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2 Channels, 1 Repeater?

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SKYNET156

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Is it possible to repeat 2 channels on 1 repeater?

or are 2 repeaters involved for each addition channel?
 

davidgcet

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define "channels" and if you mean simultaneously repeating them or one at a time.
 

kc8mln

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as david already asked, it depends on how you meant "repeating" and "channels" and what you are attempting to accomplish...

There is a traditional true repeater that is a single receiver and a single transmitter in a cabinet that simultaneously repeates the received audio thru the transmitter....

And then there is a back to back radio repeater. Where two radios are connected back to back, giving you two seperate receivers and two seperate transmitters. Such as connecting two Motorola Micor's back to back. This gives you basically 2 repeaters in one package and accordingly, 2 channels for use as repeater channels, each operating seperatly from the other and they can be configured to simultaneously transmit at the same time since there are 2 seperate of everything.

This is a setup we use in one of our repeater sites and works great to double capacity on our system for this repeater site.
 

zz0468

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Possible, as in allowed by the laws of physics? Certainly. But you left out enough details for people to determine what it is you're really trying to do.
 

SKYNET156

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Sorry i was not more descript, I was thinking more along the lines of having a repeater, and if i had it set to repeat on channel 1, can i switch to channel 2 and have the same repeater set to repeat on channel 2 at the same time it's repeating on channel 1? or are 2 repeaters required for multi channel repeating? the reason i ask is because i see that some of the newer repeaters like the Mototrbo's have more than 1 channel, and i've seen 16 and 32 channel vertex repeaters as well
 

RADIOGUY2002

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As far as the vertex repeaters go, its only a single channel in the device that is typically setup for a repeater. The typical configuration consist of a duplexer allowing for one antenna, however you can utilize multiple channels on the device if you used two separate antennas. But, it will only allow for one repeater pair at a time. See below example

With duplexer
F1 152.9775 REP TRANSMITS 159.7375 REP RECEIVES ON

With out duplexer
F1 152.9775 REP TRANSMITS 159.7375 REP RECIVES ON
F2 151.9775 REP TRANSMITS 158.7375 REP RECIVES ON
F3 150.9775 REP TRANSMITS 157.7375 REP RECIVES ON

*You would have to select one of the channels for the repeater function*

Now for Mototrbo you can do several things, a repeater channel pair can be broken into 2 channels based on time slots and allow for interlinking via the internet to allow for additional repeaters in weak or poor areas of coverage. The traditional way was to provide a backbone via phone line or microwave or threw dedicated rf frequency. Different ways have their advantages and disadvantages.

Typically you can have multiple repeaters on the same frequency but they are controlled by voters which dedicated where the portable or mobile bounces off of first. Or you can have different input tones or different input frequency directed to the same output frequency.
 

n5ims

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Sorry i was not more descript, I was thinking more along the lines of having a repeater, and if i had it set to repeat on channel 1, can i switch to channel 2 and have the same repeater set to repeat on channel 2 at the same time it's repeating on channel 1? or are 2 repeaters required for multi channel repeating? the reason i ask is because i see that some of the newer repeaters like the Mototrbo's have more than 1 channel, and i've seen 16 and 32 channel vertex repeaters as well
The general rules are 1 repeater will take up two frequencies (an input frequency that the handhelds, mobiles, etc. transmit on and the repeater listens to, and an output frequency that the repeater transmits on and the handhelds, mobiles, etc. listen to). In the old analog world, 1 repeater = 1 channel. You want more channels that are repeated, you license an additional pair of frequencies for each additional channel. To define a "channel on these you simply need to specify what frequency is assigned to that channel.

On the PL issue, different PLs don't define different channels simply because the transmission, regardless of what PL is used, takes up the whole channel so only one is available at a time. This is like an old pay phone, while that phone can call anyone in the world, only one person at a time can use it.

Some newer technologies allow you to split a frequency pair into more than a single channel. This is by that technology somehow splitting the signals up so they no longer take up the whole frequency. For MotoTRBO, this is done by what can be viewed as a time-share arrangement (yes, like those condos at the beach where you own one week and other owners own their own week). MotoTRBO splits the channels into two very short time slices, both on the same frequency. Channel 1 may use timeslice "A" and channel 2 may use timeslice "B". A "channel" on those systems is defined not only by what frequency it uses, but also by what timeslice on that frequency carries that channel.

Trunking does things a bit differently. A single frequency pair (one repeater) carries only a single transmission at a time. The difference is that a trunking system uses the idle time to allow other transmissions to take place. A "channel" on a trunking system isn't necessarily assigned a specific frequency, but a talkgroup. A radio wanting to transmit on a "channel" first must ask the trunking system for permission to talk on that channel/talkgroup and the system will tell the radio what frequency to use for that transmission. If no frequency is currently available, the system sends out a cancel code to the radio, which generally gives a beep (often more of a bonk) so the user knows to try again in a bit. This is how a simple 8 or 9 frequency trunking system can handle many times more "channels" than there are frequencies on the system. If, like on most systems, the activity on a single channel is generally quite low, more "channels" can be assigned onto that system.

The RR WIKI has articles that may help explain many of these topics so I've only given a brief discription of how they work.
 

kc8mln

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so you want to be able to simulcast/multicast from 1 received channel and retransmit it on 2 seperate channels at the same time...???

Our local county sheriff and FD does that across a few different bands for reception in areas of the county and/or for users on the system that use a different band to access the radio system. but, if that's what you wanna do, then yes, that can be done across bands or in the same band if needed as long as you run seperate antennas for each transmitter if you are doing it in the same band.
 
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