14.322 Usb

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w0fg

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The HF bands like 20m tend to open to South America in the early evening just before they fade out. Often the Argentinians and Brazilians are the last signals you hear before the band goes dead.
 

nexus

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IdleMonitor said:
Any takers as to what's on here. Good solid signal with what sounds like spanish. Also around the 14.3275 USB area as well.
That is in the 20 meter Amateur Radio band.

14.100 mHz to 14.350 mHz is VOICE (USB) for radio amateurs (HAMS) world wide. 14.100 to 14.150 mhz is for Hams outside of the USA. and from 14.150 to 14.350 are where the USA can transmit, but everyone else in the world can transmit to 14.350.

You're just hearing a couple of hams talk in another language. Its like that all of the time. There are some regulars on 14.250 speaking in a spanish type of language all the time. They're required by FCC rules to ID their callsign in ENGLISH or CW (morse code).

From 14.000 to 14.099 is used for digital modes and morse code by everyone.
 

elk2370bruce

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They're only required to ID their station in English if they are operating within the jurisdiction of the FCC. In their own country of residence, they follow their own national rules and most required ID in the native language. There are some high powered South American ops that I never hear id their station and still a few that love their echo generator.
 
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