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Old 06-12-2017, 9:55 PM
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Question 2017 Ram 2500 w/Diesel (2 batteries)

I will take delivery on a new Ram 2500 Diesel this week and need to (of course) connect power to run an ICOM ID-5100A (VHF/UHF ham radio) transceiver. In most "conventional" vehicles, I connect directly to the battery and chassis ground. With the two batteries in the Ram truck, should this be done? If so, which of the two batteries should provide power to the radio? If, not, is there a common 12 VDC (+) terminal (some vehicles have them near the fuse block input)?

Once I have the power figured out, the next part will be which antenna to use (Larsen "on glass" KG-2/70 is a possibility, unless I can find a way to neatly run a cable from the NMO mag mount into the cab.

Any ideas are very much appreciated.
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Old 06-12-2017, 10:20 PM
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I will take delivery on a new Ram 2500 Diesel this week and need to (of course) connect power to run an ICOM ID-5100A (VHF/UHF ham radio) transceiver. In most "conventional" vehicles, I connect directly to the battery and chassis ground. With the two batteries in the Ram truck, should this be done? If so, which of the two batteries should provide power to the radio? If, not, is there a common 12 VDC (+) terminal (some vehicles have them near the fuse block input)?

Once I have the power figured out, the next part will be which antenna to use (Larsen "on glass" KG-2/70 is a possibility, unless I can find a way to neatly run a cable from the NMO mag mount into the cab.

Any ideas are very much appreciated.
One thing you should understand about diesel trucks is that both batteries are connected together. So look and see which side the best place to obtain the connection is. Normally this is on the drivers side, as that is where the connections normally go through the fire wall into the cab. It generally is where the relay and fuse connections are under the hood. There is another fuse area on the drivers side either under the dash or inside the dash paneling.
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Old 06-12-2017, 10:47 PM
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I just wired the same radio into a new-to-me 2015 f250 with 2 batteries. I connected + and - to one battery. And of course, NMO through the roof is the only way to go.

Now if only I could figure out how to program the memory channels with the software so I don't have to manually enter them one-by-one.


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Old 06-13-2017, 1:03 AM
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Thanks for the help... I will take a much better look once the vehicle is here at home and I can crawl around a bit to see what is what. Somebody told me there is a grommet on the driver side of the firewall that allows fairly easy passage of the power cable - I have to look for that. Coming from a Jeep GC with a battery under the seat, this install will be like stepping back several years... the Jeep was one of the easiest and cleanest installs I have ever done.

For the antenna, I really do not want to drill any holes; there is a sunroof that slides rearward, so that limits roof mounting to a magnetic (and running the cable into the cab in as neat a way as possible). The last resort may be that glass mounted Larsen. Again, a closer look later this week may reveal something a bit more obvious.

For programming, I went with the RT Systems software (uses the same USB cable as the ID-51 HT's); their stuff is excellent and simple to use... just remember to "read" the radio into the software first, then add frequencies, modes, offsets, etc., then shoot it back to the radio. Between my wife's ID-5100A and mine, that software has paid for itself in the time (and frustration) savings.
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Old 06-13-2017, 7:26 AM
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In my F250, I ended up going under the carpet through a factory installed grommet to get into the engine bay. The firewall grommets were a pain to get through.


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Old 06-13-2017, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by w2txb View Post
... For the antenna, I really do not want to drill any holes; there is a sunroof that slides rearward, so that limits roof mounting to a magnetic (and running the cable into the cab in as neat a way as possible). The last resort may be that glass mounted Larsen. Again, a closer look later this week may reveal something a bit more obvious...
Unless you intend on getting some type of rack to put into the bed of your truck, maybe a bed stake antenna mount is ideal. A quick Google search for "bed stake antenna mounts" or this place: https://www.breedlovemounts.com/.

I've used the Larsen KG-2/70 on my wife's Yukon as she had a stipulation of no mounted antennas. It worked fairly well for me! Antenna remained attached to the glass for the whole 10+ years it was on the vehicle. The only thing I had to order once in a while was a replacement swivel mount (Larsen product ID: KGSWIVEL). This was because my wife would park or drive under low hanging trees and forget the antenna was there. Oops!
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Old 06-13-2017, 2:52 PM
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I've got a friend with a 2015...same body style. He's also an ex-Cummins (marine) tech but that's another story...good times watching him cuss his 06 (since he has traded every 2 years).

Anyway, most modern diesel pickups utilize dual batteries (wired in parallel). It is simply because most commercial systems are 24 volt. In terms of energy need to crank the engine, 600A @ 24V is equivalent to 1200A @ 12V...not that it'll take that much effort (really depends on the cylinder/air temperature coming in).

There is a bolt on fender mount that is made for that body style. It's stainless steel, The Antenna Farm has them but you can find them elsewhere. Just google NMO fender mount 2017 Ram HD.
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Old 06-13-2017, 3:33 PM
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Anyway, most modern diesel pickups utilize dual batteries (wired in parallel). It is simply because most commercial systems are 24 volt. In terms of energy need to crank the engine, 600A @ 24V is equivalent to 1200A @ 12V...not that it'll take that much effort (really depends on the cylinder/air temperature coming in).
They are wired in Parallel which equals 12 volts. I'm pretty sure. LOL
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Old 06-13-2017, 4:24 PM
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Anyway, most modern diesel pickups utilize dual batteries (wired in parallel). It is simply because most commercial systems are 24 volt.
No. Wiring batteries in parallel doubles current / amp-hours, not voltage.
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Old 06-13-2017, 8:58 PM
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Also, NMO and sunroofs work..


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Old 06-13-2017, 9:30 PM
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Default 2017 Ram 2500 w/Diesel (2 batteries)

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No. Wiring batteries in parallel doubles current / amp-hours, not voltage.


I know. I am simply stating that most American Diesel engines (such as those made by Cat, Cummins, Navistar, Detroit, International, etc) are made for 24V systems like you find on commercial applications (semis, tractors, commercial power generation, etc). Thus, the pickups have dual batteries, wired in parallel, to provide to provide the starting current to turn the engine over on a 12V system.

The main exception to that is military surplus vehicles such as the Chevrolet M1008 and M1028 with 24V systems on their 6.2L Detroit diesels (12V available in the cab).

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Old 06-13-2017, 10:47 PM
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For bulldozers and semis and the like, yes. For consumer-level automobiles and pickups, no. Either way tossing 24V systems into the discussion makes no sense.
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Old 06-13-2017, 11:00 PM
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For bulldozers and semis and the like, yes. For consumer-level automobiles and pickups, no. Either way tossing 24V systems into the discussion makes no sense.
Unless to provide the info on why the pickups have dual batte4ies and why they are wired in parallel.

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Old 06-13-2017, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by jonwienke View Post
For bulldozers and semis and the like, yes. For consumer-level automobiles and pickups, no. Either way tossing 24V systems into the discussion makes no sense.
Especially since very little modern non-military equipment is in fact 24V, most
of it is 12V. They're just equipped with a whole whopping lot more
ampere-hours than cars and pickups have. For semis
(as an example) 3 or 4 large 12V stud-terminal batteries wired in parallel is a common setup.
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Old 06-14-2017, 12:45 AM
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Especially since very little modern non-military equipment is in fact 24V, most
of it is 12V. They're just equipped with a whole whopping lot more
ampere-hours than cars and pickups have. For semis
(as an example) 3 or 4 large 12V stud-terminal batteries wired in parallel is a common setup.
Every semi I've installed on has been 24V under the hood and 12V in the cab. We're talking about 2017 Mack SD's, 2016 Westerns, 2016 Freights and 2015 Kenworths. Now agricultural tractors are generally 12V. Mining equipment is also 24V (12V converter in cab somewhere).

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Old 06-14-2017, 6:57 AM
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You're both right. Now let's get back on topic


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Old 06-14-2017, 8:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCore25 View Post
Unless to provide the info on why the pickups have dual batte4ies and why they are wired in parallel.

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I own a Diesel pickup with dual batteries. They are wired in parallel, NOT series. The electrical system is 12v through out the entire truck.

They are wired in parallel for current capacity.
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Old 06-14-2017, 8:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayn1n32008 View Post
I own a Diesel pickup with dual batteries. They are wired in parallel, NOT series. The electrical system is 12v through out the entire truck.



They are wired in parallel for current capacity.


I've only stated that 4 times now.


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Old 06-14-2017, 4:47 PM
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I suggest connecting the negative to the ground point (coming from the battery) on the fender, not directly to the battery. This permits the vehicle battery condition monitoring to function normally.
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Old 06-17-2017, 5:02 PM
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Talking Got 'er done!

First, thanks to all who provided information to assist me in this installation. I finished it this afternoon and everything works really well (no surprise there). The radio is beneath and behind the left rear seat; the speaker is above behind, and to the left of the left rear seat. Power was taken from the left side battery and the cabling was run through a small hole in an existing grommet to the left of the steering column. The control and microphone cables, as well as the power cable, were routed beneath the left step plates, so nothing is exposed. The control head mounted easily and securely to the rear wall of the "bucket" in the center console, making it easy and safe to see.
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