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Streaming / Broadcasting / Audio Recording - Interested in putting your scanner online for others to hear? Want to listen to other radios on the internet. This forum is here for you to discuss these topics related to streaming scanners online.

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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2017, 6:18 PM
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Originally Posted by cmdrwill View Post
You need to isolate the audio and that requires a ground loop isolator with an audio transformer, with separate input and output windings, to totally isolate the computer ground from the scanner ground. Not all have a real audio transformer in them.

How can you check? There must NOT be any continuity between any of the input side connections to any of the output side connections.
Can you point me in the right direction to buy a ground loop isolator?
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Old 07-27-2017, 7:44 PM
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Apart from ground loop isolation, you should have first all the connected equipment bonded to a single point ground.

Then try reversing the polarity of the AC plugs. Sometimes it is as easy as turning a two prong plug around.
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Old 07-27-2017, 7:50 PM
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Originally Posted by RFI-EMI-GUY View Post
Apart from ground loop isolation, you should have first all the connected equipment bonded to a single point ground.

Then try reversing the polarity of the AC plugs. Sometimes it is as easy as turning a two prong plug around.
I'm not tech savvy. What do you mean bound to a single point ground? The only thing right now is grounded is my roof antenna I got in June. Again I apologize in advance I came looking for help to fix the hum and it's looking like something beyond my area of expertise.
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Old 07-27-2017, 8:23 PM
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I'm not tech savvy. What do you mean bound to a single point ground? The only thing right now is grounded is my roof antenna I got in June. Again I apologize in advance I came looking for help to fix the hum and it's looking like something beyond my area of expertise.
It is a pretty big topic on its own, Picture a star arrangement of wires radiating from a single central point.

That central point is the ground rod (or cluster of ground rods) that make up your building earth ground.

Each radial wire ties a specific item, such as; 1) Your electrical utility meter, 2) your antenna mast and antenna, 3) a bus bar by your operating position where the antenna cables and each piece of radio gear or accessory are grounded together. 4) your cable TV entrance, 5) Your telephone and DSL line ground.

With all of these referenced back to earth at the same central point/ potential you can eliminate hum and prevent lightning damage.

Right now, something in your setup has an AC voltage potential that is higher than the rest and is imparting a voltage variation, likely on the shielded cables to your sound card. You have to reduce that voltage potential (by bonding) and you may need to reverse the phase of the power supply on one of the pieces of equipment. Or install a transformer to break the "common mode current" flowing on those audio cables.

In the good old days of guitar and PA amplifiers there were "hum" switches mounted in the amplifier so that upon setting up at a new venue, the crew could throw a double pole double throw switch that would transpose the neutral and hot wires arriving to the amplifier.

Of course, none of those venues had proper grounding and bonding which lead to the demise of many a guitarist grabbing the mike during a rainstorm.

There are a lot of 'black box" hum blockers, the ones that work are usually simply a 1:1 ratio audio transformer to eliminate common mode current. If it is some cheap capacitive "isolator" that cuts off at 60 Hz, it really may not be that effective.

Here is a cheap one that should work.

https://www.radioshack.com/products/...-loop-isolator

If it fixes your problem, you still need to look at single point grounding for protection of your equipment.
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Last edited by RFI-EMI-GUY; 07-27-2017 at 8:29 PM..
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Old 07-27-2017, 8:38 PM
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This is what I used not 100% if this is correct or not. And it did nothing. If it's not correct can someone point me in the right direction for the correct one.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
A lot of Amazon users complain that it cuts out the bass or distorts the audio. My guess is that it ether has a teeny weeny transformer, or it is nothing but capacitors formed in a high pass filter and therefore just junk.

Get your money back and buy the radio shack part I mentioned.
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Old 07-27-2017, 8:47 PM
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I recently bought 8 port Multicopler and when I hooked them up to my feeds I hear a loud hum. When I take it out replace it with a regular antenna the hum goes away. My question is the Multicoulper is plugged in so I wouldn't notice a loss. The 2 feeds so you can listen.

My question is this fixable or is this suppose to be like that? Stridsberg's website claims no loss with this. In the 8 port I have 2 other scanners plugged in for my personal use non feed.

Lawrence Police Dispatch
Chelsea Police Dispatch
Hmmm (!!!) definitely hearing hum on the Chelsea feed even when the channel is idle. Lawrence, I am hearing CTCSS tone during the transmission, that is normal unless you have a CTCSS filter in the receiver. It sounds good to me. You might try switching the Chelsea radio's power plug around.
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Old 07-27-2017, 9:07 PM
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Originally Posted by RFI-EMI-GUY View Post
Apart from ground loop isolation, you should have first all the connected equipment bonded to a single point ground.

Then try reversing the polarity of the AC plugs. Sometimes it is as easy as turning a two prong plug around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFI-EMI-GUY View Post
A lot of Amazon users complain that it cuts out the bass or distorts the audio. My guess is that it ether has a teeny weeny transformer, or it is nothing but capacitors formed in a high pass filter and therefore just junk.

Get your money back and buy the radio shack part I mentioned.
Is this how I would connect it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epvYj9C18n4
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Old 07-27-2017, 9:23 PM
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Is this how I would connect it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epvYj9C18n4
And if not how do I connect them to the scanner?
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Old 07-27-2017, 9:37 PM
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And if not how do I connect them to the scanner?
The radio shack isolation transformer has two circuits, left and right. So you can isolate both channels. It has RCA connectors on the lines, or you can use the stereo phone plug to mate with the RCA connectors on either input or output. Without seeing exactly what you have, all I can advise is to use the appropriate adaptors to put it in line of your feeds (you can do both feeds). Put in series with your existing feeds at the sound card. There are mono plug adaptors that might be more appropriate to break out left and right for each radio.

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Old 07-27-2017, 9:37 PM
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Is this how I would connect it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epvYj9C18n4
Must be correct for that install I would surmise.

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Old 07-27-2017, 11:00 PM
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Try disconnecting the power, antenna and audio cable from one radio at a time and see if one particular radio eliminates the hum.
If you can isolate the source of the hum to just one radio out of the four you have connected, that would likely be the radio causing the ground loop.

The ground loop is most likely being created in the audio circuit so once you find the radio causing it, also disconnect the audio cable into whatever you are using to feed the audio into.

If the other three radios work without hum, the disconnected radio is probably the culprit and the one you should experiment with ground loop isolators on. Start with an audio ground loop isolator located at your sound devices input for the culprit radio.

If you are lucky, only one radio out of the four is causing the hum which can save some time and money as you would only need one ground loop isolator.
I'd still get a spare isolator or two as you will probably add more radios into the mix at a later date figuring you have an 8 port multicoupler.

Everyone gave you good suggestions but I did not see this process of elimination mentioned. Sorry if it was and I simply overlooked it.

Almost all modern day scanners will use a switching power supply today but the good thing is most scanners will use a common voltage of 12 or 13.8 VDC output so finding a decent linear power supply to power all your radios is fairly easy to find. That will allow all your radios to have a common ground which several posts in this thread mentioned. Having that common ground can go a long way in eliminating ground loop issues. You just need to make sure all your radios will accept the output voltage your power supply puts out. The Stridsberg coupler will also run fine from a standard 12 to 13.8 VDC linear power supply as they are setup for 12 volts.

If you are serious about feeding four or more radios audio, a decent power supply can be a big help in eliminating these problems.
Some cheap USB type audio devices in the computer can also cause problems as they don't always have true grounds at the inputs, they float the ground connection instead and when you tie them all together like you are doing through the multi-coupler, you can create a ground loop as all grounds would now be tied together electrically.

Are any of your radios the BCD536HP? That radio uses a BTL output for its external speaker jack. You cannot tie any of the EXT Speaker jack wires to ground on that model. The headphone jack is safe though.

So, try and isolate the hum to just one radio and then concentrate on isolating the ground on just that radio.
If all radios cause hum when just one radio is hooked up, the problem is likely going to be in the sound device you are plugging into on the computer.
Make sure the computer is plugged into the same power source as your multicoupler and all the radios.
If that is not practical, you could always use an external audio mixer like a band would use and then install the ground loop isolator between the mixers output and the sound devices input on the computer.
A mixer can also be nice as it will allow you to adjust all the radios to a normalized audio level. Then if you still have hum between radios, you would still need a ground loop isolator on the culprit radio(s).

This was all a lot easier when several radio models had fixed line level audio outputs. Those outputs allowed you to still listen to the radio and adjust its speaker volume without altering the output level going to your audio feed computer.

This may sound complicated but it is not really that bad once you find the culprit radio by trial and error by removing one radio at a time.

Last edited by kruser; 07-27-2017 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 07-28-2017, 8:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kruser View Post
Try disconnecting the power, antenna and audio cable from one radio at a time and see if one particular radio eliminates the hum.
If you can isolate the source of the hum to just one radio out of the four you have connected, that would likely be the radio causing the ground loop.

The ground loop is most likely being created in the audio circuit so once you find the radio causing it, also disconnect the audio cable into whatever you are using to feed the audio into.

If the other three radios work without hum, the disconnected radio is probably the culprit and the one you should experiment with ground loop isolators on. Start with an audio ground loop isolator located at your sound devices input for the culprit radio.

If you are lucky, only one radio out of the four is causing the hum which can save some time and money as you would only need one ground loop isolator.
I'd still get a spare isolator or two as you will probably add more radios into the mix at a later date figuring you have an 8 port multicoupler.

Everyone gave you good suggestions but I did not see this process of elimination mentioned. Sorry if it was and I simply overlooked it.

Almost all modern day scanners will use a switching power supply today but the good thing is most scanners will use a common voltage of 12 or 13.8 VDC output so finding a decent linear power supply to power all your radios is fairly easy to find. That will allow all your radios to have a common ground which several posts in this thread mentioned. Having that common ground can go a long way in eliminating ground loop issues. You just need to make sure all your radios will accept the output voltage your power supply puts out. The Stridsberg coupler will also run fine from a standard 12 to 13.8 VDC linear power supply as they are setup for 12 volts.

If you are serious about feeding four or more radios audio, a decent power supply can be a big help in eliminating these problems.
Some cheap USB type audio devices in the computer can also cause problems as they don't always have true grounds at the inputs, they float the ground connection instead and when you tie them all together like you are doing through the multi-coupler, you can create a ground loop as all grounds would now be tied together electrically.

Are any of your radios the BCD536HP? That radio uses a BTL output for its external speaker jack. You cannot tie any of the EXT Speaker jack wires to ground on that model. The headphone jack is safe though.

So, try and isolate the hum to just one radio and then concentrate on isolating the ground on just that radio.
If all radios cause hum when just one radio is hooked up, the problem is likely going to be in the sound device you are plugging into on the computer.
Make sure the computer is plugged into the same power source as your multicoupler and all the radios.
If that is not practical, you could always use an external audio mixer like a band would use and then install the ground loop isolator between the mixers output and the sound devices input on the computer.
A mixer can also be nice as it will allow you to adjust all the radios to a normalized audio level. Then if you still have hum between radios, you would still need a ground loop isolator on the culprit radio(s).

This was all a lot easier when several radio models had fixed line level audio outputs. Those outputs allowed you to still listen to the radio and adjust its speaker volume without altering the output level going to your audio feed computer.

This may sound complicated but it is not really that bad once you find the culprit radio by trial and error by removing one radio at a time.
Thank you for your detailed response. I did do a test. On one of my scanners I have a regular rubber 800 MHz antenna on it. I took it out and put the new antenna on it. As soon as I did that it started the annoying hum, I took it out put the rubber 800 MHz back and the went away. I bought a new antenna jumper cable to see if I'm possibly using the wrong cable for it. I also bought a new power supply, a mono wire instead of stereo wire so I'm going to test that tomorrow when it comes. I think by the test I may have figured out its the antenna causing my problems. I have a separate computer which i use a CVM switch for my feed. I wouldn't be able to move it without buy longer cables to fit into the multicoulper. The scanners I have is BCT15X and I got a Uniden BC355N. the 15X the wire is going into the back. I tried the front and didn't notice a change of the hum.

So I have options to try tomorrow and hoping one of them will work. If not I will try to get that the Radio Shack isolator and try that out
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Old 07-29-2017, 5:40 PM
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Update: Nothing worked still a hum. I tried the following. My question is the RS Ground Loop Isolater there are RCA cables I know those are for TV's. Where do they plug into the back of the scanner? I saw a youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epvYj9C18n4 He/She is connecting them together as one. But do I take the last cable and plug it into the back where it says Ext Speaker? If I did that where would I put the cable to the Ext speaker?

1. Used a new antenna

2. Used a new power supply

3. Used a new mono cable instead of stereo cable.
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Old 07-29-2017, 6:37 PM
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Update: Nothing worked still a hum. I tried the following. My question is the RS Ground Loop Isolater there are RCA cables I know those are for TV's. Where do they plug into the back of the scanner? I saw a youtube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epvYj9C18n4 He/She is connecting them together as one. But do I take the last cable and plug it into the back where it says Ext Speaker? If I did that where would I put the cable to the Ext speaker?

1. Used a new antenna

2. Used a new power supply

3. Used a new mono cable instead of stereo cable.

When you buy the radio shack isolator it is supposed to come with one RCA to stereo phone plug adaptor. You will probably need 2 (or 4) RCA to mono phone plug adapters to isolate one (or two) radios.

It might help if you could draw us a picture of how everything is wired or take some good photos.

By the way, your complaint was about the hum occuring when you installed the Stridesberg yet your last post mentions a rubber duck, and now you say a new antenna, so is the Stridesberg still part of the equation?

That video isn't helpful in that we can't see how it is plugged into the radio.

My guess is that the owner is using stereo jacks and that only one of the transformers in the isolator (there are two L & R) is actually being used. If he is plugged into the speaker outlet that is OK because of the transformer. Remember there is a caution that if you are using the speaker outlet directly (without any isolation transformer) you might well damage the power amplifier in the receiver. That was mentioned a few posts above and is common to many model scanners. Have to tried using the earphone or recording jack temporarily?
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Last edited by RFI-EMI-GUY; 07-29-2017 at 6:44 PM..
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Old 07-29-2017, 6:57 PM
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When you buy the radio shack isolator it is supposed to come with one RCA to stereo phone plug adaptor. You will probably need 2 (or 4) RCA to mono phone plug adapters to isolate one (or two) radios.

It might help if you could draw us a picture of how everything is wired or take some good photos.

By the way, your complaint was about the hum occuring when you installed the Stridesberg yet your last post mentions a rubber duck, and now you say a new antenna, so is the Stridesberg still part of the equation?

That video isn't helpful in that we can't see how it is plugged into the radio.

My guess is that the owner is using stereo jacks and that only one of the transformers in the isolator (there are two L & R) is actually being used. If he is plugged into the speaker outlet that is OK because of the transformer. Remember there is a caution that if you are using the speaker outlet directly (without any isolation transformer) you might well damage the power amplifier in the receiver. That was mentioned a few posts above and is common to many model scanners. Have to tried using the earphone or recording jack temporarily?
OK it wont let let load a picture. So I will do my best to explain.

The back of the scanner is Ext. Speaker. That is where I use the mono or stereo cable and take the other end into the USB soundcard and that's it. I have the Multicoulper and the back of my monitor and it's plugged in I run the cable into the empty ports into the back of the scanner where the antenna goes.

The other antenna is from another feed I have and wanted to test it out.

RCA to mono phone plug adapters do have a link like you did from Radio shack so I can buy that too? Thanks
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Old 07-29-2017, 7:58 PM
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OK it wont let let load a picture. So I will do my best to explain.

The back of the scanner is Ext. Speaker. That is where I use the mono or stereo cable and take the other end into the USB soundcard and that's it. I have the Multicoulper and the back of my monitor and it's plugged in I run the cable into the empty ports into the back of the scanner where the antenna goes.

The other antenna is from another feed I have and wanted to test it out.

RCA to mono phone plug adapters do have a link like you did from Radio shack so I can buy that too? Thanks
If you are plugged in like that, you may very well be grounding the amplifier inside the scanner since soundcards are unbalanced connections with reference to ground and the speaker output may have a balanced amplifier that is never supposed to be grounded (Read the manual!!!!). If you buy the transformer isolator it will fix that problem as well as eliminate any other ground faults.

I don't provide links on google or research the Radio Shack catalog on request for free. My hourly rate is $175 . We can use Paypal if you wish.
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Old 07-29-2017, 8:59 PM
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If you are plugged in like that, you may very well be grounding the amplifier inside the scanner since soundcards are unbalanced connections with reference to ground and the speaker output may have a balanced amplifier that is never supposed to be grounded (Read the manual!!!!). If you buy the transformer isolator it will fix that problem as well as eliminate any other ground faults.

I don't provide links on google or research the Radio Shack catalog on request for free. My hourly rate is $175 . We can use Paypal if you wish.
Are you serious charging someone to help??????? I've been a member since 2007 and have gotten plenty of support and you want to charge me $175 and hour?
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Old 07-29-2017, 9:04 PM
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Seriously. I help folks all the time on these boards and they help me. For free. But asking to find a link to an item, sold by Radio Shack?, well, one expects to do some research on their own. Google is your friend.

I am "semi-retired" and the wife constantly reminds me I could be making 250K a year given the time spent contributing on these boards. And yes $175 an hour is my rate for telling folks what time it is, using their watch.
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Old 07-29-2017, 9:13 PM
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Seriously. I help folks all the time on these boards and they help me. For free. But asking to find a link to an item, sold by Radio Shack?, well, one expects to do some research on their own. Google is your friend.

I am "semi-retired" and the wife constantly reminds me I could be making 250K a year given the time spent contributing on these boards. And yes $175 an hour is my rate for telling folks what time it is, using their watch.
You asked what my setup is. I'm new to this I've mentioned this from the beginning of the forum. I'm sorry. All I need to know is when i get the Isoloator what else do I need to buy in order for it to work. Again I know how to do stuff I've tried my research on google but when it comes to stuff like this it gets beyond my area of expertise. That's why I created a forum in hoping someone would say you need to buy this ground loop also you would need to buy this with it because of A-Z. And when you get it this is how it's setup. Right now I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place.
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Old 07-30-2017, 3:22 AM
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Not sure how to answer your questions. If you post pictures of the hook up, or draw a picture maybe. Too many different types of ways to wire up a sound card.If you are using the speaker jack, almost certainly you are grounding your receiver audio amplifier through the sound card which can damage the receiver audio amp (Read the manual!).
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