM
n2mdk's Avatar
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ames, IA
Posts: 2,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KR4BD
I have listened and DXed AM radio since I was a kid in the mid-50's. My addiction to this ultimately led me into ham radio as well as commercial radio. AM band DXing used to be more fun years ago as there were fewer stations and many would go off-the-air every night around midnight. Now, we have many more stations on-the-air, 24/7, crowding the spectrum.

There is a very good club dedicated to AM Broadcast Band DXing called the National Radio Club (NRC). It has been around since the early 1930s.

Here is a link to their website which is loaded with lots of info and membership details:

http://www.nrcdxas.org
Great site, nice collection of QSL cards on there.
__________________
Jerri

VX-5
FT-60R

Pro-97
BC246T
BC780XLT
BR330T
BCT15
Grundig Satellit 700
Reply With Quote
Sponsored links
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 3:55 PM
Wiki Admin Emeritus
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Bowie, Md.
Posts: 20,633
Default

There are 2 clubs here in North America devoted to MW DXing, and one - the LongWave Club of America - devoted to frequencies below 500 khz. All 3 have enjoyed quite a stellar reputation over the years. In fact, the 2 MW clubs - the National Radio club and the International Radio Club of America - between the 2, have almost a century of experience. With the numerous problems with clubs losing members, having such longevity is quite the statement. In addition, our Loops wiki has extensive links dealing with these popular antennas, the basics of which have been around since the dawn of the broadcast era.

The NRC and IRCA have links in our SWL wiki, if anyone's interested. And I think the LWCA's website is http://www.lwca.org or something quite close to that.

73 Mike

[edit] Hmm, getting an unavailable on that LWCA website; hopefully that will change soon, as it seems at least some of the old LW links are redirecting here.
__________________
links editor, Utility Monitoring Central
HF Forum moderator, RadioReference
Friends don't let friends buy Scancat Lite Plus!

Last edited by ka3jjz; 03-16-2008 at 3:58 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 4:42 PM
Zaratsu's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 367
Default

Some of the cheapest AM/FM radios have the best DX capability. They are not sophisticated at all on rejection and isolation and bite on drift, but the sheer distance that they can hear is often staggering compared to expensive radios. The bigger the ferrite bar the better. I had a busted cheap-o store-brand cassette "walkman" (probably a Coby ) that I swear could hear a beatle fart in Zimbabwe. Seriously, I could hear southern Virginia and out to Columbus OH from central Connecticut. I tossed it thinking that "radios are for dorks, I've got an ipod " Yeah, guess what never gets used now?

March is the best time of the year to DX in North America. Atmospheric and solar conditions are great for propigation and skip right now. I hope to take advantage of it a little bit if my Sony 7600GR ever comes in (backordered the past 2 weeks!)

I'm tempted to pick up a Grundig Mini 300 in bronze or red ( slick little radio that really has ears) for $30 to tide me over, but I just know that my Sony SW/MW is going to be here any day now.

It is kind of hard to Dx around here at the moment because after 8p.m. a local spanish-language station goes AM-HD and everything on the AM analog band starts hissing. Hopefully it will go the way of the majority of other AM-HD broadcasters, and cease HD operations. I do anticipate getting tons of great DX action this spring from my coastal Old Lyme, CT hide-away.

After I get the Sony, I will probably be getting my father a GE Superradio II (if I can find one, and one that has a somewhat accurate dial and I'll have to pay three times what they sold for new) or a new Grundig S350DL or the redsun 2100 (best deal for $100) which I believe is PLL digital synth so he doesnt have to deal with drifting stations. Not as fun as twiddling analog and splitting between freqs but plenty of sensitivity.

There are all types of DX nuts out there. Some do FM (Yeah BA Receptor! ) some do TV, SW and even SSTV.
__________________
Public safety voice encryption should be a crime.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 8:33 PM
mciupa's Avatar
Moderator
  RadioReference Database Admininstrator
Database Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 6,206
Default

Not only the US , but Europe can be monitored. However , their Broadcast spacing is 9 kHz.
If your receiver is capable , try tuning 1048 kHz or something slightly off the American standard 10 kHz spacing.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 8:48 PM
LEH's Avatar
LEH LEH is offline
Member
  Premium Subscriber
Premium Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Yorktown, Virginia
Posts: 1,196
Default

I haven't really listened to AM radio is a good many years. As a teen ager, I used an old tube radio to pick up distant AM stations while living in middle Georgia.

I used to get WLS (890) from Chicago, WABC (770) and WCBS (forget) from New York, KDKA (15#0) from Pittsburg, WOWO (1090) from Fort Wayne, IN and several others that I just don't recall after $0 years.
__________________
Lynn
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 9:00 PM
n2mdk's Avatar
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ames, IA
Posts: 2,542
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LEH
$0 years.
I guess that makes me %#
__________________
Jerri

VX-5
FT-60R

Pro-97
BC246T
BC780XLT
BR330T
BCT15
Grundig Satellit 700
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 9:16 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 211
Default

I, too, began my radio communications hobby DX'ing the broadcast band in the 50's. I enjoyed writing for, and receiving QSL cards. I remember pulling Wolfman Jack out of the hash when he was on XERF in Mexico, just over the borde near Del Rio Texas.
Old tube-type car radios on 12 volt power supplies with a long wire antenna strung outside were popular choices for "pullin' them in". Have fun. There is a lot out there.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-16-2008, 9:58 PM
EJB's Avatar
EJB EJB is offline
Member
   
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Halton Region Aldershot
Posts: 3,289
Smile Good subject

I got my start in this hobby by monitoring various radio stations at night back in the 70's.
Listening for baseball games in places far way like St. Louis KMOX and 770 WABC from my Montreal home.
Aching to make thru the static, summering in Ogunquit Maine Montreal stations CFCF 600 or CKAC 730 (770?) for an important Expos game (we had our moments!)

Last edited by EJB; 03-16-2008 at 10:03 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 1:16 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 11
Default

Back in the 70's I spent many a late winter's night here in the UK waiting for the strong Europeans to go off air. Used WINS 1010Khz as a 'beacon' If it came in strongly then I was in for a treat knowing others would roll in. My favourites were WABC WOR and from Canada CINS CHUM CFBC and CJYQ. Receiver was a Grundig Satellite 2000 and a 4 foot square loop antenna.

Definitely recommend the loop it's very directional and sensitive!
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 2:50 AM
Taloniilm's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: NE Texas
Posts: 303
Smile Long time radio enthusiast

My dad got me interested in listening to SW and AM back in the early 60's. I still listen to WOAI, (San Antonio, Tx) almost every night. Of all the scanners, SW and other assorted radios in my collection, ( I think I'm up to 12 or 13 ) I still crank up my old National Panasonic DR28, tune it to a distant AM station and drift off into dream land. Dad's gone now, (he passed away 3 weeks ago) but I'm carrying on his legacy. Man I wish I had his old 1950's Zenith Trans-Oceanic "tube type' that he had back in the day...

73's Dad,
Ray
__________________
Ray H, (KI4WBT)
NE TX Counties Monitored: Hopkins, Hunt, Rains, Delta
Equipment:
BCD-396T, BCD-996T/ XT, BCT-15, PRO-84, PRO-2006, (modified), PRO-2050
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 6:59 AM
Member
   
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 1,209
Default

I still listen to WBZ and WABC on a regular basis.
__________________
Some posts can be interpreted in various ways.

Mine generally mean exactly what they say.
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 8:03 AM
hoser147's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Grand Lake St. Marys Ohio
Posts: 5,160
Default

Good thread I havent done that in 40 years and yep I remember the cards might even have some, somewhere. Its amazing that at times you can here AM 1200 miles from the orginal broadcast.................Hoser
__________________
Good Scanning Hser
http://www.radioreference.com/apps/audio/?feedId=165
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 8:06 AM
Member
  Amateur Radio Operator
Amateur Radio
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: OH
Posts: 35
Default

I like to listen at night using a Sony ICF-2010 and a Yaesu FT-920 with the AM filter. Typical reception at my Ohio location is from the east coast to the rockies.

If you're looking for a good receiver, you can also look for an old Philco or Delco car radio. These radios are already designed to work with a whip antenna (as are all car radios) and they have very selective front ends. If you run the radio from a 12 V battery you don't have to worry about power supply noise.
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 11:10 AM
freqs's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: warren michigan
Posts: 1,205
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taloniilm
My dad got me interested in listening to SW and AM back in the early 60's. I still listen to WOAI, (San Antonio, Tx) almost every night. Of all the scanners, SW and other assorted radios in my collection, ( I think I'm up to 12 or 13 ) I still crank up my old National Panasonic DR28, tune it to a distant AM station and drift off into dream land. Dad's gone now, (he passed away 3 weeks ago) but I'm carrying on his legacy. Man I wish I had his old 1950's Zenith Trans-Oceanic "tube type' that he had back in the day...

73's Dad,
Ray
every sat nite i pick up wsm nashville grand ole opry i have a 1954 trans oceanic i found in the land fill it needs tubes any in fo on how to find some would help
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 12:23 PM
Taloniilm's Avatar
Member
   
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: NE Texas
Posts: 303
Default

I'd do a google search or check ebay
__________________
Ray H, (KI4WBT)
NE TX Counties Monitored: Hopkins, Hunt, Rains, Delta
Equipment:
BCD-396T, BCD-996T/ XT, BCT-15, PRO-84, PRO-2006, (modified), PRO-2050
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2008, 12:47 PM
Member
   
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 213
Default

RedPenguin i just listen to 740am out toronto canada just about every night they play oldies jazz even old radio shows heard the original amos and andy radio shows i live in md but have also picked them up when at the outer banks..nc bob
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All information here is Copyright 2012 by RadioReference.com LLC and Lindsay C. Blanton III.Ad Management by RedTyger
Copyright 2015 by RadioReference.com LLC Privacy Policy  |  Terms and Conditions