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Radio Equipment Installation Forum - Forum for discussing how to install radio communications equipment in Mobile, Base, Command Post, EOC, etc configurations.

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 06-16-2018, 10:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmckenna View Post
The new Fords I have at work and at home specifically say not to connect at the negative post.
The owner's manual for my 2018 Dodge Charger says the same thing. Fortunately, the battery is in the trunk with a nice chassis ground a few inches away from it. Made installing my Yaesu FTM-400DR a breeze.
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Old 06-17-2018, 12:07 AM
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Look where the clutch would be on a stick shift. They just fill that space with a rubber grommet and you can poke right through.
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Old 06-17-2018, 7:17 AM
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Good tip! I used the blanked off clutch hole in my 2010 Jeep Wrangler and 2017 Ram 1500.

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Old 06-17-2018, 7:30 AM
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I run an 8AWG that is fused at the battery for the total Amp draw that I expect to use and run that to a 90 Amp solenoid. I use a switched power wire from the factory fuse block to energize/de-energize the solenoid. I then continue that 8AWG from the solenoid to inside the vehicle where I have a "switched" fuse block. I run all of my radios/equipment to this block that require switched power. This way, for equipment that does not have a switched power wire, when the vehicle key is removed, that equipment will turn off.

For other equipment that requires constant power, I run a second 8AWG from the constant side of the solenoid to a second fuse block to provide constant power.

This is the setup that we use in all of the public safety vehicle installs and keeps the battery from draining if equipment is lets on by accident.
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Old 06-17-2018, 10:07 AM
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A good read for RAM 1500 trucks:

https://www.ramtrucks.com/assets/bbg...o/wirecode.pdf

Looks like I need to redo my grounding on the RAM. Learn something new every day!
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Old 06-22-2018, 8:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladn View Post
I always wire directly to the battery (positive and negative) and use a relay in the engine compartment to power the circuit on/off. 10 ga stranded red/black "zip" cord, positive fused (30A) near the battery. Crimp terminals (soldered) at battery end, Powerpole connectors inside the vehicle.
+1

I also use a RigRunner junction box (w/powerpoles) under the dash to feed additional equipment. Used this arrangement on several vehicles over many years with NO problems.

- John AC4JK
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Old 06-22-2018, 9:52 AM
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I would never go to the body for a ground except if the negative wire from the battery went directly to the engine and grounded the battery there as in my tundra from the factory.
Going to the frame for a ground can cause a floating ground situation. Always run back to the battery or use a Blue Seas fuse block with negative ground terminals which can be connected to the battery via a single wire. 8AWG would be fine.
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Old 06-22-2018, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by call_sign_null View Post
I like adding my own fuse boxes rather than tapping into a factory location for vehicle accessories. In my 2013 F150, I ran 10ga wire from the battery and chassis ground, through the firewall, up the transmission hump and to this fuse panel which I installed in my center console:



The total run of the wire is about 10' so I should be able to draw ~30 amps on this circuit. I have an inline fuse near the battery, and each connection to the box has its own fuse. Running off this panel is a Uniden BCD996P2 which has negligible current draw. I also have a Kenwood TK-8180 and TM-281A, each drawing about 15 amps, though I would not be transmitting on both radios at the same time. Currently on the to-do list is adding a relay to power the panel on/off with the truck ignition.
same thing i use and not expensive at all about 30 bucks amazon i have 2 of them
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Old 06-22-2018, 11:39 AM
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On the negative battery post thing, what I have been noticing in a lot of the newer vehicles there is a current sensor somewhere near the battery around the negative lead. If you connect on the battery side of this sensor, it apparently causes issues with the computer monitoring the condition of the battery. You would need to follow that wire past the sensor to wherever it connects to the chassis or something and connect there. There was an article in QST magazine that referenced this as well in the past few months.
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Old 06-22-2018, 1:12 PM
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The vehicle owners manuals often have pretty good information, at least for the domestic pickups we've been using. Not sure about Honda's and the like.

It's always a good idea to follow the manufacturers recommendations. As stated, the sensors on the negative side of the battery can be tricked if you bypass them and create an alternate path.
On older vehicles, it really depends on the specific situation. Different vehicle brands do things in different ways. I've had installs where attaching the negative lead at the battery resulted in alternator whine on TX and RX audio. Moving the negative lead to the body resolved the issue.
It's difficult to apply a "one size fits all" approach to installs. Understanding how the radio power, grounding, and vehicle all work together are important things for an installer.
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